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As DoubleAA indicated the Mishna in Moed Katan 2:4 writes One may not move belongings from one house to another, but he may move [his belongings] if both houses are in the same courtyard. One may not bring back vessels from the house of the craftsman, but if one is weary about leaving them [lest they get lost] he may move them to another ...


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This is my own reasoning; I don't have rabbinic sources. It appears that at the time Israel was in Egypt, the typical dwelling was the four-room house, which had the following layout for the ground floor: While multiple rooms means interior passages, there appears to be only one exterior doorway. The following photo from an archaeological site of the ...


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Sidestepping the issue as to whether or not diet soda uses artificial sweeteners or corn syrup, lets go with the assumption that it's corn syrup. Yes you can drink it, because corn (and its derivatives) isn't actual chametz, so there is no obligation to sell it during Passover. Therefore a can of soda is permissible even if it wasn't sold during Passover. ...


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It's written, I believe, but don't know where, that women are exempt from coming 3 times a year to the Beis Hamikdash, because only males are commanded, but they still have to go to Yerushalayim because of the Mitzva of Simchas Yom Tov. Which implies that there is a Mitzva of Simcha of all Sholosh Regolim. Since I don't know the source I can't check the ...


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Otzar Minhagei Chabad says that the Sefer "Minhag Israel Torah" says that there was an old Chassidic custom to stay up on the seventh night of Pesach and say over miracle stories. However, some aren't happy with this custom (it doesn't say the reason in Otzar Minhagei Chabad and I don't have a copy of Minhag Yisrael Torah). Presumably, the reason to stay up ...


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The obligation for women to drink 4 cups like men from the Gemoro in Pesochim 108b. ת"ר: הכל חייבין בארבעה כוסות הללו, אחד אנשים ואחד נשים Reasons given are that although women are exempt from time-bound mitzvos, here women were also involved in the miracles. Further it was in their merit that we were redeemed and they also suffered the enslavement ...


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The Piskei Teshuvos Siman 473:2 writes that even those who are noheg to say sahlom aliechem and eishes cheil on Yom tov should not say it the night of pesach in order to hurry and make kiddush right away,since it is a mitzva to do so.(Vayged Moshe 13:2) However,he brings in footnote 9 that there are those who still say these items such as Chassidei ...


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Rabbi Moshe Feinstein wrote (Iggrot Moshe, Orech Chaim 3:63) that the custom not to eat kitniyot on Passover was not created by a group of rabbis issuing a formal ban; rather different communities developed the custom of refraining from certain foods on Passover because they could be mistaken for chametz or they were grown or processed in proximity to ...


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According to Rabbi Yehuda Shurpin (chabad.org): The Shulchan Aruch HaRav (Orech Chaim 453:3-4) applies the prohibition of kitniyot to any legume-like foods which look similar to dishes made from grain when cooked. Also, certain foods, such as mustard seeds, are prohibited because they grow in pods similar to legumes; and cumin is prohibited because its seeds ...


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There are several ways that products can be gluten free but not kosher for Passover. Gluten free oats which have not been baked into matzahs in the appropriate manner for Passover (as mentioned in another answer). It is worth pointing out for those who are coeliac or highly sensitive to gluten that most oats are contaminated by glutenous grains such as ...


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Yes it is permissible, but you have to be extra careful how you handle stray pieces of dough or leftovers in the kneading trough which might become Chametz (see ShA OC 459:4 and 460:3 for details).


0

No because gluten free doesn't necesarily mean no chametz. One very common way of making something gluten free is by adding enzymes which specifically break down gluten. Many of these products still contain grains which have become chametz though.


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The source is Shulchan Oruch Orach Chayim 487 (4) בליל ראשון של פסח גומרים את ההלל בצבור בנעימה בברכה תחלה וסוף ובן בליל שני של שני ימים טובים של גליות On the first night of Pesach, we complete the Hallel with the community with a pleasant tune and a blessing at the beginning and end. The same is on the second night outside Israel. The Rema ...


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No because they could still contain products made from gluten free grains, such as oats, which are still one of the 5 grains we must guard against becoming chametz (Shulchan Arukh 453:1). Although it is worth mentioning (as DoubleAA points out in the comments) that oats may not actually be one of the 5 grains. However i am not aware of any poseks that will ...


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There was an answer that if you find Chametz in your house, it can be put into the closet that had been rented (not sold) to the non-Jew for his chametz because the chametz belongs to him and should be put there. This was part of a discussion about destroying Chametz that had been found during Pesach (especially on Shabbat or Yom Tov). what should be done ...


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The years are 353, 354, 355, (nonleap) and 383, 384, 385 years (leap). divide by seven and the remainder shows how many days in the week each day in the year will have been moved from the previous year. Here is the modulo 7 list for the possible years. 353 % 7 = 3 354 % 7 = 4 355 % 7 = 5 383 % 7 = 5 384 % 7 = 6 385 % 7 = 0 This year we have 385 days which ...


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@hazoriz's answer provides specific years. Here, I will explain the general scenario. There are 6 lengths of Judaic years: Chaser or "missing" - 353 days for regular and 383 days for leap years Kesidrah - "In order" - 354 days for regular and 384 for leap years Maleh - "Full" - 355 days for a regular and 385 for leap years I won't delve into how the ...


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5751,5752 The previous time The next time 5778,5779 (if we do not start deciding months by the court) This time 5775,5776



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