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15

Well it took me almost a year, but I can now answer my own question. In Person The National Library of Israel has everything (and I mean everything) you could ever want when it comes to Hebrew books. Although they don't allow people to check out their rare books, you can sit in the reading room and read anything in their collection for as long as you like. ...


9

I have found two good locations. soc.culture.jewish.moderated check out the FAQ (I helped write it) The unmoderated version was originally very good, but we had to switch to moderated because of the spam anti-semites. Mail Jewish Welcome to the mail-jewish mailing list! This mailing list was founded in 1986 for the purpose of discussing Jewish topics ...


9

A "mezuzah" as we use the term is made up of 2 items -- the parchment inside and the case which the rest of the world sees. While we often spend time and money trying to get a nice case -- something pretty, and worthy of being shown off (or durable, depending on which door you are putting it on) the case is almost irrelevant. The essence is the parchment ...


8

Highly recommended is The Living Torah by the late Rabbi Arye Kaplan. It's translated into modern English - no thee, thy and thou. He brings numerous interpretations in the footnotes where available. He has broken each chapter into sub-chapters - each with its own heading. He brings lots of maps and charts and images. Apparently it's online here. ...


7

For a Jewish translation of Nach (Tanach minus the Five Books of Moses) with a compendium of commentaries, I recommend the Judaica Press Prophets and Writings1. I have found that its English summary of commentaries on each verse reliably includes readable paraphrases or direct translations of the most interesting or useful comments of the classical ...


7

Rabbi Ribiat's "39 Melochos" that you mention is lucid, comprehensive, and well-sourced, yet is also broken down into very digestible bites, which is why it has become so popular in the English-speaking world. (We've often used it as a basis for table discussions.) He begins sections with more general basic background pieces before he gets into more detailed ...


7

YUTorah.org has free, streaming Torah reading recordings by R' Jeremy Weider. He enunciates and intones extremely clearly. He performs the two features you're looking for: The masa'ot start at 06:00 in his Laining for Matot Mas`ei Part 4. 35:5, with the unusual trop, starts at 02:07 in his Laining for Matot Mas`ei Part 6.


7

Two additional thoughts in addition to Danno's answer Many doors in the house need a mezuza (see here for details) - I realize it might sound a bit daunting if you are "just starting" but "no one should ignore the law" - the main door of the house should be the first one to start with A second trusted online source is stam.net - both them and Hasofer ...


6

I have never actually used it as my sukka is built on cement, but you can get Campsite flooring (For example, maybe in a different color or a different option). Many of these camp mats dry quickly, allow water to drain properly, can be staked down, and shouldn't kill your grass (hopefully). Edit: Here is a link where you can actually buy the stuff. Edit ...


6

maybe this is what you're looking for: https://orajhaemet.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/1.pdf if you want, here is the complete text , i think there's a parasha missing , but the rest is complete: http://www.orajhaemeth.org/p/blog-page_25.html


6

You might want to check out the ArtScroll Stone Chumash (no, it's not written on rocks). It contains all of the Torah in Hebrew with a translation, plus Rashi in Hebrew. But what really makes it good for you is the rest of the commentary. They anthologize a whole bunch of the classic Rabbinic commentaries, in English. They of course cite whoever they are ...


6

I just saw your question and wanted to let you know there is an online safrut course starting on November 15th. All the information can be found here: http://mastery.webyeshiva.org/safrut-certification/


6

My dining room is such a forum during Friday night supper and Shabas lunch. It's well-run IMO in that anyone can say his piece but there's an emcee (me). And I like to think the emcee is respectful of halacha.


5

I didn't find a good source for this information, so we (at Sefaria.org) analyzed our text, did some pattern recognition, corrected by hand, double checked, and came up with an authoritative mapping between the Mishnah and the Babylonian Talmud. Line numbers here refer to the segmentation in Sefaria's online Talmud.


5

Siddur Besamim Rosh Nusach Ashkenaz & Nusach Sefard is an interlinear Siddur. They can be purchased brand new at Jewish Used Books.


5

As noted in this answer, the Stone Chumash is a good starting point. It brings classical Jewish commentaries, verse by verse. This is one example of a category. A chumash is an edition of the five books of torah with (Jewish) commentaries. Lots of editors have published them; the commentaries included vary. (A book that included all the commentaries ...


5

Sefaria.org has the complete Ramban on the Torah online for free in Hebrew, with a small minority of sections so far community-translated into English: Genesis Exodus Leviticus Numbers Deuteronomy They have a channel for submitting requests for translation of specific sections, and the requests are put on a queue for community translation.


5

Minhagei Lita (Customs of Lithuanian Jewry) by Rabbi Menachem Mendel Poliakoff.


5

There are many series of such books, a few I like are R Daniel Mann from Eretz Hemda has a very nice series called Living the halachic process (also available one of them also available on Kindle) - you can sample some online as part of the OU Vebbe Rebbe series (I cannot find the table of contents, try varying the number in the URL) R Ari Enkin has ...


5

One very notable work of rationalist Jewish philosophy is (Hanivchar) B'emunot V'deot by Rav Saadya Gaon. Written in Arabic in the 10th century, it is the first systematic presentation and philosophic foundation of the dogmas of Judaism. The full text of a 20th century Hebrew translation can be found here. Another very notable rationalist work is the ...


5

Actually, the standard English translations of all of the books you mentioned were done from the Arabic, not from a Hebrew intermediary: Rosenblatt's Book of Beliefs and Opinions, Pines' Guide of the Perplexed, Mansoor's Book of Direction to the Duties of the Heart.


4

This isn't quite in print, but you can see the Rosh Hashanah one in full here: http://hebrewbooks.org/42793 The others may be online, too.


4

Yes, the Oz veHadar edition does have the Mishnas Sofrim as does the edtion published by Moznaim.


4

They are all available here: Bereishis Shemos Vayikra Bemidbar Devarim


4

First of all, the Treatise of the Pool is the only known literary composition of R. Ovadiah Maimonides. It is a relatively obscure treatise written during the Jewish-Sufi movement in 13th century Egypt, and became known due to modern scholarly research. Paul Fenton has published a translation of the Judaeo-Arabic (and includes the original) from the archived ...


4

Kol Dodi on the Haftaros, by Rabbi David Feinstein. According to the publisher: In this masterpiece, the Rosh Yeshivah introduces each Haftarah, explains its historical context where necessary, shows its relationship to the Parashah, and offers an enlightening commentary in his own unique, original manner.


4

http://kiddushhachodesh.com/ has many videos decently done.


4

My personal favorite to share at the Shabbos table is The Shabbos Kitchen by Rabbi Simcha Bunim Cohen and his entire Shabbos Halacha series. Each chapter generally begins with a overview of the principles involved followed by a sampling of practical applications. Each part is followed by a summary. I have used it at the Shabbos table and my family ...


4

Check out The 39 Avoth Melacha of Shabbath by Rabbi Baruch Chait. It is designed for children, with the entire book being pictures. Each quarter of a page deals with a melacha, with pictures of different forms of the melacha around. It shows for each action whether it is d'oraita, d'rabbanan, or permitted. It does not delve into the reasons much (at all), ...


4

This is a link to an English translation of Pirkei Avot (Teachings of Our Fathers). Pirkei Avot is one of the texts that is widely studied and it seems to meet your requirements.



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