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13

Telephone exchanges in the US used to have two letters, sometimes referring to the neighborhood the exchange serves, and one number. So, Rav Moshe's phone number was 677-1222. ORegon/67 was an exchange in the Lower East Side. I don't know why they decided to name that exchange "Oregon." This database has multiple references to ORegon but no explanation.


12

We tried all the suggestions given above and they didn't work for the most part. The phone just kept on ringing. I tried this once and it worked so I use it with the persistent ones and it seems to get them off the phone quickly. Caller: I'm calling from__to thank you for your donation of $___..... Me: Thank you for calling! You've saved me a phone call. ...


11

I worked for one of the larger companies that called for various charity organizations. The only way to get them to stop calling would be following this script: Caller: Hi, Mr. Moses, I'm Binny Weiss calling for Yeshivas Mir Tash... You: Who's Mr. Moses?? I'm sorry, you have the wrong number. If you just say no, they will likely be calling you ...


8

Cell phone use is so widespread and the results of these studies are sketchy at best. Even if there is truth to the "reports", since the use of cell phones is so widespread it falls under the category of Shomer Pisayim Hashem, G-d guards fools. i.e. It is permissible to use cellphones.


8

No sources so please CYLOR but: The voicemail goes to a central server at your provider. When you dial in to retrieve your messages you are not accessing a message store on your phone rather you are dialing into a VM service. Since this server/service is maintained for both Jewish and Non-Jewish customers it would be permitted to have benefit from it even ...


7

I would assume it depends on what's considered a normal form of transaction. If any action is recognized by society as a form of transaction, halacha recognizes it -- this is known as kinyan situmta. But Rambam and Shulchan Aruch rule that if you use "word alone" to commit to buying or selling (without any language of oaths), "though you have made no mark ...


7

I wrote to Business Halacha Institute and they answered that it is prohibited to do so. As requested, here is the conversation: Aside from the secular law ramifications (illegal in the US): I would be interested in knowing how cell phone jammers fit into halacha, and what the reasons behind forbidding [or permitting] their use would be. Also ...


7

We need direct witnesses. Oh by the way, a simple "yes" is not enough of a response to a warning, it must be "yes I am aware of the punishment and prepared to do anyway." (Rambam Sanhedrin 12:3, אפילו אמר יודע אני, פטור: עד שיתיר עצמו למיתה, ויאמר על מנת כן אני עושה) As for the warning, the Gemara says "even if a demonic voice said don't do that or you'll ...


7

Most Poskim say that if another option exists, a telephone should not be used to fulfill the mitzvah of Havdalah. Rather a woman who is home alone and has no one to make Havdalah for her, should recite it herself (Mishnah Berurah 296:35 - Aruch HaShulchan 296:5) rather than listen to it over the telephone. Even if the lady can not drink wine, grape juice, or ...


6

It was his phone number. The first two letters of the word "ORegon" are numbers; after that come the numbers 7-1222.


5

It should be no different than any other halachah where you have to hear something. You can't be yotzei by hearing shofar, or megillah, or the like over the phone (will have to find the source for this), because you're not hearing the original sound but a re-creation of it from electrical signals; the same presumably applies to havdalah.


5

I would like to add that the mishna brura in 'סימן שח' סעיף קטן יב says that one should not use an item that is a kli shemelachto lissur if a kli that is muttar is available. So this question can only be relevant if one doesn't have a watch.


4

There's an app called JStream that let's you stream Jewish music from various stations. JStream Or for that matter, just search for Jewish on the market...


4

Orayta Jewish Books has what seems to be a phenomenal set of Jewish books in its app. I don't have it myself, but I'm very tempted to not only download it, but to donate to the developers as well.


4

There is a prohibition of "Ona'at Devarim" - "Verbal Oppresion". This prohibition emanates from two closely placed verses - Vayikra 25:14 and 25:17 that state "Do not aggrieve one another." This article details the applications of "Ona'as Devarim". In summary, the caller expected to make a sale. Your attempting to play jokes on him most likely aggrieved him ...


3

The Lubavitcher Rebbe wrote (with regards to Megilla, Shofar, and Gittin) that in contrast to an acoustic hearing aide whose amplified sound is connected to the original sound, a sound produced through a microphone (or telephone) has no halachic connection to the original sound. A microphone (or telephone) works by a voice changing the electric current ...


3

I vote for creating an app for this site!


3

See http://www.torah.org/advanced/weekly-halacha/5762/naso.html


3

We all get a large number of phone calls from Tzedaka organizations. We mostly don't answer the phone when a number or name we don't reconize shows up on the caller ID. That cuts out alot of requests, but I think for the most part the calls continue untill someone answers the phone and either gives or not. I find a bigger problem are the people who show up ...


3

We get a large number of phone calls from Tzedaka organizations as well. My policy is not to pledge over the phone, but to suggest they send mail and I will think about it, though I am careful not to agree to any pledge. I think the local police sent me a letter saying I pledged over the phone when I did not. I also would love it if there were a way to ...


3

There is a new free daf yomi app called "portal hadaf hyomi" The App includes many great features: The entire Talmud in clear fonts Talmud lessons to listen to and download, in Hebrew, English and Yiddish Articles, Leaflets,books and other helpful tools A location map for venues in which you can attend "Daf Hayomi" lectures A Calendar with enables the ...


3

If the charger has an indicator light it would obviously be forbidden as unplugging would extinguish it. Even if not, phone chargers utilize electricity even when the phone is not plugged in. Consequently unplugging would interrupt the flow of electricity and would most probably be forbidden on Shabbos under the general minhag/uvdin dechol prohibition of ...


2

OnYourWay (Uvelechtecha Baderech) contains a large number of Torah texts for free. It was originally made for the iPhone, but is now available on Android also (though its interface is a bit more difficult to use).


2

yes and also ieh shemeh rabah, and I think 13 midot and kedusha also, not because you heard it (because you didn't) but because you know someone finished a beracha. this would also apply in a place that people say amen loud before the hazan finishes the beracha, technically you didn't heard the ending but you can say amen because you know he did. note that ...


2

To my knowledge there was no opposition to utilizing telephones when they were initially introduced, the difficulty is that this in itself does not mean that there was no opposition. Furthermore, if there was no opposition, it could be difficult to demonstrate this fact since it is unlikely anyone would write teshuvos on why they do not object to an item ...


2

I'd reach out to the OU and Artscroll about creating an app for the OU's website and Artscroll's Hebrew-English Siddur. The OU website works fairly well on some mobile platforms (BB being the most notable exception), but an app would be great, especially for their holiday/Zmanim calendar. They also have tons of other content that would be great to access in ...


2

I've been using Crowded Road's iTalmud. It had some major issues with download management and audio playback, but a recent update reduced these to minor issues, at least for me.


2

So this is actually several different questions. In order from more to fewer poskim would say "yes": 1) Is it permissible to look at a cell phone that happens to be displaying the time on Shabbos? 2) Is it permissible to pick up your cell phone within your house and move it around for the purpose of having the time displayed elsewhere? 3) Is it ...



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