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Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok Katz in a sefer called Haggadah KeHalachah (p. 282) explains that all the questions are answered in the first paragraph, as subsequently expounded in the Haggadah. ויוציאנו ה' משם - G-d took us out from there, which was in a way that there was no time for the dough to rise, so we only eat Matzah. עבדים היינו - We were slaves, and the ...


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The sefer "HaSeder HaAruch" (vol. 2 chapter 129) brings several answers to this question: Moshe did not accomplish the desired goal of the Exodus from Egypt. The actual redemption was only brought about through the plague of Death of the Firstborn, which was executed by Hashem Himself, and not through Moshe, as we say in the Haggadah "I, and not the ...


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When I learned Yehoshua the explanations were based on the continuation that Avraham had Yitzchak and Yishmael, and Yitzchak had Yaakov and Eisav. That is this was a process of continuous refining until Yaakov had the twelve sons that were all worthy of becoming Am Hashem. Terach was the start of the process as shown by the fact that the Torah uses "Toldos ...


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Malbim explains (and M'tzudas David alludes) that Terach and Nachor served idols, so that Avraham was surrounded on all sides, so to speak, by idolators: both his father and his brother. The sequel, describing his leaving that environment, is all the greater then. I suppose that either Haran didn't worship idols or, with one of Avraham's brothers mentioned, ...


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"Kol Hamarbeh Lisapir Byitziyas MitzRayim Haray Zeh Mishoebach" means that when extending the time past the end of the zman, one is to be praised even though one is no longer fulfilling the mitzvah. Note that the story has Rabbi Elazar ben Azaryah continuing to speak of Yetzias Mitzraim past chatzos even though he held that the seder had to end at chatzos. ...


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It's not an invitation to your Seder. It's a reminder\quote from the times of the Beit haMikdash (Temple), inviting people to share with you the Korban Pesach (Paschal Sacrifice), and the accompanying Matzo and Marror. That's why Ha Lachma Anya concludes with a prayer that we should return to Israel, and be able to once again bring the Korban Pesach. ...


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Chad Gadya - Why do we sing it as the Seder? One Jewish author from the 1800's, Yitzchak Baer Levinsohn, and subsequently the Encyclopedia Judaica, write the purpose of the song is "for the amusement of the children so that they might not fall asleep before the end of the seder." Many rabbis take issue with this trivialization, on the basis that if it ...


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All does not mean ALL. There are other exceptions apart from women like a student by his teacher. It means all who are supposed to lean. They lean and dont sit.


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I guess one simple reason is that the text uses the demonstrative pronoun 'ha', 'this', to refer to the matzo, which assumes it's there and obvious to everybody. Before kiddush, though, bread or matzo are covered.


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I heard a dvar torah last week on this. The Satan wants to mess up our seder, but he only understands Hebrew. When we start in a foreign language (Aramaic), he gets frustrated and leaves.


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Rabbi Yehonasan Eybeschutz explains that "Kol Dichfin yesay veyechal..." is not to be interpreted as an invitation, but rather as a statement of fact about the Seder. It should not be translated (as you did) "let all who are hungry...," but rather, "all who are hungry...". It is simply adding another detail about the Seder, namely, that we invite poor ...


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The Maharal in Gevuros Hashem ch. 52 explains this line in two ways. In his first explanation, he writes that the point is not that Hashem would have / could have only taken us out then, but rather that no one else could have taken us out, whether then or at some later point. This is because the Exodus was the creation of the Jewish nation from potential ...


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The Maharal in Gevuros Hashem Ch. 52 suggests two answers to this question: First answer: דודאי התשובה הוא בסוף המאמר שמשיב על פסח מצה ומרור כאשר מגיע לשם... וכן על שאנו מסובין משיב בכל דור ודור חייב אדם לראות את עצמו כאלו הוא יצא ממצרים וכו' ומפני שיראה עצמו כאילו יצא ממצרים יש לעשות הסבה The answer is at the end in the description of the Pesach ...


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An interesting point that I have heard actually considers what happened in the United States after the civil war. American Blacks became "free", but examine what happened in the next hundred years. After the slaves became free we had the rise of Jim Crow laws, segregation, the attempt to live in the world of racial prejudice, the start of the modern Civil ...


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1) Perhaps it means the culturally we would still be enslaved to Pharaoh. We would be entrenched in the Egyptian values, their ethical and philosophical beliefs. We would be assimilated into the Egyptian society never to break away if not for God taking us out and providing us with a new outlook on life. 2) Perhaps it is not telling us a historical ...


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Every year I pick one Hagadda to go through and underline certain highlights that I plan to mention at the seder, and I use that Hagadda at the Seder. Usually I pick this Hagadda based on a long list of recommendations, or else based on a experience with other writings of a given Hagadda author. I have a bunch of copies of the Artscroll Children's ...


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There's a concept called "תדיר ושאינו תדיר, תדיר קודם", which loosely translated means "between something frequent and something infrequent, we do the frequent first" (see Mishna Zevachim 10:1). In this case, since motsi is frequent and al achilat matzah is infrequent, we say motsi first. The Sixth Lubavitcher Rebbe's לקוטי טעמים ומנהגים להגדה של פסח ...


