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14

Yes, the painting is based on a popular picture of the Chofetz Chaim, which can be seen in The Schwadron Collection of the National Library of Israel (Jerusalem). The archive lists the picture as following: A photo portrait of Rabbi Israel Meir Cohen ("Chafetz Chaim"): printed silver, black and white, 7X12 cm. Portfolio also includes a copy of this ...


8

Iggros Moshe Even Haezer 1:69 applies the prohibition of seeing immodestly dressed women/men to seeing inappropriate behavior, with the reasoning that the problem is the thought process it instigates. Based on this logic he applies it to images in films, and even reading about inappropriate activity in books. So if these drawn images conjure up ...


6

A friend of mine is a friend of the Eliyashiv family. He spoke to Rabbi Binyamin Eliyashiv, who said that only two portraits hung in the apartment -- one of the Rav's grandfather, the Lashem, zt'l, and the other of his father-in-law, Rabbi Aryeh Levin, zt'l. My contact did not show the video to Rabbi Binyamin, but he did show it to rabbaim at Teferes ...


6

OK, I may have enough of an idea to offer an answer. I think the panel in the upper right is supposed to say כינור שפילט, like "harpist" or something in Yiddish. The upper middle seems to say something about a harp. The upper left says מאנדלן, Yiddish for almonds. I think the lower right might be א ליד, "a song." The lower middle says "baa..." I don't know ...


6

Per Torah.org Contemporary poskim debate whether taking a photograph of the sun or the moon is similar to drawing a flat image. Several rule stringently on this issue. There is an Igros Moshe Orach Chaim 5 - 9:6 that discusses this, however I am not able to find it online. Minchas Yitzchok 10:72 seems to prohibit it, however says it may be ...


4

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/912361/jewish/Chapter-Three.htm Halacha 10: It is forbidden to make decorative images of the human form alone. Therefore, it is forbidden to make human images with wood, cement, or stone. This [prohibition] applies when the image is protruding - for example, images and sculptures made in a hallway and the ...


4

When Tzivos Hashem was founded, the Lubavitcher Rebbe asked Michel Shwartz to draw a logo for it. In its first draft, he included a picture of the sun and the moon (I've seen a copy a while ago. The sun was (IIRC) a full circle inside the red part of the Tzaddik and a (waxing/waning crescent) moon inside the blue part). The Rebbe told him to remove the moon ...


4

The Rambam ruled in Hilkhos A.Z. 3:18 אסור לצור דמות חמה ולבנה כוכבים ומזלות ומלאכים, שנאמר "לא תעשון, איתי" (שמות כ,יט)--לא תעשון כדמות שמשין המשמשין לפניי במרום, ואפילו על הלוח. it is forbidden to fashion the likeness of the sun, the moon, the stars, the constellations, or the angels, as it is said (Ex. 20:19): "Do not make with Me [gods of ...


4

Making a permanent visual record is generally considered a form of "writing"; this includes film photography. From http://www.yutorah.com/_materials/Source_Sheet-510279.pdf : ר' יצחק וויס, שו"ת מנחת יצחק חלק ג סימן כ בתשו' קרן לדוד שם, כתב בפשיטות לענין המצייר צורה על ידי פאטאגראפיע דחייב משום תולדה דכותב Minchat Yitzchak (Responsa of R. ...


4

No. I don't have any sources but one can definitely see pictures of uncovered hair of brides in wedding photos posted proudly in the homes of great rabbis.


3

Shulchan Aruch HaRav writes (O.C. 307:30) (quoting Shulchan Aruch O.C. 307:16): ובדברי חשק יש עוד איסור אפילו כתובים בלשון הקודש שמגרה יצר הרע בעצמו ומי שחיברן ומי שהעתיקן ואין צריך לומר המדפיסן הם בכלל מחטיאי הרבים In arousing literature there is another prohibition [besides issues of reading them on Shabbos] even if they are written in Hebrew ...


3

You asked: What are the opinions of Poskim (contemporary or otherwise) regarding the propriety of publishing such pictures, and their reasons? The newspapers you mention have a Rabbinic Counsel of sorts, but it seems that the "no female pictures" comes from a Marketing Perspective. The average audience they target will not stop buying simply because ...


2

It's not considered a sacrilege to paint a picture of the chupa in one's future wedding. Nor to paint the wedding scene without the chupa. Source: I've been around a little and have never heard of such a thing; and Nit'e Gavriel and Taame Haminhagim don't mention it AFAICT.


2

Found a nice article on this issue, it says the same as above, in case of men only protruding (3D) images are forbidden, according to the majority of poskim, and even in that case a part of them allows scupltures which only form a face, or a face e.g. without an eye. The majority says drawings are allowed. Thus, halacha is more lenienet as the genral opinion ...


2

The relevant quote from Shulchan Aruch Harav is as follows (my own translation): בגדים המצויירים שתולים בכותלי בית הכנסת לנוי אע"פ שמן הדין אין בהם משום חציצה אין נכון להתפלל כנגדם כדי שלא יהא מביט בציורם ולא יכוין בתפלתו ואם יקרה לו להתפלל נגדם יעצים עיניו וגם כשמציירים כותלי בית הכנסת נכון שלא לצייר ציורים נגד פניו של אדם אלא למעלה מקומת איש. ...


1

I think one could argue that in Numbers 20:29, we have a new generation, and this generation is more aware and less likely to misread the information given. However, a simpler explanation might be gleaned from looking at the source text for Rashi's comment on Numbers 20:29, which is the Midrash Tanchuma Chukat, siman 17 (s.v. וידבר ה׳ אל משה קח את אהרן ...


1

Everyone who had seen Moses dead at Sinai was themselves dead. Just as the people believed that image, they believed this image.


1

Rabbi Ozer Alport from his weekly divrei Torah Parsha Potpourri quotes from the Pnennim Mshulchan Gevoha: Rav Elya Meir Bloch explains that this case was different, in that Moshe had already told the people that he witnessed Aharon’s death. They didn’t believe how the angel of death could have power over Aharon, so they were shown Aharon’s image to prove ...


1

I would like to suggest an answer. We know that the Satan has permission from Hashem to play tricks on people to tempt them to sin. This can go so far, like we find in the Parsha of a false prophet (Devarim 13:3) that he can even create real miracles and we are still not allowed to follow him based on what we see, when he tells us to commit Idolatry. ...



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