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19

Taz (Orach Chaim 476:2) mentions such a custom. The people who did so were concerned that any kind of meat might be confused with roast (and as YS noted, the Ashkenazic custom is indeed not to eat roast meat at the Seder). However, he understands Tur to be saying that it is improper to do so, because the joy of Yom Tov includes eating meat; the best ...


16

R' Eizik Vitebsker writes (look in Os 26) that the origin of this Chumra was from the Mezritcher Maggid. R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi explains that since some opinions say that flour which was baked (without being kneaded first) can still become chometz after contacting water as it may not have been baked well. He writes that (at least in his time) one could ...


15

See Tosfos "me'alyah", Pesachim 3b, where it says most were sheep. Background: A non-Jew came and told R' Yehuda ben Beseirah that he routinely goes to Jerusalem to eat from the Korban Pesach (which is forbidden to non-Jews). R' Yehuda wasn't going to Jerusalem himself, and so couldn't notify the Jews there. So he came up with a plan for the non-Jew to get ...


15

With the early machines in the late 1800s, they'd have a giant roller cranking out a huge flat sheet of dough, then use big cookie-cutters on it. If you used round cookie-cutters, you'd either have to throw away all the dough in between the circle shapes, or would feel pressured to rework it within the 18 minutes, which is going to be hard to do. Therefore ...


15

Very good question. The Piskei Tshuvos 5:492 brings down that scrupulous individuals are accustomed to eat matzah on peasach sheni. In footnote 9, he brings down that in the siddur Yaavetz (Rav Yaakov Emden) that it was revealed to him from the heavens that the kedusha of pesach and matzah lasts until pesach sheni because when they went out from Egypt they ...


13

Mishna B'rura 476:11 and Taame Haminhagim 513 say that one should eat it.


13

From the Wikipedia article on Chametz (leaven): The Torah has several commandments governing chametz during Passover: The positive commandment to remove all chametz from one's home (Exodus 12:15). Not to possess chametz in one's domain. (Exodus 12:19, Deuteronomy 16:4). Not to eat chametz, or mixtures containing chametz (Exodus 13:3, Exodus ...


13

The Nitei Gavriel Pesach 2 Chapter 43:9 brings in the name of the Shevet Halevi that since a convert is as if he is newly born there is a question whether he is still considered a Bechor. Therefore the Nitei Gavriel concludes that it is best that he should either make a Siyum or be part of a Seudas Mitzva.


12

This custom is known as gebrochts (Yiddish for "broken"); or "matza shruya" (soaked matza) in modern Hebrew. It's prevalent in many Hassidic and Hassidically-influenced communities, though many first encounter it with Lubavitch. The custom arose out of concern that there may be a packet of dry flour in your matza. If that flour never reacted with water, ...


11

If you're having guests or relatives who might not be familiar with the Hebrew, get something with English translation, and preferably enough copies so you can call out page numbers for everyone. Rabbi Hershel Shachter feels that everyone at the table should have the same Hebrew text. (Although many different Hagadas use the same Hebrew text, just with ...


11

If such matzos are rare or nonexistent, it's because they don't fit as well in a box and thus require either a round box, which costs more to make and assemble, or both more box space per matza, taking up valuable room in shipping etc., and empty space in each box, increasing the likelihood of breaking matzos. Source (so to speak): conjecture.


11

R Eliezer Dunner of Bene Brak told me, a ger firstborn, to fast. (The siyumim had already concluded.)


10

If there are three people who recite the Hallel together, the two responsive readings (the four verses ending "Ki LeOlam Chasdo" at the beginning of Psalm 118 and the four "Ana Hashem" verses toward the end of that psalm) are recited as in the Shul: the leader recites each of the "Ki LeOlam Chasdo" verses and the others answer "Hodu" [and the next verse ...


10

Per the Star-K and CRC-Chicago it is not Kitniyos Kosher for Passover Status: Quinoa was determined to be Kosher L'Pesach. It is not related to the chameishes minei dagan-five types of grain products, nor to millet or rice. Quinoa is a member of the "goose foot" family, which includes sugar beets and beet root. The Star-K tested quinoa to ...