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During the shabbos hagadol drasha this year (5774) our rav mentioned the statement that each of the arba kosos is regarded as a separate mitzva. He stated that many mitzvos must be performed 'al hakos'. Thus the cups themselves are not mi'd'oraisa, but the mitzva they are drunk for are torah prescribed. Other mitzvos that are required al hakos are bris ...


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Matzah represents alacrity combined with diligence . Both are required in Servitude or Freedom Acquiring these as enduring characters are one of the tools we can instill in ourselves & our families on Seder nights


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There is absolutely nothing wrong with a non-Jewish person attending a seder, if all of the food has been cooked in advance of Yom Tov. As stated above any prohibition that might exist has nothing to do with the seder per se, it has to do with restrictions about holiday preparations. There are a zillion reasons to mitigate this prohibition. Perhaps a nonJew ...


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Nitei Gavriel Pesach 2 Chapter 105:6:7 brings it in the name of the Shela 170:1 which bases this Minhag on Mesechtas Sofrim 14:18.


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Along the lines of something the Maharal explains in Ch. 36 of Gevuros Hashem - The Maharal explains at length how many aspects of halachos of Pesach are meant to demonstrate the oneness and unity of Hashem. He discusses the idea of disparate elements coming together to form one unit: וצוה לאכול הפםח על מצות ומרורים להורות כי מאתו שהוא אחד יבאו ...


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I heard from Rabbi Yosef Fox the following: Perhaps the idea is to contrast the ideas of slavery and freedom, they are relatives. Through the side by side contrast emerges a greater understanding of what slavery is (under the whims and emotions of man) and what freedom is (under the system of mitzvoth that guide a person to a life of חכמה which is true ...


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Given the proliferation of published commentaries on the Haggada these days, I'm sure there are an abundance of answers to this question. The two most famous answers, though, come from earlier commentaries. The first from Abarbanel, who asks this in connection to what "לחם עוני" means. What is "poor bread"? Answering that "poor" refers to the composition of ...


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Here's an interesting perspective from Chabad.org: ... the poor person’s lack of possessions allows him a type of freedom from the burden of the physical world. True, his independence comes at a price that few of us would be willing to pay; still, conceptually he represents autonomy, and stands in stark contrast to the slave, who is completely tied to ...


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Dipping can be associated with the splitting of the sea (in Hallel), while reclining can be associated with the four cups of wine.


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The first two questions (assuming that we consider the 1st question to be the one about matzah, and the 2nd about maror) are answered quite directly just after the "Rabban Gamliel" section/ It explains why we eat matzah; another paragraph why we eat marror. Offhand, I don't know where the hagadah answers directly the last 2 questions about dipping & ...


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I'll deal with one potential aspect of your question, and hopefully others will be able to add more: to what extent are the questions in Mah Nishtanah answered within the text of Mah Nishtanah itself? This issue is discussed at length by Prof. Richard C. Steiner of Yeshiva University, in an article titled, "On the Original Structure and Meaning of Mah ...


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The main point is that one is not allowed to cook for a gentile on Yom Tov. As a result, one should not invite a guest. A maid or waiter can be served because they will not expect extra food to be cooked for them. Halachos Series on Hilchos Shabbos May one invite a gentile on Yom Tov to eat at the Yom Tov table? There definitely is a serious ...


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Kulanu, as the others have said, means that everyone leans. How to square that with the fact that not everyone is required (or even allowed in some cases) to lean is asked by the Natai Gavriel. In a nutshell, his answer is leaning is about showing the autonomy and freedom of liberation, and that we all participate in the action of showing the liberation of ...


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The term "anachnu" means "we" and "kulanu" means "all of us" (as it has the word "kol" meaning "all" or "complete" / "everything".) While these 2 terms may seem to have the same meaning, there is an important difference. "Kulanu" implies unity. For example, in parshat Miketz, when Yoseph accuses teh brothers of being spies, Yehuda says, "Kulanu b'nai ish ...


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כֻּלָּנוּ means "we all": he's asking about the fact that all the people recline. (Source: my knowledge of Hebrew.) That answers most of your question, and I hope others can answer the rest.


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I intend to, if that's of any value. I also hope to put together a Heb/Eng version for next year.


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My minhag is that one should not drink the wine dipped for the plagues so as not to gain pleasure from the suffering of the Egyptians the spilled drops represent. It is not cursed, rather the drinking of it is accursed.


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This text was written when the Temple stood and people were eating sacrifices. In fact, all sacrificial bread (other than a few from the Thanksgiving offering) were non-leavened, year-round. Furthermore, on any other run-of-the-mill night of the year you'd see Jews in Jerusalem eating a Thanksgiving sacrifice, and along with it some leavened bread, and some ...


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The אגישמקע וורט on the Haggadah writes that both the Alshich and the Arugas HaBosem say this vort. And I saw in one of the commentaries that the explanation of this vort is that when it says in the Haggadah to blunt the teeth of the wicked son, it means to you should endeavor to remove from him his wickedness so that he becomes a Tzaddik.


