New answers tagged

1

The obligation for women to drink 4 cups like men from the Gemoro in Pesochim 108b. ת"ר: הכל חייבין בארבעה כוסות הללו, אחד אנשים ואחד נשים Reasons given are that although women are exempt from time-bound mitzvos, here women were also involved in the miracles. Further it was in their merit that we were redeemed and they also suffered the enslavement ...


1

The Piskei Teshuvos Siman 473:2 writes that even those who are noheg to say sahlom aliechem and eishes cheil on Yom tov should not say it the night of pesach in order to hurry and make kiddush right away,since it is a mitzva to do so.(Vayged Moshe 13:2) However,he brings in footnote 9 that there are those who still say these items such as Chassidei ...


0

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein wrote (Iggrot Moshe, Orech Chaim 3:63) that the custom not to eat kitniyot on Passover was not created by a group of rabbis issuing a formal ban; rather different communities developed the custom of refraining from certain foods on Passover because they could be mistaken for chametz or they were grown or processed in proximity to ...


2

According to Rabbi Yehuda Shurpin (chabad.org): The Shulchan Aruch HaRav (Orech Chaim 453:3-4) applies the prohibition of kitniyot to any legume-like foods which look similar to dishes made from grain when cooked. Also, certain foods, such as mustard seeds, are prohibited because they grow in pods similar to legumes; and cumin is prohibited because its seeds ...


2

There are several ways that products can be gluten free but not kosher for Passover. Gluten free oats which have not been baked into matzahs in the appropriate manner for Passover (as mentioned in another answer). It is worth pointing out for those who are coeliac or highly sensitive to gluten that most oats are contaminated by glutenous grains such as ...


8

Yes it is permissible, but you have to be extra careful how you handle stray pieces of dough or leftovers in the kneading trough which might become Chametz (see ShA OC 459:4 and 460:3 for details).


0

No because gluten free doesn't necesarily mean no chametz. One very common way of making something gluten free is by adding enzymes which specifically break down gluten. Many of these products still contain grains which have become chametz though.


4

The source is Shulchan Oruch Orach Chayim 487 (4) בליל ראשון של פסח גומרים את ההלל בצבור בנעימה בברכה תחלה וסוף ובן בליל שני של שני ימים טובים של גליות On the first night of Pesach, we complete the Hallel with the community with a pleasant tune and a blessing at the beginning and end. The same is on the second night outside Israel. The Rema ...


7

No because they could still contain products made from gluten free grains, such as oats, which are still one of the 5 grains we must guard against becoming chametz (Shulchan Arukh 453:1). Although it is worth mentioning (as DoubleAA points out in the comments) that oats may not actually be one of the 5 grains. However i am not aware of any poseks that will ...


0

There was an answer that if you find Chametz in your house, it can be put into the closet that had been rented (not sold) to the non-Jew for his chametz because the chametz belongs to him and should be put there. This was part of a discussion about destroying Chametz that had been found during Pesach (especially on Shabbat or Yom Tov). what should be done ...


3

The years are 353, 354, 355, (nonleap) and 383, 384, 385 years (leap). divide by seven and the remainder shows how many days in the week each day in the year will have been moved from the previous year. Here is the modulo 7 list for the possible years. 353 % 7 = 3 354 % 7 = 4 355 % 7 = 5 383 % 7 = 5 384 % 7 = 6 385 % 7 = 0 This year we have 385 days which ...


1

@hazoriz's answer provides specific years. Here, I will explain the general scenario. There are 6 lengths of Judaic years: Chaser or "missing" - 353 days for regular and 383 days for leap years Kesidrah - "In order" - 354 days for regular and 384 for leap years Maleh - "Full" - 355 days for a regular and 385 for leap years I won't delve into how the ...


3

5751,5752 The previous time The next time 5778,5779 (if we do not start deciding months by the court) This time 5775,5776


3

When I asked the question of my Rav, he answered that part of the agreement with the non-Jew was that I could have access to the areas rented out to the non-Jew on Pesach. The access should be for as short a time as possible. Aish.com poses the question: During Pesach, may items be taken from sections of the house that have been sold? and ...


1

Here are some photos of on that I found on the first day


1

There is quite some discussion on whether toothpaste needs to be kosher for Pesach, but none I found focusing on chametz that would have gotten onto the tube or bottle. Poskim who permit regular toothpaste on Pesach do not mention this situation. R Chaim Jachter cites R Yosef Dov Soloveitchik and R Moshe Feinstein stating that that toothpaste is not ra’ui ...


1

Chabad specifically makes it chunky and dry in order not to cause problems with gebrokts


5

Yes, Chametz is less of a problem on 14 Nisan. See Rambam Chametz UMatza 1:6-7 that on 14 Nisan consumption of Chametz "only" carries the punishment of lashes whereas on Pesach itself it carries the punishment of Karet. As an example of a stringency about Chametz which doesn't apply on 14 Nisan: see Shulchan Arukh OC 447:2 that Chametz is nullified in a ...


