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16

There is a little known Chassidic text published in 1834 entitled Pri Yitzchak that details all 613 Mitzvot and the corresponding limbs for positive mitzvot and 365 Gidim for negative commandments. It has not been translated from the Hebrew. It is a very sophisticated work. He uses the list of halachic limbs listed in the Mishna, and uses the Rambam's list ...


12

Well according to Wikipedia, here's the list of organs that can currently be transplanted from a living donor. For something like a kidney donation, the donor has two and gives one. For something like a liver donation, they take a piece from the donor, which he can live without (and will be enough to help the recipient): Lung Kidney Liver Intestine ...


12

The best development I've seen on this is Rabbi Yehuda Herzl Henkin's Contemporary Tseni'ut. It appeared in Tradition 37:3 (2003), as well as its own book. The Tradition article is available online, paid subscription required. Here's his conclusion, as relates to your question: It emerges from Rashi, Yerushalmi and Korban ha-Eda that peritsut in ...


11

See this comprehensive survey at Aish, about plastic surgery in general. It mentions this kohen reason, in the name of Rabbi Menashe Klein, in his Mishneh Halachos, and (IIUC) Rav Shlomo Zalman Aurbach. But others permit for very different reasons: Thus: In 1961, Rabbi Immanuel Jakobovits, considered by many to be the father of the discipline of Jewish ...


11

after the circumcision, the foreskin is buried (some prepare a dish with dirt in it to "bury" the foreskin immediately). Some bury it in earth that has a new tree planted in it as a symbolic connection but the operative point is respect and burial for the body part. cf Do surgically removed body parts require Kevurah? the comments on the question which ...


9

The classic Sefer Chareidim by R' Elazar Azikri (d.1600) catalogs all the mitzvos according to body parts. (R' Elazar Azikri was also the author of the poem, Yedid Nefesh.) An abbreviated version, Kitzur Sefer Chareidim, was written by R' Avraham Danzig, author of the Chayei Adam. The sefer does not attempt to establish a precise one-for-one match for each ...


9

The Mishnah in Sotah 45b cites a dispute between R' Eliezer, R' Akiva and R' Eliezer ben Yaakov as to whether the measurement is done from the corspe's navel, from his nose, or from his neck. The halachah follows R' Akiva, that the measurement is done from the nose. For further details, see R' Chaim Kanievsky's comprehensive Nachal Aysan, siman 5 #5.


9

There are many explanations to the significance of creating Eve from Adam's rib. By the way, it's not a universal opinion that "tzela" should be translated as "rib" (Hazal have also transalted it as "side," which works with the midrash of them being originally joined together). Going with the "rib" translation, here are a few explanations. Bereshit Rabbah ...


8

Biblical mitzvos are in bold. Items that are minhagim or otherwise are not mitzvos are listed for completeness but are not bold. -- Each is followed by the corresponding (set of) body part(s) 30 days of blowing shofar (in Elul) -- 30 in the feet 10 offerings brought on Rosh Hashana -- 10 in the ankles 2 approaches to the aron(?) -- 2 in the shins 5 people ...


8

The Talmud (Berakhot 13b) is the original source for this custom. Here there is a mention of Rabbi Judah the Prince covering his eyes while he said the Shema to block out the distractions of the students around him. This behavior was codified in the Shulhan Arukh (OH 61:4-5). from ...


7

Nechpa B'Kesef Vol 2 Even Hoezer 19 says that the prohibition from the Torah is specifically to avoid actual relations, and one who is unable to have relations there is no prohibition. However, he says, it is definitely prohibited M'Drabanan, and it is disgusting and the way of fools.


7

Tzitz Eliezer (Vol. 6, Siman 40, Perek 22, Ois 8, and Vol. 7 Siman 46 and Vol. 12 Siman 67) says that it is allowed. However, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein (Iggros Moshe Even HaEzer Vol. 4 Siman 65 Ois 10) says only rabbinic Yichud is allowed, but cases which are forbidden Biblically are not.


6

Just to add to the many valid opinions already brought down, Hacham Ovadia Yosef (Yabia Omer C"M 8:12) permits all forms of plastic surgery for both married and unmarried women and men, as long as they do it by a professional to minimize the risk. Here is the relevant conclusion: מסקנא דדינא נראה שיש להתיר לנערה לעשות ניתוח פלסטי כדי לשפר את צורתה ...


6

To quote the Aish Rabbi: According to Jewish law, a vasectomy is absolutely forbidden. And for sources for more info: Maimonides (Laws of Forbidden Relations, Chapter 16), and in the Code of Jewish Law (Even Ha'ezer, Chapters 5 and 16) And there may even be problems with getting married and/or remaining married with one. ((I noticed that you ...


6

The Tzitz Eliezer has a famous responsum (שו"ת ציץ אליעזר ח"י סי’ כ"ה פרק כ"ו קטע ו) where he states that we go by the external organs in determining gender, and sex changes are effective in changing one's halachic gender. However, there are other opinions that sex changes do not change halachic gender; I assume that according to these opinions, gender is ...


