Hot answers tagged

7

The Encyclopedia of Jewish Prayer: The Ashkenazic and Sephardic Rites (Macy Nulman) has the following on the beating of the heart during Viduy When saying Ashamnu we stand somewhat bent over, without leaning on any kind of support, just as in reciting Modim (MB, 607:10 ; Magen Avraham 607:4), a position of abject humility and contrition. One should ...


6

No, one cannot. Mythbusters determined experimentally that earwax candles are not effective: The skin cells, hair, fatty acids and cholesterol contained in earwax combust quickly and at different rates, which means the icky substance won't stick around long enough to keep the flame on the wick. Given that an earwax candle won't burn, it would not be ...


4

Chapter 3 (p. 46 here): ונתבונן כי אם יבכה האדם מרוב מכאוביו ומרוב צרותיו אז יזלו מים מעיניו, על מה עשה ה׳ ככה כי ירדו מים מעינים ולא מאברים אחרים, אם יד או רגל או אבר אחר נלקה, העינים מורידים דמעות, מפני מה העינים יבכו בעד כל אברי הגוף, כי הוא זה מפני כי עיני האדם המה ראשית לכל חטאת, ובעבור חטאותיו בא האדם במצוקותיו, ולכן בעת כי יצר לאדם ורע ...


4

In the Artscroll Schottenstein edition of Niddah, I found one diagram of the halachic anatomy as understood by Rashi, in footnote 5 on page 17b1 (mouseover to view): See the rest of the notes there for context and explanation. As it happens, this chapter was elucidated by one of my high school rabbeim, R' Moshe Zev Einhorn.


3

Rav Nissim Karelitz, based on the Ramban and Ritva in Niddah 13a, holds Chut Shani on Even HaEzer siman 21that there is an issur for a woman to entertain or cause sexual thoughts. The issur is "de'megarei yetzer hara be'nafsheyhu" and not "ve'nishmartah mikol davar rah". The reason why ve'nishmartah does not apply is because there is no issur of wasting ...


2

The Arizal (Pri Eitz Chaim, Shaar Mikrah Kodesh, ch. 4) related it to the idea "Peh sach" - "a mouth converses" (as noted by sam in a comment). This can also be connected to the mitzvah of magid. See also: http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pagefeed/hebrewbooks_org_52839_131.pdf : The Arizal taught that the word "Pesach" is composed of the words peh sach, ...


2

My rav gave a drasha during Yom Kippur related to the expression בוחן כליות which means, literally "checks the kidneys". The adrenal glands are located on top of each kidney. Adrenaline is one of several hormones that increase or decrease excitement. The metaphor of בוחן כליות is that G-d is checking how excited you are in performing mitzvot. Other than ...


2

Likely, the reference is to the story in I Samuel 5-6 where the Philistines captured the Ark of the Covenant in battle, and were stricken with hemorrhoids and rats whilst they held on to it. After 7 months, they returned the Ark to the Jews along with an offering of 5 Golden Hemorrhoids and 5 Golden Rats from the 5 Philistine cities. It's not unusual for ...


2

To borrow from the answer of @Mefaresh here: Tzitz Eliezer, part 7, 2:14 concludes that if he washed his head and his hair is clean, even a person who scratches the roots of his hairs does not need to wash his hands.


2

Gabe, I just saw the Ramban write* about the human body, and how no part of it should be considered disgusting or ugly. This part, according to him, is just the same as a hand or a foot or a nose. Hashem made it. The fact that one has an erection should make no difference to his saying Modeh Ani, as long as he is appropriately covered for tzniyut reasons. ...


1

The Gemara says that they gave Malkus to someone who was able to avoid tearing the Besulim, since it showed that he had much experience. There was a special blessing that was said upon seeing the blood. This suggests that there is something special about seeing the open witness to the purity. Chazal allowed Be'ilas Mitzva on Shabbos because it is ...


1

modeh ani is said without washing ones hands when one is actually tamei. as soon as one wakes up in the morning the appropriate thing to do is to sit up and acknowledge the creator for returning your soul to you. this is done regardless of the state one is in. (tehilas Hashem annotated edition page 586 discuses saying modeh ani in a very bikitzur manner) ...


1

It is a tolada (corollary) of gozez (shearing). See, e.g., DailyHalacha.com: The Gemara addresses the related issue of cuticles – pieces of skin around the nail that become detached. The rule established in this regard is that if the piece of skin is mostly detached, and it is “facing upward,” then one may remove it on Shabbat. The Rishonim (Medieval ...


1

Shemirat Shabbath Kehilchata 35 (32) forbids removing warts or dry skin. Small pieces of skin which are still connected cannot be removed either.


1

See this article . My inference from this is that considering that there was a debate regarding shaving in general, plus even for those opinions that prohibit shaving, there's a debate if that means only the beard, there are leniencies to rely upon regarding shaving your neck. As there is no consensus, from what I can tell, CYLOR. If you DO shave your ...


1

Rav moshe says (even Ezer Chelek 1 siman 69) that while it's a violation of BOTH lo tasuru AND vinishmarta mikol davar ra (since it leads to shichvat zera levatala) for a man, for a woman would STILL be in violation of lo tasuru EVEN THOUGH there is no concern for zera. So Rav Moshe clearly rules that it's ossur.


1

That would depend on how connected the milk inside the udders is to the cow. Conceptually, a kosher, slaughtered cow with milk in it's udders can be cooked and eaten with that milk de'oraysa, but may be assur midirabannan. That implies we view the milk as still incorporated with the cow. Therefore, if the cow becomes assur, the milk in it's udders is assur ...


1

The original question as well as @SAH challenge seem to imply that the Torah forbids piercings. This belief is possibly coming from the prohibition of tatoos as the prohibition to injure oneself. But as we will say the halacha doesn't necessarily consider all body piercings forbidden. As context, plastic surgery (a more extreme form of bodily injury for ...


1

I argue here based on the Gemara (Makos 21a), the Shulchan Aruch (YD § 180), and other sources, that when (1) a particular tattoo is in fact non-idolatrous; and (2) the very nature of the particular tattoo is such that it can be objectively presumed to be non-idolatrous, it is permissible under normative halacha. This applies, for example, to permanent ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible