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7

In the introduction of the Chovot Halevavot published by Mosad Harav Kook, he brings that it is not known how to pronounce the name. He says that Ashkenazim pronounce it Bechaye, and Sefardim pronounce it Bachye. See there for some other opinions and rationals as well.


7

R. Reuven Margalios in his פנינים ומרגליות has a note on this name. His theory is that it is not an actual name, but a nickname which means "may he live long," like the (Yiddish) name "Alter." He proves that it is not a real name because in a manuscript of Kad ha-Kemach, the author is listed as R. Yehuda. According to this, it would presumably be pronounced ...


6

It's a Dagesh Forte which indicates gemination of the consonant "w". So the word would be read something like Yiwwadha' with a prolonged /w/ sound. The word is in passive future third-person masculine singular and means "[he] will be known".


6

The Gemara in Pesachim 50a brings a verse that Hashem's name is not pronounced the way it is written. ר' אבינא רמי כתיב {שמות ג-טו} "זה שמי לעלם וזה זכרי לדור דור". ‏ אמר הקב''ה: לא כשאני נכתב אני נקרא. נכתב אני ביו''ד ה''א, ונקרא אני באל''ף דל''ת‏ R' Avina taught it to us, based on the verse in Shmot 3:15 that says זֶה שְּׁמִי לְעֹלָם וְזֶה ...


6

Rav Saadiah Gaon writes in Chapter 2 of his commentary to Sefer Yetzirah lays down the correct pronunciation of the Hebrew letters, saying that not only is there בגד־כפת letters, but that even the ר has an alternate pronunciation with a dagesh so more like בגד־כפרת according to him. He basically says that Hebrew and Arabic share all the exact same sounds, ...


6

The Aleppo, Leningrad, and Damascus Codices all have it Rafeh. Even the original Bomberg Mikraot Gedolot has it Rafeh! Minchat Shai ad loc. comments that it should be Rafeh. I did find that the Codex Bodmer 21 does have it with a Dagesh but given the evidence this should clearly be disregarded. I note all the above sources (even Bodmer) have a Tarcha (a ...


5

This was not in opposition to Maskilim, and is not specific to Hasidim. In fact, dialectic variation in Yiddish (whence the Hebrew pronunciation) predates the Haskalah. Max Weinreich, on page 16 of the first volume of his געשיכטע פֿון דער ייִדישער שפּראַך (History of the Yiddish Language), says: .1700 די הײַנטיקע ייִדישע דיאַלעקטן־סיסטעם האָט זיך ...


5

The word you're referring to is not actually a pronunciation of the tetragramaton; it's a substitution. Traditionally, the tetragramaton was pronounced (with its real pronunciation, I mean) by the kohein gadol (high priest) on Yom Yippur, but this was a special occasion. Otherwise, while it's possible that early Jews might have pronounced the name, by the ...


4

The Hebrew language is considered the holy tongue, but not because it is ascetically pleasing from a grammarian's view point. It is holy because holy people use it to convey holy ideas, and it is ill suited (in its original incarnation) for speaking on profane matters. The Rambam writes: I have also a reason and cause for calling our language the holy ...


4

Many of your point are only relevant to Modern Hebrew, which is a distinct language from Biblical Hebrew, only the latter being a holy language. In fact, many orthodox Jews distance themselves from Modern Hebrew (to the point of prohibiting its use in their synagogues) because of what is deemed to be its inherent un-holiness. Nevertheless, let me address ...


3

Proper pronunciation and proper distinguishing of letters and vowels is halakha. How must one enunciate? He must be careful not to pronounce [a letter with] a strong dagesh as if there were no dagesh, or [a letter with] no dagesh as if there were one. Nor should one pronounce the silent sheva or silence the pronounced sheva. Hil. Kriath Shema' 2:9 and ...


3

The Shulchan Aruch's organization is based on that of the Tur. In particular, here, the laws listed in the question are presented in the same order, with the same section-numbering, in the Tur. So, the question is why :22 and :23 are in that order in the Tur. When the Tur presents the laws in 61:16-22, it does so without explicitly citing sources, ...


