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28

In this interview with Terry Gross (around 5:08), those lyrics' author, Sheldon Harnick, says that he basically made up syllables that he thought would "give the effect" of "Chassidic chanting," despite not being familiar with such chanting from his own background. The first person to play Tevye, Zero Mostel, then replaced the syllables Harnick had written ...


15

It might be because the Written Torah doesn't really go much into the topic. (Why that is so is a whole other question.) So people may have incorrectly concluded that these ideas weren't originally part of Judaism. Another possibility is that they mean that we don't believe in the popular conception of Heaven (angels with harps) or of Hell (fiery lakes, ...


11

The idea that most talk about is that Judaism's gehinom is not a place for the damned as the christian hell is. It's spiritual rehabilitation. Although not everyone is zoche to this- I'm not privy to their fate. Suggested reading with a Rebbi: Derech Hashem. "Gan Eden" and "Gehinom" are our labels for a spiritual phase, not the actual Gan Eden/Gehinom ...


10

There are videos of the Lubavitcher Rebbe encouraging whistling by his farbrengens. Edited to add some great links from the comments into the answer, as well as other sources: Here is a picture of the Rebbe's often-used hand motion to signal for whistling. Here is a link to a first-hand account of the Rebbe encouraging someone to sing, along with a ...


9

He is reciting Numbers 6:24-26 (he only gets through half of the last verse in that clip): The LORD bless thee, and keep thee; The LORD make His face to shine upon thee, and be gracious unto thee; The LORD lift up His countenance upon thee, and give thee peace. This is known as the Priestly Blessing and it is sometimes used when parents bless ...


8

It says clearly in Hilchos Shabbos that it is Muttar (Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim Siman 338:1). I don't know of anybody who argues.


7

The Lubavitcher Rebber writes that Television is forbidden because: It is so immodest, that even non-Jews started campaigning against it. It incites people to violence. (Watching movies with people killing each other causes one to think about murder). One will not be able to tell his children to watch only "kosher" material, as they will answer back "but ...


6

The letter from those Gedolei Yisrael regarding television was received differently by different people. It could be it was meant as a teshuvah but the reality that it was written in is not the reality today so many statements within it need to be taken in context. That they actually held that the television itself (the actual physical thing) was a toeivah ...


6

Rav Moshe held it was assur (forbidden) to go to movies and theaters. Rav Nebontzol (Rav of the old city of Yerushalayim and Talmid (student) of Rav Shlomo Zalman) writes in his Mishna Brura (B'Yitzchak Yikrah) in chelek 6 in the back (hanhagos v'minhagim number 3) that Television is assur.


6

Ditto Alex's reference, "the rich get richer and the poor get poorer." Though that could simply be a comment on economics. As far as birds of the feather flocking together, we find Bava Kamma 92b: א"ל רבא לרבה בר מרי מנא הא מילתא דאמרי אינשי מטייל ואזיל דיקלא בישא גבי קינא דשרכי אמר ליה דבר זה כתוב בתורה שנוי בנביאים ומשולש בכתובים ותנן במתניתין ותנינא ...


5

It may also be related to the popular adage "Poverty follows the poor," mentioned in the Gemara (Bava Kamma 92a, bottom, and in a couple of other places).


5

I think it's somewhat related to the Lubavitcher maxim, Tracht gut, ven zayn gut.


5

I had a high-school rebbe (sophisticated in both Jewish and worldly matters, by the way) who was very against whistling at any time, because he had learned from his rebbe (I forget who, unfortunately) that it would attract demons. He would say in Yiddish "Yidden fife nisht," or "Jews don't whistle." I don't remember him distinguishing between night and day. ...


5

I have the kuntres Davar Bito which discusses this topic. Some of the issues include: Not to follow after your eyes. Not to bring a Toeivah (disgusting thing) into your home.


5

Edom is considered by the Rabbis to be the Roman Empire, and while contemporary Western culture isn't Roman per se, it is directly descended from Roman culture and ideas. Sources: It's stated here - http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0006_0_05562.html - that the late Tanaic and Amoraic Rabbis identified Edom as the founders of ...


4

(This answer is given without any references to actual sources -- just the colloquial understanding. The actual picture differs somewhat, for example, in Derech Hashem.) Christians believe hell is eternal. Jews believe that gehinnom is not (at least for the most part) -- one spends a maximum of 12 months in gehinnom being purified of his sins, and then ...


3

Supplementing, not supplanting, others' answers, may be the fact that our idea of what sends one to hell/paradise is different from Christians', who believe (as I understand it) in a default of going to hell. Perhaps that's why they think of us as not believing in hell.


3

Look in Shaarei Halacha U'Minhag (Kehos) for The Lubavitcher Rebbe's letters on why one cannot have a TV.


2

Perceptions of Judaism in popular culture are not often based on scrupulous study of Jewish sources. The reason for the perception is because a vast majority of Jews belong to liberal denominations that do not want to talk about hell. In fact, the "Pittsburgh Platform" of Reform Judaism rejected belief in hell as foreign to Judaism: We reassert the ...


2

Unlikely. Ahimsa is from the Sanskrit for non-violence: Origin: Sans ahimsā, non-injury < a-, not + himsā, injury < IE *ĝheis-, to wound < base *ĝhei-, to hurl, projectile. Hamsa is the Arabic for "five", and since the hand has five fingers (or four + a thumb, for the pedants), it is an obvious connection. Now, the origin of the hamsa symbol is a ...


2

I did not see the show but we have this type of bed. One bed is stationary and is connected to the headboard while the other bed is moveable. The movable bed looks like it's attached to the headboard when you move it but it's not. In reality the movable bed is it's own bed and you could even put it in another room and it wouldn't look strange but the ...


1

See Tshuvas Yaavetz Chelek 1 Siman 46 where he asserts that the assumption that Italy is Edom is so strong and well known (even to all non-Jews) that he suggest against marrying a convert from Italy and surrounding countries until the third generation. Also see the Gemara in Avoda Zara 11b, the bizarre spectacle performed in Rome to symbolize Esav ...


1

This article addresses the question. If the two mattresses share the same "base" (which I read as the commonly used term "bed-frame"), then it is a problem. It is only not a problem if the outer rim of the headboard/footboard of the bed are not connected to a common base. I don't know what show you are referencing, but if I understand you correctly, the ...


1

For Sephardim: Allowed on Shabbat and other days, but not in public. Source: Daily Halacha by R. Eli Mansour says The Halachic authorities rule that whistling was not included at all in the decree against producing sounds on Shabbat, and one may thus whistle a tune on Shabbat. We should note that irrespective of the laws of Shabbat, whistling in public, ...


1

When I was in his shiur from 2009-2011, HaRav Mordechai Machlis shlit"a said over a maaseh shehaya about when he was applying to enroll one of his daughters (not sure which one) in a certain haredi seminary. On the application, there was a question about ownership of television in the home of the student. Any girl who lived in a home containing a ...



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