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19

Perhaps they are referring to the idea mentioned here. That is one shouldn't invite anyone to a bris as declining such an invitation would be bad (Rema Yoreh Deah 265:12). But if you don't receive an invitation at all, one can choose not to show up.


16

R' Yonasan Eibeschutz explains as follows: When Esther entered Achashverosh's throne room, a place full of idols, the Divine Presence left her (Megillah 15b). She realized, then, that such a place is not suitable for a miracle to take place. So she was going to have to get Achashverosh someplace where none of these would be present in order to be successful ...


8

Much depends on the household of the friends. There are a variety of possible practices and traditions which you might encounter but not everyone has the exact same take on everything. For example, if they have yet to light their Channukiah (the 9 branched candelabra) you might watch them do that and sing 3 blessings. They might say the blessings in ...


7

From "The Jewish Way in Death and Mourning" by Maurice Lamm: Community business meetings, such as synagogue or fraternal organization membership meetings, are permitted the mourner after shiva. Social dinners, even though no music is played, and even though they are held for charitable causes, are not to be attended by mourners for parents ...


7

The source is Medrash Esther Rabba 7:13 See here: אמר רבי יצחק נפחא המן הרשע בעלילה גדולה בא על ישראל הה"ד ובמלאת הימים האלה עשה המלך לכל העם הנמצאים בשושן הבירה וגו' ואין העם האמור כאן אלא ישראל הה"ד (דברים ל"ג) אשריך ישראל מי כמוך עם נושע בה' וגו', אמר המן לאחשורוש אלהיהם של אלו שונא זמה העמד להם זונות ועשה להם משתה וגזר עליהם שיבואו כולם ויאכלו וישתו ...


6

Some of the various reasons given in the g'mara (M'gila 15 amud 2) for Ester's inviting Haman — such as to make sure the Jews not depend on her being their friend in high places and cease praying, to appear to be befriending Haman so as to get him killed, and that pride comes before a fall — are strengthened by her giving two parties rather than ...


5

Well I found the probable source in R. Akiva Eiger's responsa (vol. 1 ch. 29) where his uncle R. Binyomin Wolf Eiger make a feast in honor of R. Akiva Eiger's wedding. R. Akiva Eiger responds (ibid ch. 30) תודות אלף אל אדוני על הדבר אשר עשה לשמוח ביום שמחתי בפומני והוא אות נאמן על עזוז אהבהו, אם כי לא ידעתי על מה, ותשואות חן לכם...וכו A thousand ...


5

Haman and the King were the guests. However, as nobility there were servants and "members of the staff" there. The modern concepts of privacy did not exist in those days. Consider that a noble would be able to sit down without considering if a chair was there, because one would "miraculously" appear under him. Thus, Charvonah was standing there waiting to be ...


2

Nitei Gavriel Nisuin1 49:2 in the name of Teshuras Shai 2:150, Imrei Yosher 2:23, MaHarash Engel 5:53, and Shem M'Shimon 9 mentions that no Tenaim are done by a Zivug Sheini, only a Kinyan. He does not mention by this the reason of Luchos Sheini. In 49:3 footnote he mentions that no invitations are sent for a Zivug Sheini wedding similar to the Luchos Sheini ...


2

The Baby shower is a modern concept, based on consumerism. Modern Era The modern baby shower started after WWII during the baby boom era and evolved with the consumer ideology of 1950s and 1960s. In other words, baby showers in the mid-twentieth century not only served an economic function by providing the mother-to-be and her home with material ...


2

To the best of my knowledge there is no known source that prohibits baby showers, however most Orthodox Jews generally do not have baby showers for fear of Ayin Hara - evil eye.


2

The Tora T'mima (note 16, to chapter 5 verse 4) gives, in the G'ra's name, something that may perhaps also serve as a reason she wanted to put off her revelation a day: she wanted him handy at sof nidasah, since that is a good time for instigating an argument between Haman and Achashverosh. (However, it's clear from there that she knew of this reason when ...


2

According to this article the cheer has anti-semitic origins. It developed from a war-cry meaning “Jerusalem is fallen” - in Latin Hieroslyma est perdita .


2

Oz Nidbaru 7:65:2 says that one may throw invitations with Pesukim on them into the garbage, so long they are wrapped in something.


2

The laws vary from place to place. Many caterers have deals with charities to pick up the leftovers. As such, you really need to ask. Personally, I have asked a caterer for leftover pineapple boats, which I was happily given. (Dried pineapple is delicious!) To answer specifically: "Is it considered, then, a mitzvah to take these cakes as we know they will ...


1

This is almost certainly Ḥukath HaGoyim. Please see the answers there for more information on what makes something fall into that category, but in general, anything done with either no obvious origin (and no logical basis) or an idolatrous basis is prohibited. Debate about the permissibility of marking the first of January as the start of a new calendar ...


1

See the (fanciful) discussion here: http://onthemainline.blogspot.com/2009/12/vilna-gaon.html where it is suggested that the work HEP is an acronym for Haman, Amalek, Pharaoh which was said by the Jews against their foes in order to show how all previous enemies had all been defeated and so too would they. Thus it would seem to be a very appropriate Jewish ...


1

Your concerns are well-founded. While a number of bands are unaware of, or ignore, the clear health-related and halachic ramifications of loud music, it is certainly contrary to Jewish law to have loud music played at simchas (or otherwise). For an in-depth response and much more information on this matter, I would recommend Rabbi Forsythe's article "Dangers ...


1

Simplest answer: it builds a lot more suspense.



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