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8

As I learned in the various Aramaic language classes I took in Revel, the yud in these cases is silent, and only exists to show the plurality. The parallel is to Hebrew, where the yud appears after the segol, but is also entirely unpronounced. For example in אֲבוֹתֶיךָ, it is to be pronounced avotecha, not avoteycha.


8

It's one of 10 traditional exceptions to the rules of BeGeD KePeT recorded by the master masorete Ben Asher in his Dikdukei haTa'amim. Minchat Shai records two homiletic explanations: The second מי כמכה follows God's name and we don't want it to sound like we are declaring God to be a fellow named מיכה. The stronger form in the latter phrase indicates a ...


7

The letters בגד כפת have two versions, one with Dagesh and one without. It gets a Dagesh after a closed syllable, or in the beginning of a word. In this instance, the previous word ends with an open syllable. Therefore the פ does not receive a Dagesh. What of many instances where we see a word-initial פ receive a Dagesh where the previous word ended with ...


4

Phonetic Background Recall that we can split words up into syllables, e.g. English "pronounciation" = "pro-nun-ci-a-tion". As is described in that Wikipedia article, an "open syllable" is a syllable which ends in a vowel and a closed syllable is one that ends in a consonant, e.g. in "pronunciation" the open syllables are "pro", "ci" and "a", while the ...


4

It's very common in some of the manuscripts - for example, the codex of the Prophets from the Qaraite synagogue in Cairo, which was written by Moshe ben Asher. There, it features in every the occasional consonantal aleph (and might therefore be understood to be a mappiq). This is generally considered to have been a feature of the Palestinian vocalisation ...


4

The HaEmek Dovor explains unexpected dageshim as an intensification of the meaning. Thus, in Gen 43:26 he says that: the dagesh in the Aleph indicates the strength of the bringing, to show that each one tried to present the gift with their own hand rather than have one or two of the brothers bring it on behalf of all of them. This was in order to show ...


4

The RCA Madrich (rabbi's handbook) by Rabbi Benjamin Bulka has it vowelized.


4

Minchas Shay says it's a matter of dispute: יש מרז״ל מפרשים אותו קדש ויש מפרשים אותו חול עיין ב״ר וחולין פרק גיד הנשה ועיין מ״ש סוף פ׳ ויצא Some of our rabbis explain it as holy, and some explain it as secular. See B'reshis Raba and Chulin (the chapter Gid hanashe) and see what I wrote at the end of the section Vayetze. Following the links: ...


3

In Kitzur Yalkut Yosef 271:13, Ovadya Yosef rules that when it comes to kiddush and havdallah, there is no need to be concerned (kpeida) about different accents. An Ashkenazi fulfills his obligation by listening to a sefardi's recitation, and vice versa.


3

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein writes in the Igros Moshe Orach Chaim vol 5 siman 20 subsection 32 that it is more important to repeat it when reading it in parshas Ki Seitzei than in parshas Zachor. But, just for the record, the Vilna Gaon also repeated it during Ashrei, and no one seems to have accepted that practice.


3

https://archive.org/details/ReadingKesubah has an mp3 audio recording of it.


3

A little phonetics background is needed to answer this question. Phoneticians usually transcribe sounds in languages using a set of symbols known as the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Phonetic transcriptions in the IPA are written in between square brackets [], so for example the word "beds" is transcribed in IPA as [bɛdz]. As you can see from the ...


3

The Nefesh HaChaim in שער ב פרק יד writes the following: והענין שעבודת התפלה היא במקום עבודת הקרבן וכמו שענין הקרבן היה להעלות נפש הבהמה למעלה. וכל עיקר הכפר' היה תלוי בזריקת הדם הוא הנפש. וכן הקטרת הא מורים עיקרם היה לכוונת העלאת הנפש. כן עיקר ענין התפלה הוא. להעלות ולמסור ולדבק נפשו למעלה. כי כח הדבור של האדם נקרא נפש כמ"ש ויהי האדם לנפש חיה ות"א לרוח ...


3

He pronounced it "fajnʃtajn", as in both "ei"s sounding like "eye" and the "s" like an "sh". I am reporting a firsthand account of Rav Moshe using this pronunciation regularly.


3

Chacham Ovadia in Yechave Daas 6:siman 19 pg 110 writes that we are not makpid on accent pronunciation even for davening whether one is sefard or ashkanaz. However, when it comes to parshas Zachar and parshas Parah he writes one should listen from his style of pronunciation since its a d'orasia.


