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16

It's one of 10 traditional exceptions to the rules of BeGeD KePeT recorded by the master masorete Ben Asher in his Dikdukei haTa'amim. Minchat Shai records two homiletic explanations: The second מי כמכה follows God's name and we don't want it to sound like we are declaring God to be a fellow named מיכה. The stronger form in the latter phrase indicates a ...


8

As I learned in the various Aramaic language classes I took in Revel, the yud in these cases is silent, and only exists to show the plurality. The parallel is to Hebrew, where the yud appears after the segol, but is also entirely unpronounced. For example in אֲבוֹתֶיךָ, it is to be pronounced avotecha, not avoteycha.


6

Rav Saadiah Gaon writes in Chapter 2 of his commentary to Sefer Yetzirah lays down the correct pronunciation of the Hebrew letters, saying that not only is there בגד־כפת letters, but that even the ר has an alternate pronunciation with a dagesh so more like בגד־כפרת according to him. He basically says that Hebrew and Arabic share all the exact same sounds, ...


5

There is no support for slurring words. Many poskim, the Mishnah Berurah among them, speak out strongly against slurring words, skipping, or mispronouncing. See the Mishnah Berurah in his opening to Hilchos Berachos and Pesukei D'zimra. He says that one must say blessings and pray as slowly as one who is extremely careful and meticulous about counting his ...


4

Minchas Shay says it's a matter of dispute: יש מרז״ל מפרשים אותו קדש ויש מפרשים אותו חול עיין ב״ר וחולין פרק גיד הנשה ועיין מ״ש סוף פ׳ ויצא Some of our rabbis explain it as holy, and some explain it as secular. See B'reshis Raba and Chulin (the chapter Gid hanashe) and see what I wrote at the end of the section Vayetze. Following the links: ...


4

The book מפתח הדלת, by ישראל חיים (Chaim) Lenchitz, revised edition, 5766, quotes this from Radak's Michlol, though I don't know where it is in Michlol: צריך אדם להזהר ולהבדיל בין ו״ו ובית רפה That is: A person must be careful and distinguish between vav and light ves. The same book claims that Radak says the same (in the same place in Michlol) ...


4

I believe that @YeZ is correct. When I lived in Washington Heights (upper Manhattan, NYC), I occasionally attended Cong. Sha'arei Hatikvah, which, I understand, still exists in the same location - across the street from the G.W. Bridge Bus terminal. They were "staunchly" Yekke. All 'ayins were pronounced as you describe, and the Chazan would say "Elokei ...


4

It's in the Hakdomoh to דברי יואל - שו"ת - חלק א שאל אותו אחד מן המתחדשים שרצה להתעולל עמו, כיון שהאותיות ״ ס ׳ ש׳ ת׳״ שוין הם במבטא מה צורך יש בשלשת! והי׳ די באחד מהם, ורבינו מבלי לחשוב אפילו רגע השיב לו מיד, א״כ איך הי׳ נכתב הפסוק ״וכסילים מתי תשכילו״


3

They are still pretty punctilious about using this pronunciation at Congregation Shearith Israel, the Spanish and Portuguese synagogue on the Upper West Side.


3

The Wikipedia list of Hebrew abbreviations has the following entries: רמ״ח (ramach) - 1) The 248 positive mitzvot. 2) The 248 limbs of the human body. See also תרי״ג and שס״ה שס״ה (shesah) - 1) The 365 negative mitzvot or prohibitions (Makkot 23b, end). 2) The 365 veins and sinews of the human body (Zohar I, 170b). 3) The 365 days of the solar ...


3

In Kitzur Yalkut Yosef 271:13, Ovadya Yosef rules that when it comes to kiddush and havdallah, there is no need to be concerned (kpeida) about different accents. An Ashkenazi fulfills his obligation by listening to a sefardi's recitation, and vice versa.


3

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein writes in the Igros Moshe Orach Chaim vol 5 siman 20 subsection 32 that it is more important to repeat it when reading it in parshas Ki Seitzei than in parshas Zachor. But, just for the record, the Vilna Gaon also repeated it during Ashrei, and no one seems to have accepted that practice.


3

Chacham Ovadia in Yechave Daas 6:siman 19 pg 110 writes that we are not makpid on accent pronunciation even for davening whether one is sefard or ashkanaz. However, when it comes to parshas Zachar and parshas Parah he writes one should listen from his style of pronunciation since its a d'orasia.


2

The opinion of the Minchat Shai (and most commentators, from what I can tell), is that a meteg on a short vowel in a closed syllable is almost always a euphonic meteg (there for stress or to stop you from swallowing a syllable, but not for the vowel quality), and thus does not affect the following shva. See also Geoffrey Khan's The Tiberian Pronunciation of ...


