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19

Taz (Orach Chaim 476:2) mentions such a custom. The people who did so were concerned that any kind of meat might be confused with roast (and as YS noted, the Ashkenazic custom is indeed not to eat roast meat at the Seder). However, he understands Tur to be saying that it is improper to do so, because the joy of Yom Tov includes eating meat; the best ...


17

One popular explanation: When the Jewish People reached Mount Sinai, the Torah (Ex. 19:2) describes their encampment in the singular form - ויחן שם ישראל נגד ההר. Rashi, citing Mechilta, states that this means that they really felt unified, "as one person, with one heart." That unity among Jews, then, was by itself worth reaching Sinai in order to achieve. ...


11

The Chabad minhag is to pour it back into the bottle after לשנה הבאה בירושלים. While this is being done, everyone at the table sings א-לי אתה ואודך to the tune composed by R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi.


11

Well, we do have the precedent that four-fifths (or even more) of the Jews in fact did not want to leave Egypt and serve Hashem, and died during the Plague of Darkness (Rashi to Exodus 13:18, quoting from Midrashim Mechilta and/or Tanchuma). So based on the attitude that this second son shows towards the mitzvos of Pesach, there is indeed a good likelihood ...


11

You need a more precise translation. Had God not taken us out of Egypt, then we, our children, and grandchildren would have been indebted to Pharaoh. Hebrew me-she-ubad, as used regarding real estate on lien for paying potential debts. Had things worked out for our release in other fashions, we would have still owed Pharaoh one. Only by the dramatic show ...


11

HaSeder Ha'aruch (134:9-13) collects several answers to this question: The wise son says "אתכם" since he did not personally hear the command, and he is referring to the generation which left Egypt. Since he mentions Hashem -"Which the L-rd, our G-d has commanded" he is not excluding himself. However, the wicked son who does not mention Hashem in his words ...


10

If there are three people who recite the Hallel together, the two responsive readings (the four verses ending "Ki LeOlam Chasdo" at the beginning of Psalm 118 and the four "Ana Hashem" verses toward the end of that psalm) are recited as in the Shul: the leader recites each of the "Ki LeOlam Chasdo" verses and the others answer "Hodu" [and the next verse ...


10

We were at the 49th rung of impurity. We were already idolaters. 4/5 of the Jews didn't want to leave. If we would have waited a little more we would have gotten to the 50th rung which means we would have been too far gone. The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains that is why we had to run out of Egypt. The evil was still strong and we went out only because of ...


10

Similar to what @ShmuelBrin said, but on more of a psychological level: As brought by theyeshiva.net, The Maharal of Prague (Gevurot Hashem 61) explains what happened when the Jews left Egypt: The Exodus of Egypt, he suggests, was not merely a political and geographical event, in which slave laborers were allowed to leave a country and forge their own ...


10

A few ideas: Get into "round-table" discussions related to the Exodus somehow, in which everyone is encouraged to voice their opinions on the subject at hand. For example, citing the midrash about how the redemption was deserved by the Jews for not changing their "Jewish" attire and names can incite a socio-historical discussion about the role of ...


10

The gemara (P'sachim 119b) mentions the prohibition of eating after the the final matzah (which is known nowadays as the afikoman). There are different opinions among the poskim as to the reason for this. The Rashbam (ad loc., s.v. אין מפטירין אחר המצה אפיקומן) writes that the reason is to prevent attenuating the taste of the matzah, which is eaten as a ...


9

If you're having guests or relatives who might not be familiar with the Hebrew, get something with English translation, and preferably enough copies so you can call out page numbers for everyone. Rabbi Hershel Shachter feels that everyone at the table should have the same Hebrew text. (Although many different Hagadas use the same Hebrew text, just with ...


8

Machzor Vitry (sec. 65) attributes them to Rashi. This site says that it has also been attributed to R. Shmuel of Falaise, one of the Tosafists (mid-13th century), but that the true authorship is unknown. (It was actually originally just one of a lot of mnemonics for the order of the Haggadah composed by various rishonim. Another one, from Maharam ...


8

It seems like you wanted some practical tips. I have run many successful sedarim with differently engaged Jews. There are a couple of things that I do to engage people who may not be initially interested in sharing their thoughts. Go around the table and have everyone finish a sentence "slavery is..." "freedom is..." Do some prep work and print out a ...


8

Strangely enough, I have found that those who aren't interested will tend to go with the flow if you state from the outset that you're going to read through the Hagadah. It will be dry. It may be boring. But if they are mature enough (not particularly opposed to ritual, and your question implies that they are not), just give everyone a Hagadah and say you're ...


8

DailyHalacha.com says that the reciting of the Hagadah is based on ‘VeHigadata LiBincha BaYom HaHu Lemor.’ The Ritvo and the Gr"a had only the head of the household read it. Rabbi Mansour's custom however, is that all recite the Hagadah together word by word. From time to time they pause the reading, and the Ba’al Habayit or somebody that is fluent in the ...


