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7

The Lubavitcher Rebber writes that Television is forbidden because: It is so immodest, that even non-Jews started campaigning against it. It incites people to violence. (Watching movies with people killing each other causes one to think about murder). One will not be able to tell his children to watch only "kosher" material, as they will answer back "but ...


6

The letter from those Gedolei Yisrael regarding television was received differently by different people. It could be it was meant as a teshuvah but the reality that it was written in is not the reality today so many statements within it need to be taken in context. That they actually held that the television itself (the actual physical thing) was a toeivah ...


6

Rav Moshe held it was assur (forbidden) to go to movies and theaters. Rav Nebontzol (Rav of the old city of Yerushalayim and Talmid (student) of Rav Shlomo Zalman) writes in his Mishna Brura (B'Yitzchak Yikrah) in chelek 6 in the back (hanhagos v'minhagim number 3) that Television is assur.


6

The laws of Shabbat apply only to Jews, so someone who isn't Jewish is doing no wrong whatsoever when they watch TV on Friday night. For Jews, as pointed out in the comments, there is a difference between turning on a television and watching it. Turning on the TV directly activates a flow of electricity, which mainstream halachic opinion (certainly as I ...


6

The Jewish laws regarding "work" on the sabbath are complex and their application, especially into areas of modern technology require much study and the help of a local well educated teacher or mentor. However, one thing to remember -- in Judaism there is no concept of "do X and go to hell." Not only is the Jewish notion of post-death "punishment" ...


6

I think the question is the phrase "crying for chinam". My suspicion is it's not "you cried about something unimportant", rather it's "you cried when there was every reason not to." G-d had promised them they'd enter the land, and here they were crying "oh boo hoo we won't enter the land", there was no reason for them to be sad. Whereas if my favorite team ...


6

The Mishnah Brurah (549:1) explains that the main point of a fast is to do teshuvah, and not the fast itself: By Ninveh, concerning G-d undoing the decree to destroy them, it says "And G-d saw their actions," not "And G-d saw their fast." The fast is merely a preparation for the teshuvah. He continues, quoting the Chayei Adam, that those people who spend the ...


5

According to this answer on a question about performing such music, Igrot Moshe writes (Yoreh De'ah 2:56) that it is asur (forbidden) to listen to music that has avodah zara/Christian intent in it. Assessing intent is not always clear-cut and other sources may be more lenient in ambiguous cases, but both the lyrics and the images in the video you linked ...


5

Not having a television, and not being a big music guy anyways, I've only seen bits of the program at my fathers house while it was on, and that was many years ago. Nevertheless from memory and/or assumption I would suggest the following issues: T.V. in and of itself isn't so poshut (simple, i.e. it isn't a given that it is permitted in the first place, I ...


3

According to the tana kama in the baraisa on Avodah Zarah 18b, you can't go to stadiums, because of idolatry and because of frivolity. Rabbi Nasan permits it because he might be able to save a Jew if he's offered to the gladiators, or at least he can testify that he died so that his wife could remarry. There's nothing marked in the Ein Mishpat there, so it ...


3

Rosh Hashana is a two-day holiday. If Wednesday night begins the first day, as noted by Ari Brodsky in a comment on the question, then playing on Thursday, either before or after sundown, doesn't help -- it's still Rosh Hashana, moving into the second day. If Wednesday night began the second day of Rosh Hashana (which isn't actually possible according to ...


2

It is a clear prohibition of Moshav Leitzim (a gathering of scoffers/ session of scorners), Mishneh Berurah 307:59 (Translation from the Feldheim Edition) “Because of the prohibition against participation in a gathering of scoffers.” One certainly transgress this prohibition if he goes to theaters and circuses [which are places of amusement ...


1

Based on Rema YD 286:2, a mezuzah is required on a room in a house even if it is used for bathing. Since we always cover our mezuzahs, all opinions agree that a mezuzah is required (see Shach s.k. 9) A television has no relation to a bathroom, which does not have a mezuzah because of dirat kavod, and a living room is a proper dwelling place, even if you ...


1

I thought Rav Ovadiah's opinion was that non-live Kol Isha was only a problem if you knew the singer personally; I hadn't heard about the visual component. (No pun intended.) But I could me mistaken. Let's ask the following question: if your practice is to watch American Idol when it's not Sefira, should anything change because of Sefira? The answer as ...


1

I don't see why a stand up comedy club is any more an inappropriate venue qua stand up comedy club than Purim shticks or other aspects of Comedy and Jewish Life. However there may be other concerns on a case by case basis such as wasted time, inappropriate dress and/or content, and non-Jew's alcohol. As usual, make your decisions wisely.


1

When I was in his shiur from 2009-2011, HaRav Mordechai Machlis shlit"a said over a maaseh shehaya about when he was applying to enroll one of his daughters (not sure which one) in a certain haredi seminary. On the application, there was a question about ownership of television in the home of the student. Any girl who lived in a home containing a ...



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