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17

A real big one: אלוה (with a patach under the hei) - many people pronounce it: elohah, while the correct pronounciation is eloah (like noach, and not nocha).


15

It's one of 10 traditional exceptions to the rules of BeGeD KePeT recorded by the master masorete Ben Asher in his Dikdukei haTa'amim. Minchat Shai records two homiletic explanations: The second מי כמכה follows God's name and we don't want it to sound like we are declaring God to be a fellow named מיכה. The stronger form in the latter phrase indicates a ...


14

As I understand it, the markings of these shevas follow the rules given by R' Shlomo Zalman Hanau, an important 18th-century grammarian. In his system, every sheva following a tenuah kallah (a "light" vowel, i.e., one that substitutes for a sheva or a chataf vowel) is vocalized; examples include מַלְכֵי (since the independent form is מְלָכִים) and נֶעֶרְמוּ ...


13

Many, many kids when singing birkat hamazon out loud: "umeitiv lakol umeichin mazon le'echol b'riotav ..." G-d feeds us so He can then eat us up? Instead of: "umeitiv lakol umeichin mazon l'chol b'riotav ..." The problem is the standard "benching tune" tends to push this one.


12

Minchas Shai (to Gen. 30:18, the first place where the name appears) cites Radak, who says that it this is an example of elision: the sound of the second letter is combined into that of the first. As another example, he gives מחצצרים (I Chron. 15:24 and in a few other places in Chronicles), where the second צ is silent. That said, as Yahu noted, there are ...


12

The short answer is that modern yeshiva students recite it with a tzeirei because this is brought in the Mishna Berura which has become a very popular sefer for "p'sak". The Mishna Berura brought it because of the weight he gives to the Pri Megadim, who quotes this version in the name of R' Hanau. A more interesting and comprehensive background with ...


11

The following is adapted from Dovid Katz, "The Phonology of Ashkenazic," in Hebrew in Ashkenaz: A Language in Exile, ed. Lewis Glinert (Oxford University Press, 1993), pp. 61-65. Apparently, at least from the 16th century onwards, there was a distinction among (some) Ashkenazim between the sounds of kubbutz and shuruk, with the former being pronounced like ...


10

Mishne Halachos, "a summary of halachos" like in Mishne Tora, "a summary of Torah". The root is shin-nun-he: it's related to shana, "repeated". I've heard that after he allowed certain eruvin that R' Moshe Feinstein did not, people jokingly (and with quite a lack of k'vod hatora) referred to his books as M'shane Halachos, "changer of halachos". The root is ...


10

Often the problem is we see a familiar-looking word and our brains assume it's the word we know, rather than sounding it out carefully as it may be slightly different. E.g. a word that looks just like "edosav" but is actually "edvosav." The best example that I know of, though, is when the Chazzan takes the Torah back on shabbos; the congregation chimes in ...


10

There is a booklet called Minhagei Melech that purports to collect all of the Lubavitcher Rebbe's customs; it states (pp. 28 and 34) that he indeed repeated the word with both vocalizations. However: It's questionable how reliable these reports are (not just the ones in MM, but more generally, oral descriptions of what the Rebbe said or did); in some ...


10

This answer assumes you're talking about conversation. My theory is that Yiddish and English, being mostly accented on the penultimate syllable, shift Hebrew to the same in natural Yiddish/Yinglish/English speech. Thus kash-RUTH becomes KASH-rus. Then the vowel on the ultimate syllable gets compressed to a shwa. KASH-rəs, which sounds like KASH-rihs.


10

I highly doubt there is any significance to such a pronunciation (although I stand to be corrected) but since you ask, here is a technical explanation (based on here and here): There are two types of sounds - ones where you use your voice, like b, d, g, f and z, and ones where you don't like p, t, k, v, and s. The ones that you use your voice for are called ...


10

From what I can tell, either way you accent this word is probably fine. My understanding, based on Biblical grammar My understanding is that the accent in this case goes on the 'mo' syllable, due to the rule of "nasog achor." This rule says that when multi-syllabic Word A is followed (without disjunctive cantillation) by Word B, and Word B has an accent ...


9

Rabbi Bogomilsky compiles several opinions about how to say the name, including the ones mentioned in other answers. In short (see there for sources): Read with two "ש" until Bamidbar 26:24, then it is read with only one "ש". As Alex answered. Read with two "ש" the first time, after that it is only read with one. As Yahu answered. Chabad always reads it ...


