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6

Before you mentioned the English requirement, I would have suggested the articles published here, and since they're good articles, I'm going to keep them as part of the answer anyway. Additionally, in Hebrew, there is the great book by Yisrael Yuval, חכמים בדורם... but since you're looking for books in English, I'm afraid the only one that I know of is ...


5

I've used Tfilon for a few years and really like it. It passes your shalom rav test. It has options for ashkenaz, sepharad, and eidei hamizrach. It is also very flexible - you can add names for holim, select which day(s) you celebrate purim, etc. It also auto calculates the special things like shir shel yom, yaaleh v'yavo, and other day specific things. It ...


4

Here is a link to Service of the Synagogue by the Hebrew Publishing Company. Here is a link to Yom Rishon that you can cut and paste.


4

Generally with other ulta-orthodox baalei t'shuva or other people with similar backgrounds. That is a good idea, regardless, as the compatibility is more likely to be there. (The only exception to your list is persons of color - my observation is that they tend to find a person of a different color who doesn't have a hangup about it). In addition, There are ...


4

It seems that David Aaron deSola's siddur is the one that is commonly used today in these communities. It is available online.


4

I think כף החיים might be the best analogy. example page


2

Mishna Berura Tiferet Hamizrach is a project that has started a few years ago. So far there is one volume on Chanuka. There is a team of Talmidei Chachomim working on it and they anticipate having the entire Mishna Berura over the coming years. This includes the following Sefardi Poskim. פרי חדש, ברכי יוסף ומחזיק ברכה, מאמר מרדכי, מטה יהודה, שולחן גבוה, רוח ...


2

I'll offer two approaches in this answer, a more-complex one based on a structure that I have actually helped build, and a less-complex one that's more speculative. I have not actually built either of these as a sukkah; I'm drawing on related experience, but you'll need to do some work yourself to get from this to a plan for a finished sukkah. With luck ...


2

Many baal-teshuva yeshivas in Israel specialize in making shiduchim, often between their talmidim and an affiliated girls' seminary. For example, I attended a yeshiva in Jerusalem made up mostly of baalei teshuva (already frum; not a kiruv yeshiva). During my time there, many students became engaged and married, often to students at the yeshiva's sister ...


2

A couple of options that have worked for me in the past: Ebay is your friend. I'm currently seeing a few dozen single volumes for sale there, although obviously the selection will fluctuate. I've had good luck getting single volumes at used book sales and used book stores. Stores that focus exclusively on new books won't be much help here. What metro area ...


1

Online you can contact http://www.jewishusedbooks.com/ which sells individual volumes. In Lakewood there is a Sefarim store in the basement of the Capital Hotel that sells used Sefarim and sells many individual volumes.


1

If you live in NYC, Beigeleisen (sp?) on 16th avenue in Brooklyn, and the other store two doors down from them (forget the name) both sell used sefarim out-of-set.


1

Wow! A Lewandowski fan, like me! I thought I'd never find one! I learned and sang some of his compositions when I was part of the Yeshiva Univ. cantorial choir, years ago. I recommend that you contact the Belz School of Jewish Music, as I'm quite certain that someone there may point you in the right direction. Cantor Bernard Beer is still directing it and ...


1

There are many Shidduch sites out there. The very fact that they exist show that people are "falling out of the system" of using a Shadchan. One such site (which I know made a shidduch for my brother-in-law) is Saw You at Sinai. I could wax eloquently about the importance of a good Shadchan, etc., but unfortunately for many people they don't have access to ...


1

I can find no foods that are particularly appropriate for the holiday. In all the descriptions of the day, see for example here there is no mention of special foods (remarkably for a Jewish festival). Tu B'Av certainly has links to marriage and matchmaking which explains the reference to wedding cake above. The nights begin to get longer from Tu B'Av ...


1

Birkhot Shamayim by Rabbi Yosef Dweck provides an index of what Berachot to make on which foods, and the Sephardi laws of Berakhot.


1

Many years ago, a group of us were in a summer camp for a convention. A chattan who got lost trying to find the camp he was supposed to go to, abandoned his car on the road b/c Shabbat was approaching, and walked up the hill to the first camp he found, which was ours. Lucky, someone was there as it was technically after the normal camp season, and we had ...



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