Hot answers tagged

7

In the introduction of the Chovot Halevavot published by Mosad Harav Kook, he brings that it is not known how to pronounce the name. He says that Ashkenazim pronounce it Bechaye, and Sefardim pronounce it Bachye. See there for some other opinions and rationals as well.


7

R. Reuven Margalios in his פנינים ומרגליות has a note on this name. His theory is that it is not an actual name, but a nickname which means "may he live long," like the (Yiddish) name "Alter." He proves that it is not a real name because in a manuscript of Kad ha-Kemach, the author is listed as R. Yehuda. According to this, it would presumably be pronounced ...


6

It's a Dagesh Forte which indicates gemination of the consonant "w". So the word would be read something like Yiwwadha' with a prolonged /w/ sound. The word is in passive future third-person masculine singular and means "[he] will be known".


4

Many of your point are only relevant to Modern Hebrew, which is a distinct language from Biblical Hebrew, only the latter being a holy language. In fact, many orthodox Jews distance themselves from Modern Hebrew (to the point of prohibiting its use in their synagogues) because of what is deemed to be its inherent un-holiness. Nevertheless, let me address ...


3

Proper pronunciation and proper distinguishing of letters and vowels is halakha. How must one enunciate? He must be careful not to pronounce [a letter with] a strong dagesh as if there were no dagesh, or [a letter with] no dagesh as if there were one. Nor should one pronounce the silent sheva or silence the pronounced sheva. Hil. Kriath Shema' 2:9 and ...


3

The Hebrew language is considered the holy tongue, but not because it is ascetically pleasing from a grammarian's view point. It is holy because holy people use it to convey holy ideas, and it is ill suited (in its original incarnation) for speaking on profane matters. The Rambam writes: I have also a reason and cause for calling our language the holy ...


1

In Biblical Hebrew the words לֹא (lōʾ) and לֹו (lô) are homophonic. According to the Masorah of the Masoretic Text, there are two instances (1 Sam 2:16 and 1 Sam 20:2) where the לֹא (lōʾ) is to be understood in lieu of the written לֹו (lô). On the other hand, there are 17 instances where the לֹו (lô) is to be understood in lieu of the written לֹא (lōʾ). As ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible