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10

From what I can tell, either way you accent this word is probably fine. My understanding, based on Biblical grammar My understanding is that the accent in this case goes on the 'mo' syllable, due to the rule of "nasog achor." This rule says that when multi-syllabic Word A is followed (without disjunctive cantillation) by Word B, and Word B has an accent ...


7

The letters בגד כפת have two versions, one with Dagesh and one without. It gets a Dagesh after a closed syllable, or in the beginning of a word. In this instance, the previous word ends with an open syllable. Therefore the פ does not receive a Dagesh. What of many instances where we see a word-initial פ receive a Dagesh where the previous word ended with ...


6

Tosfot (Sukkah 5a s.v. Yod) says that saying "Yod - Hey" is ok if the intention is not for the name יה but as a abbreviation of the Tetragrammaton. This implies that they understand that spelling out the letters can be problematic as well.


6

My preferred method - tried when teaching both my sons their Bar Mitzva Parsha - is as follows. When the child makes an error, make them go back 2 - 3 words and restart correctly from there. This will help them correct the flow; otherwise they get used to saying the wrong thing - correcting it (or hearing you correct it) - and continuing. We learn this ...


4

According to this page at Chadrei Charedim, the correct pronunciation (as demanded by the strictures of Hebrew grammar) is with a patach. Indeed, this is true: consider the form of similar phrases that appear throughout Tanakh: Genesis 7:1 - בַדור הַזה (bador hazeh); Exodus 5:23 - לָעם הַזה (la'am hazeh); Leviticus 23:27 - לַחדש הַשביעי הַזה (lachodesh ...


4

Phonetic Background Recall that we can split words up into syllables, e.g. English "pronounciation" = "pro-nun-ci-a-tion". As is described in that Wikipedia article, an "open syllable" is a syllable which ends in a vowel and a closed syllable is one that ends in a consonant, e.g. in "pronunciation" the open syllables are "pro", "ci" and "a", while the ...


4

The HaEmek Dovor explains unexpected dageshim as an intensification of the meaning. Thus, in Gen 43:26 he says that: the dagesh in the Aleph indicates the strength of the bringing, to show that each one tried to present the gift with their own hand rather than have one or two of the brothers bring it on behalf of all of them. This was in order to show ...


4

Here is an image from the Machzor of Worms (from the 13th century) with Kal rather than Kol: However, please consider that it is written in a hodgepodge of Hebrew and Aramaic. Do you think that the word מיום כיפורים זה and הבא עלינו לטובה or שבועות are Aramaic? Ultimately, as long as we have the correct intent and are saying what has been established as a ...


3

It's very common in some of the manuscripts - for example, the codex of the Prophets from the Qaraite synagogue in Cairo, which was written by Moshe ben Asher. There, it features in every the occasional consonantal aleph (and might therefore be understood to be a mappiq). This is generally considered to have been a feature of the Palestinian vocalisation ...


3

A little phonetics background is needed to answer this question. Phoneticians usually transcribe sounds in languages using a set of symbols known as the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Phonetic transcriptions in the IPA are written in between square brackets [], so for example the word "beds" is transcribed in IPA as [bɛdz]. As you can see from the ...


3

The title and body of the question seem to be different, but: Based on Avot D'Rebbi Natan chapter 34, the Kesset HaSofer (second edition) 11:5 (Also written by R' Gansfried) brings a list of 10 Names of G-d that one may not erase. In addition to the names listed in the question, he adds the following 2 names: Y-ah E-hyey These names may not be erased ...


2

Yes, for sure: Forming the words with mouth, tongue, and lips without any hearable voice is sufficient after the event. Indeed, at least some chassidim hold that shmone esrei should not be audible at all. A "backhanded" voice cannot be worse than no voice at all. I checked my own reasoning by asking a couple of very learned and stringent people. They ...


2

The rule is as stated by others in the comments, that the Yud is part of the ending. As such, if breaking it up into parts, it would be most correct to portray the visualization of it as Ya-DA-Yim, as described by @Double AA. However, I believe it is incorrect to deliberately pronounce it that way - and by that I mean pronouncing it with deliberate emphasis ...