2

While not the pesaq (Halakhic ruling) of Hakham 'Ovadiah A"H himself, his son Hakham Yitzhaq Yosef SheLIT"A, who more frequently than not rules like his father, states (my translation and emphasis) in Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh, Yalqut Yosef (Orahh Hayim 53:10): אין ממנים שליח צבור למי שאינו מבטא את האותיות כתקנן, כגון שקורא לאות חי''ת כמו כ''ף רפויה, או כמו ...


2

Nit'ey Gavriel nesuin part 1 page 344. http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=46545&pgnum=344 Has it with nekudot with commentaries (one of the commentaries explains why he decided to put these nekudot)


2

"Modern Orthodox," like its superset, "Orthodox," does not refer to a particular ethno-historial line of tradition, like "Yemenite" or "Galician," or to a particular centrally-led movement, like Chabad or Conservative. As such, it can't possibly have a well-defined notion of a particular tradition of pronunciation. A teacher in a MO school (or any other ...


1

The correct pronunciation is a pharyngealized glottal stop. The best way to learn to pronounce this letter is to learn how to properly learn how to pronounce a Teth (ט) first. This is a pharyngealized voiceless alveolar stop. To make this sound, make your tongue into a cup. It should be pressing on your furthest back top molars. You should also feel an ...


1

You're right. "tending toward tseirei" is exactly equivalent to the shva that you already heard about. When a shva is in the beginning of a word, it sounds very similar to a tseirei, just quicker. That's probably what the Bach meant by "tending toward tseirei". A semi-proof for this we see in Mishna Berura (same place) where he says: ... וגם בנקודת ...


1

I checked Artscroll, Koren (a machzor, but that shouldn't matter), Sim Shalom (used by Conservative), Tehilot Hashem (nusach Ari, used by Chabad), and Gates of Prayer (older Reform siddur). All have כָּל. The OP then said in a comment that the siddur in question is Mishkan T'filah, the current Reform siddur. I just checked that and, sure enough, the ...


1

Hidāyat al-Qāriʾ (see Eldar's edition) indicates that the regular resh pronunciation was articulated at the middle of the tongue. This is farther out than the articulation for fricative gimel (IPA: ɣ) or the fricative kaf (IPA: x), which was articulated "at the back third of the tongue". This suggests that resh had an advanced uvular articulation. It is ...


1

I am not a speaker of modern Hebrew, but am a beginning level learner of Biblical Hebrew. However I did study about ancient Hebrew pronunciation, linguistics, and specifically phonetics quite a bit. I lean heavily in three areas, 1. "logical" phonetics, belief that original/Biblical Hebrew is designed and there should be logical rules to discover when ...


1

In Biblical Hebrew the words לֹא (lōʾ) and לֹו (lô) are homophonic. According to the Masorah of the Masoretic Text, there are two instances (1 Sam 2:16 and 1 Sam 20:2) where the לֹא (lōʾ) is to be understood in lieu of the written לֹו (lô). On the other hand, there are 17 instances where the לֹו (lô) is to be understood in lieu of the written לֹא (lōʾ). As ...


1

(perhaps that the intention of the reader should be for לו as opposed to לא) That seems to be what it is. The commentary (whose?) surrounding it in the linked edition reads as such, explaining each case as if it were written with לו. It seems to be like when we say אל תקרי __ אלא __ -- we don't actually change the pronunciation; we just darshen ...


1

There are two points I'll make. But I do hope someone else has a sourced answer. First of all, this is something 'in the Torah' that these heretics are careful about. Therefore, they have believability as per the first chapter in Chulin regarding the Cuthim. Second, the Tshuvas HaRashba Hamyuchas LiHaRamban siman 232 which is brought in the Meiri's Kiryas ...


1

The variant i'm used to hearing is that daleth without a dagesh should sound like the "th" sound in the english word "the." Here is a video according to this tradition, a Mizrahi accent, non Yemenite. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSAu-wBvYHg


1

Here's my best guess: because when it's taught to little children, it's much easier to sing "Gimel/Daled/Hei ..." Than to sing the accurate: "Gimel/Dalet/Hei ..." But both of those are far easier than trying to do: "Gimel/Dales/Hei If you end the middle letter with a fricative, you have to pause to breathe before the "h" in "Hei." Or else ...



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