9

Why is there a silent ש in the name Yissochor? The Daas Zkeineem tells us the reason Layoh put two letters of ש in t Yissochor: One for the שכר-reward for giving Zilpoh to Yaakov as a wife, the second for giving the flowers that were to help Rochail become pregnant. To reveal the story of the flowers, however, would possibly embarrass Rochail. In order ...


9

"zecher lemaase bereshit" in the "magen avot" of shabbos, should be "zecher lemaase vereshit"


9

In this recent blog post, Rabbi Ari Enkin paraphrases Israel Rubin in "The How & Why of Jewish Prayer" explaining that the correct pronunciation of the Tetrargrammaton was lost during the Second Temple Period.


8

Yissachar in general represents the study of Torah. Many of the members of the Sanhedrin, the Jewish supreme court, were of the tribe of Yissaschar. It is said that Zebulun brought in the cash and supported Yissachar in their study. It was a partnership of sorts. Now the Torah has two parts to it: the revealed and the hidden, or the legalistic and the ...


8

Very simple. Due to the influence of Zionism and the state of Israel, where such pronunciation was adopted, the conservatives copied it at some point.


8

According to Rabbi Jeremy Weider (in his Introduction to Bible course, which can be found on YUTorah.org) it is a kri u'ketiv. Because this is a common kri u'ketiv it is written in the text without note (like the spelling of naarah without the final hey and other examples).


8

ספר ישׁעיה פרק מ פסוּק לא וְקוֹיֵ ד' יַחֲלִיפוּ כֹחַ is often mispronounced as וְקוֹוֵי ד' יַחֲלִיפוּ כֹחַ


8

Literally it means "He (i.e. Hashem) should straighten your energy." It means that Hashem should guide you in choosing actions that will allow your energy to flow on a straight path from its source on high down to you. It is correctly pronounced "Yi/Ya/sher Ko/cha/cha". Its Yiddish pronunciation is "Ya/shi/koi/yach".


8

The expression is taken from the Talumd (Shabbat 87a and several other locations). The sage Resh Lakish expands the word "אשר" to the now ubiquitous "ישר כחך" . You can see from the following Talmudic excerpt (Shabbat 87a) that the original use was to validate Moshe Rabeinu's action. It would seem to me that current usage is quite the same. When one ...


8

I haven't vetted these but they might be worth working through http://www.kehilathadar.org/content/davening-audio-files http://sidduraudio.com/ http://www.toraschaimdallas.org/resources/weekday-davening-2/ I just ran a google search and found a bunch. I also know that too much information can be as problematic as too little. You should ask your Rabbi to ...


8

As I learned in the various Aramaic language classes I took in Revel, the yud in these cases is silent, and only exists to show the plurality. The parallel is to Hebrew, where the yud appears after the segol, but is also entirely unpronounced. For example in אֲבוֹתֶיךָ, it is to be pronounced avotecha, not avoteycha.


7

"A sin is just a samech with three branches." -- A contemporary American ראש ישיבה The idea here is that in modern usage they are both actually interchangeable with samech. For an illustration of this interchangeability see the 15th line of the alphabetical acrostic א-ל אדון, in which a sin appears where we would expect a samech, or the common ...


7

See this YU lecture and I believe this one summarizing it. Rabbi Moshe Feinstein wrote that all pronunciations are legitimate (even vis-a-vis the chalitza ceremony, which must be performed in Hebrew), and added that there's no way to tell which are more accurate than any other. (Which may sound naive to some linguists.) Rabbi J. David Bleich, ...


7

I have never seen a siddur that has TOras. The correct pronunciation, as far as I know, is toRAS. In general, the only reason a mil'ra word, such as toRAS, would become mil'ail, is if the word following it had its accent on its first syllable. For example, if the term was "toras chesed", it would be "TOras CHEsed", as the accent in "chesed" is on the first ...


7

Apparently, it's due to a misinterpretation of the m'sora. By the rules of grammar, both should be mil'el, but, according to the m'sora, both are mil'ra. The m'sora was misinterpreted to mean that hoshia is mil'el while hatzlicha is mil'ra, and that's the way people read it now. Source: an old mesorah-listserv thread on the topic, in particular one message ...


7

Chanoch and Ariel K are correct in their answer, but one can answer at greater length and detail. The letters beged kefet, בגד כפת are distinguished from other Hebrew letters in taking a dagesh kal, a 'weak' dagesh, at the start of words or after a shva nach. The function of this dagesh kal is to distinguish between the plosive and fricative versions of the ...



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