5

According to Ben Ish Hai I Miqes (S"Q 7) כשיגיע לק"ש קודם פרשת התמיד יזהר לומר פסוקים שמע ישראל ובשכמל"ו בכונה גדולה כמו ק"ש דיוצר, הן בסגירות עיניו When one reaches the Qeriat Shema prior to Parashat HaTamid he should be scrupulous to say Shema and Baruch Shem with great intention like the Keriat Shema of Yoser (Ohr). Including closing the eyes...


5

You can find the entire text first forty pages online here, and then need to pay in order to download the rest. You don't need to register in order to get rid of that annoying pop-up: just click to enter the site as a guest. As you can see, the full title is פרי יצחק: כולל ביאור תרי"ג מצות ברמז, and the author is Rabbi Yitzhak ben Tzvi Hirsch. It was first ...


5

The foreskin is not repulsive. Its removal is the mark of the covenant between G-d and the Jewish people. As non-Jews have no obligation to remove it (and in fact perhaps should specifically not do do) and as non-Jews are not inherently repulsive, it stands to reason that neither is the foreskin. There are deep kabbalistic reasons for the existence of the ...


5

Yes, see Aruch Hashulchan OC 75:7 who puts brachas part of the prohibition , but gives a reason why it is mutar (only uncovered hair ) nowadays. See also Mishna Berura 74:16 on making a bracha in mikvah. However,many disagree and hold that ervah still applies in our times concerning hair being uncovered .


5

One issue dealt with by pos'kim is the prohibition against wounding oneself. Rabbi Moshe Feinstein in a letter reprinted in Igros Moshe (Choshen Mishpat Ⅰ 103) says that it is permissible to donate blood even though there is no known recipient now, in a case where the donor gets paid for his donation; part of his reasoning is that bloodletting, long thought ...


5

Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 66:10 (from Kerisus 21b) states: "Human blood, if it is separated from his body, is forbidden because of appearances (maris ayin). Thus, if one bit into a piece of bread and blood came out from his gums onto it, he must scrape that portion off. On the other hand, if it is still between one's teeth, he may suck it out." Rashi to ...


5

I don't understand the question. The statement that a person who saves one life, saves the world is an aggadic statement, not a halachic one. Halacha does not allow you to sacrifice one life for the sake of many. If you save a life, that is a great and wonderful thing. If you think you are saving a life, but don't actually do so, it doesn't take away the ...


5

This sect is referred to by many today with a mixture of amusement, frustration, and annoyance. Most will tell you that they are bringing the rules of modesty to an unprecedented extreme for which there is no source nor Jewish tradition. However, a while ago on the Seforim Blog, Marc Shapiro addressed this sect (which he calls the "Jewish Taliban Women"), ...


5

Tikkunei Zohar (introduction, 4b, passim) associates these with the verse (Ex. 3:15, זה שמי לעלם וזה זכרי לדר דר - "This is My name forever, and this is My remembrance for all generations." The reference there is to the Four-Lettered Name of Hashem, י-ה-ו-ה. Each of the terms in that verse ("My Name" and "My remembrance"), then, relates to one half of that ...


5

Someone asked this question online to Rabbi Yitzhak ben Yosef (posek and rabbi of Ramat Gan) here, and he responded as follows: בהחלט שאלה נדירה ביותר. לכאורה כל תינוק הוא פטר רחם וצריכים שני הילדים פדיון צריך לבדוק האם הם פטר רחם דהיינו שלכול רחם יש פתח נפרד. This is an extremely rare case. Seemingly, each infant is the"opener of the womb" and ...


5

Nefesh HaChaim Shaar Gimmel Perek Beis(1): אבל אדון כל ית"ש הוא מלא את כל העולמות והנבראי' ואינם חוצצים חלילה נגדו יתב' כלל באמת. ואין עוד מלבדו ית' ממש שום דבר כלל בכל העולמות. מהעליון שבעליונים עד התהום התחתון שבתהומות הארץ. עד שתוכל לומר שאין כאן שום נברא ועולם כלל רק הכל מלא עצמות אחדותו הפשוט ית"ש. Perek Gimmel(2): שאם ח"ו יקחנו לבנו לקבוע לנו ...


4

Alex beat me by a minute here, but nonetheless: The Talmud talks about all sorts of things! Interestingly enough, the Biblical prohibition on non-kosher animals doesn't apply to humans. (Hence, all human milk is theoretically kosher.) However if you have a cup of blood sitting on the table here, the rabbis of the Talmud said don't drink it. Even if it's ...


4

This article from Yeshiva Net News says plastic surgery of all types is becoming increasingly accepted in the Israeli Haredi community, and quotes one case of a woman who was given an allowance by her rabbi to have augmentative surgery as her appearance was causing marital strife. Rabbi Jachter discusses more about the theory behind halacha and plastic ...


4

Halachic requirements to allow men to pray in the presence of women differ somewhat from modesty requirements incumbent upon the woman when in the presence of others. Appropriate dress (according to the lenient opinions) when praying in the presence of others, is as follows: The halacha is that "tefach b'isha ervah" - a tefach (about 3.5 inches) uncovered ...



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