8

Shulchan Aruch (OC 476:2) writes that those who have the custom not to eat roasted meat on the Seder nights refrain from eating any type of meat that requires slaughtering, including chicken. Although the Korban Pesach could not be offered from such meat, we are still concerned people may come to permit other types of roast. However fish meat is ...


7

I'd have to find the source, but one of the answers I remember learning is based on the Talmud (Makkot 23B-24A). There (also brought in this answer), the Talmud tells us that the verse (Devarim 33:4) "תּוֹרָה צִוָּה לָנוּ מֹשֶׁה מוֹרָשָׁה קְהִלַּת יַעֲקֹב", hints to the 611 commandments that were given to us by Moshe. "תּוֹרָה" is the numerical value of ...


7

I bought and used the haggadah for my second seder (which I did not lead) and can now answer my question of a week ago. General Look It has a dual cover: the left side in English and leading to the English discussion of the haggadah and the right side in Hebrew leading straight into the Hebrew haggadah. One possible downside is that on the English side of ...


7

Good question. The same question comes up with all the blessings regarding a second-day yom tov on the Diaspora; e.g. kiddush and shehechiyanu on the second night of Sukkot, Shavuot, and Shmini Atzeret. Until the Jewish calendar was fixed in place (around the year 500 or so), those in the Diaspora were keeping two days, going "maybe yom tov is really ...


7

Kadesh is the masculine singular imperative: make kidush! (or: sanctify!) It's also a bare infinitive. Urchatz or r'chatz is the masculine singular imperative: (and) wash! Karpas is a matter of much discussion, but it's some sort of vegetable. Yachatz is the masculine singular third-person future tense transitive: He will divide. Magid is the masculine ...


7

Just to add to @Michoel's answers I have my own thought. Have a look at the Posuk by the Chacham, it says there, when your son will ask you. By the Rasha however, it says when when he will tell you. There is a famous story of an Apikores who told a Gadol that he had many questions on Judaism. The Rov told him he can answer questions, but he cant answer ...


6

To show how much they love the mitzva. (Mekor Chaim - Chavos Yair) Based on the Mishna in Pesachim that says the children grab the Matza so they shouldn't fall asleep. (Chasam Sofer) Dogs watch the house from burglars. On the night of Pesach the dogs did not bark therefore they were vulnerable to thieves. As a Zecher to this we steal the Afikoman. ...


6

Aside from the other excellent answers listed here, two points: 1) Dayeinu does not mean that it would have been enough for us, as in it being an end in itself, but rather than it would have been sufficient cause for us to give praise to Hashem. See here for further elaboration. Each step in the process was wonderful and deserving of our praise. 2) This ...


6

From "The Historical Haggada," by R' Nachman Cohen (p. 14): Of the three matzot on the table, why is it that the middlte matza is the one which is broken? The halakhic answer is: On Pesach three matzot are required. One for lechem o'ni (poor man's bread) and two for lechem mishna (the two loaves required on each Shabbat and Yom Tov). Since it is ...


6

There are many explanations, meanings and innuendos. Here are a few: Avraham served the Angles-disguised-as-men three loaves when they arrived at his home. That was on Pesach. We compare the Matzah to "poor man's bread" an a poor man always puts some away for later, hence the "break and hide" routine of the middle matzah. Plus, hiding a piece of Matzah ...


6

Netziv, in the introduction to his commentary on the Hagadah, Imrei Shefer, notes that some say the reason for the kittel is to remind one of death, and we shouldn't be too happy on seder night. He rejects this reason out-of-hand. He suggests instead that we're recreating the experience of eating the Passover offering, and has sources to indicate that ...


6

There's a similar case discussed if you forget e.g. yaleh v'yavo by mincha and only remember after nightfall. You repeat shemoneh esrei even though you don't say over yaleh v'yavo. It seems like it doesn't accomplish anything, but at least that shemoneh esrei was done correctly. So perhaps here too, the eating would be correct even though not leaning. Though ...


6

According to the hagada by the author of K'sav Sofer (which seems to be called Seder Lel Hiskadesh Chag?) the kos shel b'racha of birkas hamazon should be used for sheva b'rachos as well because the birkas hamazon catalyzes the sheva b'rachos anyway and is therefore not serving a double purpose (which could be problematic). In addition he brings down a ...


6

R' Moshe Cordovero (Ramak), in his commentary Tefillah Lemoshe on the siddur, lists the following: For each of the Ten Plagues - the respective manifestations of "af," "evrah," "zaam," "tzarah," and "mishlachas mal'achei ra'im" that were evident in each one - totaling fifty (as per R' Akiva). The fifty plagues at the Sea. For some of them he lists ...



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