-1

There are are varying pasuk I'm that we learn the prohibition of when we are no longer able to eat chametz on the 14th and is discussed at length in gemara pesachim and shulchan aruch. One of them that comes to mind is where it talks about not to slaughter the kardbon pesach over chametzz and from there we learn that one may not longer eat chametz from the ...


3

Shulchan Aruch in siman 481 writes: A person is required to involve themselves in the laws of Pesach and Yetzias Mitzraim and discuss the signs and wonders that Hashem did for our forefathers until he is 'caught' by sleep. Be'er Hagola points out this is all from the Tur in the name of the Tosefta, based on the story With Rabi Eleazar and Rabi Yehoshua ...


7

The CRC is the source of a detailed article (written January 2008) that explains the reasoning behind the discussion of the generation of carbon dioxide. The significant part is at the end where they say (which I put in bold) that they have decided to be strict on the matter because it involves chametz on Pesach. They only certify CO2 that is definitely not ...


6

OUKOSHER.ORG says that carbon dioxide used to be produced from grain fermentation. I imagine that the Star-K has determined it is not a concern and the CRC-Chicago has been unable to verify this to their satisfaction. See here the discussion by the CRC-Chigago which concurs with my answer. Seltzer exists in two forms. UNFLAVORED SELTZER is simply water ...


0

My Rav replied to me that it is sufficient to clean the toaster as much as possible, shaking crumbs out, and then "Bittul Chametz will then nullify whatever tiny crumbs or absorbed chametz remains."


3

Star K states that toasters and toaster ovens can not be made kosher for Passover. From what I have heard from a mashgiach, the main problem is that the toaster contains small crevices where crumbs may still be present, and it is impossible to extract the chametz from there. Usually, metal ovens and toasters would be koshered using libun a hot torch. ...


5

No because it unfit for canine consumption pesachim 15b Shall we say that this supports him: If a loaf goes mouldy and is unfit for human consumption, yet a dog can eat it, it can be defiled with the uncleanness of eatables, if the size of an egg45b With whom agrees the following which we learned: A general principle was stated in respect to the laws of ...


1

According to Rav Yitzchak Abadi, coca cola is inherently kosher for Sephardim and Ashkenazim during Passover without a hecsher according to halakha. His responses are as follows: Questioner: Is it permitted to drink plain coca cola on Pesach? Rabbi Abadi: Yes Source: http://kashrut.org/forum/viewpost.asp?mid=56956&highlight=coca%20cola ...


1

Not necessarily are they all one thing. Perhaps they are two or three separate announcements made before he Seder so it became consolidated and printed as one paragraph. We find examples of the opposite as well, when the Rosh Hashanah Machzor separates parts of Shmoneh Esrei because of how they are printed the rest of the year to make room for Yaaleh Veyavo ...


2

Before nightfall at the start of 15 Nisan, Chametz is just like any other prohibited food in terms of nullification in mixtures (ShA OC 447:2, cf. YD 102:4) so regular rules like 1:60 and Ta'am Lifgam would apply. From that point until the end of Pesach it is never nullified in a mixture and forbids one from deriving any benefit from the mixture (OC 447:1). ...


0

The bitul of chametz in a mixture is the 60:1 because both of them were mutar before Pesach. The bitul of the declaration would not allow it to be eaten as that is similar to finding a piece of bread on Pesach that had been "nullified" by the kol chamirah. You would still have to destroy it on chol hamoed as it is still forbidden chametz. The difference ...


0

Two unrelated uses of the word bitul, which is causing some confusion here: If the quantity of chametz in this food is negligible, it's not considered "chametz." I declare any chametz I own to be "good as dust." Any question of mixtures addresses the first point, completely unrelated to the second. Here's a nice piece from the Star-K on the subject. In ...


1

The Netziv points out that while there was a Temple, the Seder revolved around the Passover sacrifice. Then they arrived in Babylonia (speaking Aramaic), and looked around and said, wait a minute, what Biblical obligations do we still have tonight? Well, telling the story, but what object? The only remaining tangible, Biblically-obligated item is the matza. ...


1

A logical answer: This bread reminds me that I come from a poor background. So I am sensitive to what the poor man is experiencing, so I will invite him to mine. (It is also Imitatio dei והלכת בדרכיו because G_d help me in my bad times). As I remember that G_d help me, I internalize the Idea that he is able to help again. And I hope that with the help of ...


2

[this was written before the OP edited his question and made it sefardi-specific, I will leave it up for Ashkenazim interested in the question] For Ashkenazim, the problem with regular Coca Cola is not just the question of the citric acid but rather the high-fructose corn syrup. See here for instance In its year-round formula, Coca-Cola uses ...


2

There are several points that can be made about this. First, this emphasizes that we are still in galus. If we were free and bringing the karban Pesach, we could not have said this. Additionally, we are making our guests feel better because they see us using "poor man's bread" and it might appear that we cannot afford better. On the other hand, a poor man at ...


