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9

The technical reason is a Gemara in Kiddushin that says that since women are not obligated in Tfilin (which is mentioned in a verse near the verse that speaks about Torah learning, where it says (Vshinantem levanecha, you shall teach your son(and not your daughter))), which they are free from because , they are not obligated in any commandment similar to ...


6

With regards to the first reason, I think you've fallen victim to explanations that have been cleaned up for political correctness. The Abudraham gives the following reason why women are exempt from time-bound positive commandments: ‫והטעם שנפטרו הנשים מהמצות עשה שהזמן‬ ‫גרמא לפי שהאשה משועבדת לבעלה לעשות צרכיו.‬ ‫ואם היחה מחוייבת במצות עשה שהזמן ...


6

Yes, he's liable. Here's one reason why. Everyone agrees that a third-party rodef ("pursuer") is not subject to kim lei bideraba minei (apply the greater punishment), as the rodef is not "liable to the death penalty." Rather, we do whatever is necessary to save the "pursued", with lethal force authorized only if needed. The bystander who shoots in the heart ...


5

Nit'ei Gavriel (Pesach, vol. 3, 50:11) cites authorities on both sides of the issue: The bar mitzvah boy and his father are indeed allowed to take haircuts (Mekor Chaim); They are not (Rivevos Ephraim); The boy can have his hair cut before his actual bar mitzvah date, when he's still a minor and not fully obligated (Divrei Shalom); If his hair is really ...


5

I've never heard of anyone purposely skipping Purim. I think that's a separate question. But as far as the behavior of someone purposely trying to get exempted from a Mitzva, the Gemara says that someone who goes out of his way to round his four-cornered garment so he'll be exempted from the mitzva of tzitzis, when Hashem is angry, watch out. Rabbi Moshe ...


4

Generally speaking, treat the sukkah as your dining room. If you had a massive leak in your dining room roof, you would eat elsewhere (potentially even going to a neighbor's house). There is a stricter standard for eating one piece of bread on the first night of sukkos, but otherwise: If it rains enough that the rain is ruining your soup If it's severely ...


4

Regardless, I assume you'll be saying the bits of Bible and Talmud (Yevarech'cha Hashem ... Eilu devarim sh'ayn lahem shiur ... eilu devarim she'adam ochel) that come right after the blessings? That's Torah. The Shema? That's Torah. Without trying, you'll wind up reciting some Torah sooner or later! But yes, it's part of the daily blessings no matter ...


4

From Torah.org Rambam series The concept of "Osek BMitzvah" has three general rules. (According to the Rambam) If you are engaged in a mitzvah (meaning your mind and actions are completely engrossed in it) Then you are exempt from doing any other mitzvot. This means that wearing tzizit does not patur you from other mitzvot because wearing them does not ...


3

There is a machlokes Rishonim about the status of a traveling Ben Ir and a Ben Kerach around Purim. According to one view (Aruch HaShulchan 688:14, the view of the Rosh), the correct procedure hinges on where one will be on the day of the 14th. If one expects to be home that evening before sunrise on the 14th, then he reads like wherever he lives (either on ...


3

Of the three books mentioned in the note in that article, Machazeh Eliyahu is available online. The page where he discusses this is here. Essentially, he says, it boils down to these two considerations: One reason for saying Tachanun in the first place is so that we should pray in three different bodily positions - sitting, standing, and with head down. ...


3

It depends on the case. But you should not go out of your way to exempt yourself from a mitzva. If we're told "it's a mitzva to do ABC", then we should think proactively about trying to do ABC, not wheedling out of it. The diabetic needs to eat on Yom Kippur? We certainly understand. A healthy person who felt like going for a ten mile run, but boy now he's ...


3

I recall hearing of an halachic opinion (not necessarily to be relied upon!) that anyone sleeping is exempt from mitzvos since he is incapacitated and thus anus. I can't cite that view at the moment, but according to it, yes, someone sleeping in a suka is exempt from shacharis.


3

The Talmud, in discussing Iyov (Bava Basra 16b), quotes Rava: אין אדם נתפס בשעת צערו A person is not liable (lit. trapped) [for what he says] during a moment of pain.


3

I do not know the source of this answer, but it is the answer that I have grown up with and makes sense to me. The answer actually combines the 2 answers you list in your question, and explains them a bit more. Women are not obligated for positive time bound mitzvot because of their monthly cycle. Since women have a monthly cycle, they are already given ...


2

The mitzvah of magid comes from the paseuk "v'higadta l'bincha b'yom hahu leymor", so you would think that the obligation was only to teach our children specifically, or only to teach someone who clearly did not know about or understand yetziat mitzrayim. This statement in the haggadah comes to tell us that when even the least-knowledgable person in the room ...


2

As mentioned in the other answer, women are not obligated in time bound positive mitsvot and also mila, pidion haben and peot. It is not a matter of higher or lower spiritual level, but different roles. A neshama is divided in two bodies: with one you fulfill the mitsva of mila, with the other the mitsva of nida: it is not a matter of better or worse. The ...


1

This allowance is for someone to say the shema when he is already "on the path". In such a circumstance, he will have more concentration if he says shema while continuing his journey than if we make him stop and delay his trip. For example, see Shulchan Aruch OC 183:11.


1

When Halacha deals with foods which are Ikar/Tafel (main/subordinate) - the Ikar/Tafel relationship is a logical one. In this case the bread has nothing to do with neither the fish nor the meat - so it wouldn't be in the geder of Ikar/Tafel. In your example above, eating the bread after the salty fish is in order not to harm him in his throat - this is ...


1

Rav Herschel Shachter said in one of his classes that the exemption here only applies within either bein adam l'chaveiro or bein adam la'makom. It does not cross this barrier. So while on a religious mission one may be exempt from the sukkah, but not from charity. (I'd love to link where he said this but don't recall).


1

Intention matters... but so do the circumstances and the reason for the patur. In the case of the Sukkah, we do not eat in the rain because it is unpleasant. If you find eating in the rain during sukkot unpleasant, then you should not eat in the sukkah even if you aren't eating even when it isn't raining. If, however, you normally don't eat in the Sukkah, ...


1

The exemption is a chok, a decree of the posuk. Neither the Chumash nor the Gemara give any other reason. Amongst the Rishonim, the Abudraham gives the reasons of family duties. It is not correct to say that women are on a higher plane than men. There is no Torah source that says this. Generally we have mitzvos because of our holiness (See Igros Moshe, ...



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