2

Mishna Berura writes (46:2) that the correct pronunciation is with a צירי, making it "yisgadeil v'yiskadeish." The reason he gives for that is that even though kaddish is in Aramaic (which would imply yisgadal, apparently), these two words are meant to be in Hebrew. This phrase is based on a verse (Yechezkel 38:23), which uses the phrase "והתגדלתי והתקדשתי" ...


2

While not the pesaq (Halakhic ruling) of Hakham 'Ovadiah A"H himself, his son Hakham Yitzhaq Yosef SheLIT"A, who more frequently than not rules like his father, states (my translation and emphasis) in Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh, Yalqut Yosef (Orahh Hayim 53:10): אין ממנים שליח צבור למי שאינו מבטא את האותיות כתקנן, כגון שקורא לאות חי''ת כמו כ''ף רפויה, או כמו ...


2

In Aruch Hashulchan, סימן ס״א, סעיף ח׳, regarding K'rias Shema, it states: וכן בין שי"ן שמאלית לתי"ו רפה.... וכן הסמ"ך לא יהיה דומה לתי"ו רפה That means that one should be careful to distinguish between שׂ (Sin) and ת (Saf, or Taf without a dagesh), and also between ס (Samech) and ת.


1

There are two points I'll make. But I do hope someone else has a sourced answer. First of all, this is something 'in the Torah' that these heretics are careful about. Therefore, they have believability as per the first chapter in Chulin regarding the Cuthim. Second, the Tshuvas HaRashba Hamyuchas LiHaRamban siman 232 which is brought in the Meiri's Kiryas ...


1

The variant i'm used to hearing is that daleth without a dagesh should sound like the "th" sound in the english word "the." Here is a video according to this tradition, a Mizrahi accent, non Yemenite. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSAu-wBvYHg


1

Like Matt said, every minyan I've been to has pronounced these as they sound (ramach, sh'sa, and taryag); the gabbai in my shul (a very learned rabbi) included*. * In the Mi Shebeirach for cholim.


1

I don't think any word in biblical Hebrew does this but technically a ט with a shewa followed by a ש constructs the same sound.


1

When a ה has no marked vowel on it, a Mappiq is used to tell you that the ה is still a consonant and therefore functions as the coda of the syllable (as opposed to being a mater lectionis and thereby functioning as part of the nucleus of the syllable). In the case of a furtive patach, the patach is technically before the ה so a Mappiq is still conventionally ...


1

In siman 142 siff 1 the Ramma explaining the Michaber concerning someone who made a mistake while reading the torah says that if the mistake he made doesn't change the meaning of the word we do not make him re-read the right way. The Mishna Berurah in siff kattan 4 gives an example, such as someone who adds or leaves out a letter where the word stays the ...


1

The only source that exists for the Zeicher/Zecher reading is the Mishna Berura, as discussed here. He only mentions this stringency for parshat Zechor, and not for parshat Ki Teitzei. As to your assertion that many have a minhag of saying both - I'm not convinced that it's accurate. For a start Sefardim and Yekkes have not adpated this Safek. BTW: Rabbi ...


1

From torah.org: Rambam rules (as is the ruling of the Gemara; see below) that both "audible" and "careful" reading of K'riat Sh'ma are desiderata L'khat'hilah but are not indispensable. The Mishnah in Berakhot (2:3) cites the following two disputes: "If someone read K'riat Sh'ma and did not hear his own reading, (R. Yehuda says:*) Yatza, R. ...


1

Onkelos translates: וַאֲמַר, לָא יַעֲקוֹב יִתְאֲמַר עוֹד שְׁמָךְ--אֱלָהֵין יִשְׂרָאֵל: אֲרֵי רָב אַתְּ קֳדָם יְיָ וְעִם גֻּבְרַיָּא, וִיכֵילְתָּא And he said 'No longer shall your name be called Jacob-- rather Israel: For you have contended before God and with man, and been able. So Elokim seems appropriate, per his translation. Targum Pseudo ...


1

Every qamatz at the last syllable with maqaf and another word must be qamats qatan, otherwise the baale hamassora would place a taam miqra in the word "kol".


1

Danno's answer pretty much covers it. I would also recommend:http://www.ramaz.org/nusach/index.html, especially for good Ashkenazi davening. If you want resources for leining (reading Torah), this is a good website: http://learntrope.com/


1

Also try "Virtual Cantor": http://www.virtualcantor.com. It has .mp3 files that can be downloaded.



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