10

A majority of Jews cannot bring a Pesach on Pesach Sheni. Only a minority can, and only if the majority brought theirs on Pesach Rishon. Pesachim (79a-80b).


10

You can own them (Rama in Shulchan Aruch OC 453:1). The Mishna Berura there adds that you can even derive benefit from them.


10

An original source of this custom is the Sheyare Knesses HaGedola Siman 471:3 where he writes that the custom in Kushta (Istanbul) is to avoid eating matza as of Rosh Chodesh Nissan.


10

Matzah made with other liquids besides (instead of) water are called "matzah ashira" enriched matzahs. While some object to them because they undercut the "lechem oni" bread of affliction that water/flour matzot represent, there are other concerns regarding whether they create an environment for fermentation. Here is one treatment of the argument with the ...


9

The requirement to kasher burners is mention in RM"A (451 law 4). Mishna Brura (note 34) states that it isn't really necessary, since food absorbed by one utensil cannot pass to a second utensil just by touching one another (there needs to be hot liquid involved). Furthermore, even if some food spilled on to the burner, it likely burned up completely. ...


9

The profit was from the natural water that we sold them. The miracle was that their own water became blood. The miracle drove up the price of water from zero to something. The profit was an indirect result of the miracle.


9

Hacham Ovadia Yosef discusses this issue in Yabia Omer Helek 7 Siman 44 in terms of the kinneret, which supplies water for most of israel. Kibbutzim along the coast are KNOWN for dumping hametz into the water. He answers that hametz dumped before pesach is nullified in 60. During pesach, he applies the concept of "tzonen bitzonen". Since the hametz and water ...


9

The roots of this minhag actually lie in the Gemara itself. In Pesachim 40b, there is a discussion which says explicitly that Rav Papi allowed servants in the beit Reish Galuta to thicken a tavshil with "chasisi." The Rif says this is matzah meal; Tosafot say it is lentil flour, and Rashi says it is dried flour. Rava says we need to be concerned in a place ...


9

The Jews of Bagdad and Morocco stayed away from rice because they were afraid that it was mixed with wheat. See Ben Ish Chai Tzav 41 , Rav Pe’alim 3:30


9

Rasash Pesachim 53a writes that if a community's custom is not to eat roasted meat on the evening of 15 Iyar for the same reason it is not eaten on the night of Pesach, then they should not eat it. He writes that even in a community which doesn't have this custom, eating a full roasted lamb in the manner of the Korban Pesach would remain prohibited as that ...


9

In Israel, only the first night is a full holiday, and as such, the Seder is only ever on the first night. In the Diaspora, both the first and second nights are full holidays. The Seder should be done on both nights. If, for some reason, someone is really only able to do one of them, it should be the first. This is because the first night is a Biblical ...


8

Rav Yosef Tzvi Rimon indicates (article) that the forgotten pieces would be nullified by bitul chametz. the pieces should be smaller than a ke-zayit, so that if one of them is not found, the bittul declaration will suffice to avoid the violation.


8

You'd have to do something to force the water to cover the side flanges (or rims) of the sink too (such as by dropping in a hot stone), but otherwise I'd think it would be halachically fine - it should be similar to the case of a very large pot, where you can boil the water for hagalah in it (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 452:6).


8

The Gemara in Pesachim 46a (brought in the Rambam Laws of Chametz 5:13 and the Shulchan Aruch OC 459:2) says that if one leaves dough for the length of time that it takes to walk 1 "mil" (a Talmudic unit of distance) then it becomes Chametz. Opinions regarding the time it takes to walk a mil vary from 18-24 minutes, and here we are strict to take the shorter ...


8

Machzor Vitry (sec. 65) attributes them to Rashi. This site says that it has also been attributed to R. Shmuel of Falaise, one of the Tosafists (mid-13th century), but that the true authorship is unknown. (It was actually originally just one of a lot of mnemonics for the order of the Haggadah composed by various rishonim. Another one, from Maharam ...



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