2

This is a thorny issue, and lots of poskim have dealt with the issue of havarot (pronunciation systems for Hebrew) -- you can see a nice summary here. I think the most lucid summary of the situation is given by Rav Moshe Feinstein in Igros Moshe OC 3:5. He explains that it's true that Hebrew had an original havara (pronunciation) that all the modern havarot ...


2

All Sephardic/Mizrahi (but not Yemenite) reading traditions distinguish qames qatan (pronounced as you point out approximately "o") from qames gadhol (pronounced as you point out approximately "a"). Most Ashkenazim, along with Yemenites, pronounce both approximately as "aw" in claw, draw. Some Ashkenazim pronounce qames gadhol as "aw" and qames qatan as ...


2

do you know of any good, preferably non-disruptive, ways to prevent such skipping while providing the correction or prompt required? Just some ideas: Sit down with your child not during a prayer and explain that such a prompt means that she should repeat the entire word. Explain why. Possibly augmented by: Immediately before the prayer, remind her of ...


2

Presumably from the gemarah Megillah 32a. ר' שפטיה אמר ר' יוחנן: one who reads the Torah without a pleasant voice,or one who learns Mishsnah without a tune...(gemarah brings a passuk about this person and compares it to sin). Tosfos explains they used to learn with a tune since they learned by heart and this way they remembered it. This seems to be a very ...


2

The issue is, as you may know, that there is not one 'standard' Sephardi pronunciation. There were a variety of traditional dialects for different 'edot — Moroccan, Baghdadi, Yemenite, Persian, etc... Then there's the generalized 'Sephardi' accent of modern Israeli Hebrew (à la Ovadia Yosef) and even general Israeli Hebrew which retains some 'Sephardi' ...


2

It's generally accepted that traditional pronunciation schemes for Hebrew are always halachically acceptable. The basic mekor for this is that the Gemara (e.g. Megillah 24b, brought down by the Shulchan Aruch) implies that there are halachic problems with pronouncing ayin as aleph. Numerous mefarshim qualify that this does not apply in a place where the ...


2

Yod, like most other letters, can only get a dot in it called a "dagesh chazak." This indicates that the affected consonant should be geminated, or doubled the way you would double, e.g. the 'b' sound in "subbasement." So, for the word in your example, שִיֵּץ, you would say "shiy-yatz" rather than "shiyatz," and your name would be pronounced "Chay-ya" ...


1

For many words in Tanakh that begin with he hayedia followed by mem-shewa, even though the mem lacks daghesh, the Masora prescribes shewa naʿ (mobile shewa), indicated by gaʿya on the preceding pathah. We should not at all assume that the words of the siddur were pronounced as they were in the Tanakh. The language (and pronunciation) of Hazal often ...


1

There are a few Sephardic communities which have a tradition to pronounce every qames in Aramaic as qames gadhol: e.g., kal nidre. (Even fewer retain this only in certain common phrases, like kal nidre, but there is probably no basis for this.) This may have developed as an over-correction: people had to be careful to say "ʿalam" and not "ʿolam" so they ...


1

Contrary to what the previous answer states, there can be a phonemic difference in many of these instances. If one pronounces an unaspirated /bet/ as a /waw/, for example, it might be mistaken for a conjunctive; if one usually differentiates between a /tav/ and a /sav/, the use of the former in a situation where the previous word sounds as though it ...


1

The Nefesh HaChaim in שער ב פרק יד writes the following: והענין שעבודת התפלה היא במקום עבודת הקרבן וכמו שענין הקרבן היה להעלות נפש הבהמה למעלה. וכל עיקר הכפר' היה תלוי בזריקת הדם הוא הנפש. וכן הקטרת הא מורים עיקרם היה לכוונת העלאת הנפש. כן עיקר ענין התפלה הוא. להעלות ולמסור ולדבק נפשו למעלה. כי כח הדבור של האדם נקרא נפש כמ"ש ויהי האדם לנפש חיה ות"א לרוח ...


1

As noted by others, Hebrew grammar calls for a noun (zeman) modified by a definite adjective (hazze) to itself be definite (although there are exceptions in Tanakh). Thus, "lazzeman hazze". (le + ha- + zeman = lazzeman) Note that the zayin has a daghesh and the shewa is na` (mobile). That is not to say, however, that "lizman hazzeh" is ungrammatical. ...



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