3

The book מפתח הדלת, by ישראל חיים (Chaim) Lenchitz, revised edition, 5766, quotes this from Radak's Michlol, though I don't know where it is in Michlol: צריך אדם להזהר ולהבדיל בין ו״ו ובית רפה That is: A person must be careful and distinguish between vav and light ves. The same book claims that Radak says the same (in the same place in Michlol) ...


2

This is a thorny issue, and lots of poskim have dealt with the issue of havarot (pronunciation systems for Hebrew) -- you can see a nice summary here. I think the most lucid summary of the situation is given by Rav Moshe Feinstein in Igros Moshe OC 3:5. He explains that it's true that Hebrew had an original havara (pronunciation) that all the modern havarot ...


2

The text is called Sfat Emet Siftei Kohen (שפת אמת שפתי כהן), and it was authored by R' Bentzion HaKohen. You can find copies for purchase here and here, although I regret that it's nearly impossible to find anything about it. It has nothing to do with the Gerrer Rebbe, and the pronunciation for which it serves as a guide has nothing to do with Gerrer ...


2

The issue is, as you may know, that there is not one 'standard' Sephardi pronunciation. There were a variety of traditional dialects for different 'edot — Moroccan, Baghdadi, Yemenite, Persian, etc... Then there's the generalized 'Sephardi' accent of modern Israeli Hebrew (à la Ovadia Yosef) and even general Israeli Hebrew which retains some 'Sephardi' ...


2

Yod, like most other letters, can only get a dot in it called a "dagesh chazak." This indicates that the affected consonant should be geminated, or doubled the way you would double, e.g. the 'b' sound in "subbasement." So, for the word in your example, שִיֵּץ, you would say "shiy-yatz" rather than "shiyatz," and your name would be pronounced "Chay-ya" ...


2

It's generally accepted that traditional pronunciation schemes for Hebrew are always halachically acceptable. The basic mekor for this is that the Gemara (e.g. Megillah 24b, brought down by the Shulchan Aruch) implies that there are halachic problems with pronouncing ayin as aleph. Numerous mefarshim qualify that this does not apply in a place where the ...


2

The opinion of the Minchat Shai (and most commentators, from what I can tell), is that a meteg on a short vowel in a closed syllable is almost always a euphonic meteg (there for stress or to stop you from swallowing a syllable, but not for the vowel quality), and thus does not affect the following shva. See also Geoffrey Khan's The Tiberian Pronunciation of ...


1

In siman 142 siff 1 the Ramma explaining the Michaber concerning someone who made a mistake while reading the torah says that if the mistake he made doesn't change the meaning of the word we do not make him re-read the right way. The Mishna Berurah in siff kattan 4 gives an example, such as someone who adds or leaves out a letter where the word stays the ...


1

The only source that exists for the Zeicher/Zecher reading is the Mishna Berura, as discussed here. He only mentions this stringency for parshat Zechor, and not for parshat Ki Teitzei. As to your assertion that many have a minhag of saying both - I'm not convinced that it's accurate. For a start Sefardim and Yekkes have not adpated this Safek. BTW: Rabbi ...


1

From torah.org: Rambam rules (as is the ruling of the Gemara; see below) that both "audible" and "careful" reading of K'riat Sh'ma are desiderata L'khat'hilah but are not indispensable. The Mishnah in Berakhot (2:3) cites the following two disputes: "If someone read K'riat Sh'ma and did not hear his own reading, (R. Yehuda says:*) Yatza, R. ...


1

Onkelos translates: וַאֲמַר, לָא יַעֲקוֹב יִתְאֲמַר עוֹד שְׁמָךְ--אֱלָהֵין יִשְׂרָאֵל: אֲרֵי רָב אַתְּ קֳדָם יְיָ וְעִם גֻּבְרַיָּא, וִיכֵילְתָּא And he said 'No longer shall your name be called Jacob-- rather Israel: For you have contended before God and with man, and been able. So Elokim seems appropriate, per his translation. Targum Pseudo ...


1

See grammar and pronunciation rules from Jewish Virtual Library. From my understanding of the rules, the correct pronunciation should be "keed-di-sha'-nu". Since there is a dot in the daled, it is considered as if it is doubled, i.e. - ending the 1st syllable and starting the 2nd one, as well. Offhand, I would say that sounding the 2nd syllable with a ...


1

Every qamatz at the last syllable with maqaf and another word must be qamats qatan, otherwise the baale hamassora would place a taam miqra in the word "kol".


1

Contrary to what the previous answer states, there can be a phonemic difference in many of these instances. If one pronounces an unaspirated /bet/ as a /waw/, for example, it might be mistaken for a conjunctive; if one usually differentiates between a /tav/ and a /sav/, the use of the former in a situation where the previous word sounds as though it ...


1

I recommend derechemet.com's audio dikduk classes.



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