3

There are several points that can be made about this. First, this emphasizes that we are still in galus. If we were free and bringing the karban Pesach, we could not have said this. Additionally, we are making our guests feel better because they see us using "poor man's bread" and it might appear that we cannot afford better. On the other hand, a poor man at ...


6

Kefula means "doubled over." We have the same root word used in the morning bracha "zokef kefufim" (He straightens those who are bent over), or in upcoming Daf Yomi, "tenai kaful" (a legal stipulation where both possibilities are spelled out, if x then y, but if not x then z). Then there's nefucha (swelled matzah), typically a bubble, similar in appearance ...


1

This video says we do need to check The main thing is not to eat it From my experience the hashgocho usually takes responsibility to check, (but sometimes they miss some so if you find do not eat) See this answer it answers your question beautifully http://judaism.stackexchange.com/a/70543/5120


2

Kefula as is mentioned by the other answer, is a doubled over fold. You won't see these folds in store bought matzah as some of the comments have mentioned, because the ones that are baking look out for these folds and tend remove such matzot before sending the boxes out. Basically what happens is when one is placing the dough in the oven to be cooked, part ...


2

Per Rabbi Yehuda Spitz on Ohr.edu based on a letter written by Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Aurbach to the Chazon Ish regarding teeth & dentures any food that remains in the mouth becomes repulsive and Pagum. He goes on to say that it is best not to eat any Chometz 24 hours prior and to drink a hot cup of water prior to Pesach, and that a proper oral cleaning is ...


7

It's from the Talmud (Pesachim 53b) with the reason given as "for it looks like he is consecrating his animal and consuming an offering outside [of the Temple]". The Shulchan Arukh codifies it as well (OC 469). (The Arukh haShulchan (ibid. :4) notes that the Rambam did not codify this rule, and thinks that he omitted it because he thought it only was true ...


0

Rav Modechai Kamenetzsky, Rabbi Avigdor Miller and others just read through the hagaddah with no embellishments or additions. That should be quick enough. I checked the reference CHECKLIST FOR YOUR PASSOVER The source has proven reliable in the past. You appear to be correct as to the reference to the hagaddah that you would want to use. Here is the ...


2

It would have the status of chametz she'avar alav hapesach and it would be forbidden to derive any benefit from it. Whether the sale was conditioned on his being an actual gentile or not, the chametz was definitely owned by a Jew and any further sale would accomplish nothing in terms of it's already forbidden status.


1

While the answerers who preceded me are correct that this seems no different from the regular candelabrum for any other holiday or Shabas, I'll note that Shulchan Aruch (472:2) says: He should set his table (for the seder on Pesach) with nice receptacles to the extent of his ability. Magen Avraham (paraphrased also in Mishna B'rura) explains: All ...


2

We treat oats as chametz. Done. Millet seems to be the main ingredient in the list above; Rabbi Dr. Slifkin seems to recommend straight millet, or sunflower seeds for some species. (Ashkenazi custom is not to eat millet, but you can certainly own it and feed it to your birds. It's kitniyos, not chametz.) Brewers' yeast is a natural source of B-vitamins. ...


0

Brewer's yeast together with the oat grains would in combo would very likely cause it to be chametz. In the worst case, the yeast alone would be considered "se'or" - a rising "agent". It's possible that the "natural / articial colors" may have chametz ingredients. You'd have to know what went into them, which you may be able to discover by calling the ...


1

I think that the answer is "simpler" than what sabbahillel mentioned. In the picture, I see a total of 8 "cups". I know that this may sound strange, but, I have seen some people use an 8 cup menorah rather than the 9 cup one that you commonly see. The 9th cup is for the shamash, and some people don't specifically place this on the menorah at all. Some ...


2

It is not a Passover custom. You are speaking of the normal Shabbat and Yom Tov candelabra. There is a custom cited by Mishnah Berurah 263:6 to light seven or ten candles. This could be a reason why silversmiths make seven branched candelabras beside the custom referred to below. A woman lights candles for her family before Shabbat and Yom Tov. The custom ...


0

The laws of mixing fruit juices with flour derive from two seemingly irreconcilable Talmudic teachings: אמר רבה בר בר חנה אמר ריש לקיש: עיסה שנילושה ביין ושמן ודבש - אין חייבין על חימוצה כרת Rabba bar bar Hanna said in the name of Reish Lakish: Dough kneaded with wine, oil or honey that rises is not forbidden as chametz (Pesachim 35a) vs. ...


1

Answer to Q1 from here: A. Some contend that, despite inferences to the contrary, Hallel on Seder night is not a mitzvah but only expresses our rejoicing (Shu’t Ri MiGash #44). B. Alternatively, although there is a mitzvah Seder night to praise Hashem, this praise could be spontaneous and unstructured which would not technically require ...


0

If the 2nd day of Pesach has a "doubt" as to whether it is the first or second day then we would probably read both that of the first day and that of the second which means we would have to remove 3 Sifrei Torah instead of 2, and would have to do the same every day except the 8th day. On Sukkot it is less of a problem as the 2nd day reading is Maftir only ...



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