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15

With the early machines in the late 1800s, they'd have a giant roller cranking out a huge flat sheet of dough, then use big cookie-cutters on it. If you used round cookie-cutters, you'd either have to throw away all the dough in between the circle shapes, or would feel pressured to rework it within the 18 minutes, which is going to be hard to do. Therefore ...


14

Someone has to say it. Judaism.SE Mi.Yodeya.com!


14

Others have stated some good ones, which I won't repeat. Some more: http://hebrewbooks.org: various texts as PDFs, many of which are not elsewhere online AFAIK. Some of them have OCR (I don't know how good it is), but most AFAICT do not. Nonetheless, they're good if you know the title (or author, which you can also search by) you seek, and don't need to ...


14

The JPS 1917 translation is public domain. It can be found at http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt0.htm among other places.


14

I just had a nice long chat on their website with Chaim Rosenberg, the director The Society for the Preservation of Hebrew Books. He said they are currently working on a new HebrewBooks drive, that should be available soon. So apparently, there is none available now. He was not sure if the new one would be on-site or in-stores. Based on that, I'd say it'll ...


13

You might want to check out mi.yodeya.com, the Judaism site on the StackExchange network. They allow questions and even answers from anyone, but the community editing and voting process, along with the great crowd of people who tend to hand out there tends to result in excellent, well-sourced answers being posted fairly quickly for most questions. Full ...


13

http://dafyomireview.com/article.php?docid=339


12

If you're just starting a Jewish library, and don't have a good idea already about what you need, then you probably weren't raised with enough Jewish background to fully sort out the list above. (And may not have such a good command of Hebrew.) In that case, a reasonable list would include (in approximate order): ArtScroll Chumash Siddur ArtScroll (Nusach ...


12

Online Texts: Mechon Mamre, he.wikisource.org, Hebrew Books, Chumash - Rabbi Kaplan Translation Blogs: Hirhurim, Text & Texture, parshablog, Cross Currents, Emes ve-Emunah Shiurim: YU Torah, Virtual Beit Midrash, Daf Yomi Advancement Forum, Torah.org, Aish, AishDas Q & A: Judaism.SE, Ask Moses, Jewish Answers


12

Aside for all those already mentioned, I find these websites very useful (probability says I visit most of these 1/week) Edited: Added descriptions of value More Shiurim: Kol Halahoson, TorahAnytime, MP3Shiur, 613 - Some of these have my favorite speakers so I keep updated by downloading their latest shiurim (on a weekly basis) Brochos - If I don't ...


12

Artscroll is currently making travel-sized paperback English Gemaras. Each only has about 1 or 2 chapters. Size: 7" x 10" There's also a "personal-sized" paperback Oz Vehadar. Size: 6.5 X 9.5 Blum Edition paperback travel Gemara. Size: 5.25" X 8.25" Historically, after WWII the Vaad Hatzalah printed pocket sized Gemaras for survivors in the refugee ...


12

I would recommend William Wickes' treatise on the Taamei Emet. You are describing a revia mugrash, as distinct from a revia gadol or revia katon. It is indeed a disjunctive accent: To really understand its function, you should familiarize yourself with Wickes' description of the continuous dichotomy. But the pasuk is first divided at the etnachta (or ...


12

I suggest Ishei Hatanach / Encyclopedia Of Biblical Personalities Anthologized from the Talmud, Midrash, and Rabbinic writings by Yishai Chasidah. It's an Artscroll product.


11

I'm sure I'll miss some important things, but here's a list of what I'd consider essential (or at least very useful). I'm going to write for the English speaker, since that's what I'm used to. I'm community-wikifying this answer, so anyone with 100 reputation points can edit it. I'm going to type this out without links at first and come back in and linkify ...


11

Quick Google brings http://twitter.com/kinbot The Kinneret Bot! Also see: http://savethekinneret.com/ (chart is a bit messy, though) http://www.israelweather.co.il/kineret.asp (in hebrew)


11

If such matzos are rare or nonexistent, it's because they don't fit as well in a box and thus require either a round box, which costs more to make and assemble, or both more box space per matza, taking up valuable room in shipping etc., and empty space in each box, increasing the likelihood of breaking matzos. Source (so to speak): conjecture.


11

I don't know of a book that records all of his judgments. However, there is one story brought in the Talmud (Sanhedrin 6b (English)): "And David did judgment and kindness" (Samuel 2 8:16). They ask: How can there be judgment and kindness together? They answer that the way he ruled was doing judgment to one of the parties and kindness to the other: He would ...


11

I found this website online: http://www.tanakhprofiles.org/showentries.php.


11

I think the most complete indexing book of that kind is תורה הכתובה והמסורה by אהרן הימן. It's published by דביר in three volumes. It goes through the whole Bible verse by verse, giving for each verse a list of locations in Talmud and Midrash where the verse is mentioned in some way. It's available on HebrewBooks: vol 1 (torah) vol 2 (nevi'im) vol 3 ...


10

http://www.aish.com/atr/ http://www.dinonline.org/ask-the-rabbi/ http://www.chabad.org/asktherabbi/default_cdo/jewish/Ask-the-Rabbi.htm


10

No edition of the Torah I have seen has included the commentaries M'tzudas David or M'tzudas Tziyon, but that does not prove anything. However, the author of both, in his introduction says the following, implying that the commentary is written specifically on (and beginning with) the N'vi'im (text is from this paper on the commentaries and the translation is ...


9

A good place to start would be here, on Hebrew Wikisource. It looks like their texts would meet all of your criteria.


9

For Choshen Mishpat and ribis questions, I've had the Business Halacha Institute recommended to me. It has an ask-the-rabbi service (via e-mail or, I think, phone) it calls "Halacha Hotline".


9

For all sh'eilos, if one does not have a personal rav, or one's rav is not available, Star-K initiated the "Institute of Halacha", run by R' Mordechai Frankel of Baltimore and endorsed by R' Moshe Heinemann. Questions may be emailed or called in during certain hours. See here for email address and phone number.


9

I was a paramedic for a long time. The one frum woman I knew who did this work wore a baseball cap with the EMS department LOGO on it as part of the "uniform". In the winter she wore a winter hat with the same logo. She had reletively short hair that all fit into the caps.


8

When I was bar-mitzvah (in 1985), CDs of Torah texts - like Bar Ilan, Tanach Plus, etc. - were years in the future. State of the art then, for portable texts, was microfilm/microfiche. So someone got me a kit (the size of a briefcase) containing a handheld reader, and microfiche cards of a number of basic sefarim (Gemara, Rambam, Shulchan Aruch, etc.); those ...


8

At the risk of being boring, the Bartenura Moscato ("blue bottle") is usually well-received. Mevushal. Easy to find at most kosher wine places these days. For those who prefer something Israeli, there's the Carmel analogue (yes mevushal) of the "blue bottle", and the Gamla (non-mevushal).


8

If I told you, then it wouldn't be a secret. ;) But anyway, one secret ingredient is Shabbos. See Shabbat 119a: The emperor said to R. Joshua b. Hanania,29 'Why has the Sabbath dish such a fragrant odour?' 'We have a certain seasoning,' replied he, 'called the Sabbath, which we put into it, and that gives it a fragrant odour.' 'Give us some of it,' ...


8

The Chofetz Chaim Heritage Foundation has a number you can call with halachic questions relating to sh'mirat halashon, or proper speech. It's 718-951-3696, and it's available from 9:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.



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