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The sefer Binyan Ariel here writes: According to what would appear to be the simple understanding of this stanza - that on all other nights we can eat either chametz or matzah, whichever our heart desires - it should have written “we eat either chametz or matzah”, like it wrote in the last stanza “we eat either sitting or ...


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The Haggadah does not say that we would still all be slaves today, nor does it say that we would be slaves. It says: “And if the Holy One, Blessed be He, had not taken our forefathers out of Egypt, behold, we (see below) and our children and our children’s children (three generations only) would have been subjugated (but not slaves) to Pharaoh in ...


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R. Shlomo Kluger in his explanation of the Haggadah here says that even if Yisrael had not been commanded the Torah they would have known it by themselves, just like the patriarchs knew the whole Torah. As the Alshich explains, when Yisrael came to Mount Sinai the spiritual impurity that was in them from the sin of Adam HaRishon went away, and therefore they ...


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There are certainly explanations of how the answer to the wicked son is not dismissive, such as the explanation from the Previous Lubavitcher Rebbe that the message is that he wouldn't have been redeemed from there, but in the final redemption all will be included even him. And the Arizal says that each cup in the Seder corresponds to each of the sons, in ...


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The Rambam (Hilcos Chometz Umatza 8:2) refers to the leader of the seder as הקורא - the reader. ואחר כך עוקרין את השולחן, מלפני קורא ההגדה לבדו In fact, the Rambam even has the leader of the seder read the Ma Nishtana: וכאן הבן שואל ואומר הקורא, מה נשתנה הלילה הזה מכל הלילות וכו This implies that the leader of the seder reads everything according ...


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The Hagadah of the באר מים here explains that when the Rasha asks “What is this service to you?” he is also asking “and the reward for this service”, because he does not believe that there is a reward for doing mitzvos. Therefore he repudiates one of the fundamental beliefs (עיקרים) of the Torah - that there is reward and punishment for our deeds.


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The הגדה שלמה - (one of Rav M. M. Kasher's 3 Hagadot) says: From [Machzor?] Vitri ולפי שהוציא את עצמו מן הכלל של עבודת הקב"ה כפר בעיקר: שכל ככופר במצוותיו כאלו כפר בו כדכתיב ועשיתם את כל מצותי וסמיך ליה אני ה' א-לקיכם


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The wicked son says מה העבודה הזאת לכם, which basically means "Why are you bothering with this stupidity" as the Yerushalmi says "למה אתם טורחים את כל הטרחה הזאת כל שנה ושנה". Essentially, this is a denial of the binding character of the laws of the Torah on all the Jews, which is clearly a violation of one of the basic principle of Judaism.


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Most of the haggadah texts that I have seen have the form without the 'and' וּלְפִי שֶׁהוֹצִיא אֶת־עַצְמוֹ מִן הַכְּלָל, כָּפַר בָּעִקָּר Chabad translates this as The wicked son, what does he say? "What is this service to you?"7 [By saying,] "to you," [he implies]: "but not to himself." Since he has excluded himself from the people at large, he ...


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Rav Yehuda made a siman for the 10 makkas D’tzach ,A’dash ,B’achav three distinct classes. The Kli Yakar explains why three separate classes. The מהרי"א explains that Paroh argued on three points 1)He didn’t believe in Hashem 2) Even if Hashem existed he created the world but doesn’t get involved. 3) He believed even if Hashem is involved he can’t change ...


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The Encyclopaedia Judaica, cited in the Wikipedia article linked in the comments above, states as follows: Eḥad Mi Yode'a is first found in Haggadot of the 16th century and only in those of the Ashkenazi ritual. Many scholars believed that it originated in Germany in the 15th century. Perles showed its similarity to a popular German pastoral song, "Guter ...


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12: בבא מציעא ד,ו אם היה מכירה, אפילו לאחר שנים עשר חודש מקבלה הימנו 13: תענית א,ו שלוש עשרה תענייות על הציבור


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6 Rosh Hashana 1:3 - על שישה חודשים שלוחים יוצאים Eiduyot 5:1 - שישה דברים מקולי בית שמאי, ומחומרי בית הלל Taharot 4:5 - על שישה ספקות, שורפין את התרומה 11 Brachot 7:3 - אחד עשרה, ואחד עשר ריבוא ?? (tried) 12 Horiot 1:6 - שנים עשר שבטים מביאין שנים עשר פרים Keilim 29:3 - חוט משקולת, שנים עשר


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Mechon Mamre searching makes this easier. It looks like 11 hasn't been filled in yet, so here are a few options: Niddah 4:7 -- כל אחד עשר יום, בחזקת טהרה. Niddah 5:6 -- בת אחת עשרה שנה ויום אחד, נדריה נבדקין Middot 2:6 -- עזרת ישראל הייתה אורך מאה ושלושים וחמש, על רוחב אחת עשרה My personal favorite, considering the name of the song: Sanhedrin 5:5 -- ...



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