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1

Divrei Hayamim I 5:10 and 5:19-22 mentions a war between the two and a half tribes and the "Hagarites" in the time of Shaul (and there's a Midrash - right now I don't remember the location - that says that actually it was in the time of Yehoshua). So even if the Emorites were wiped out, there were certainly other dangerous tribes and nations.


4

Sure. We see in Yehoshua 1:13-15 that he reminds all two and a half tribes of "what Moshe the servant of Hashem commanded you," and after it's all over he calls all of them (Yehoshua 22:1-3) and praises them for keeping their word, using the same expression. Meshech Chochma explains why the condition wasn't explicitly mentioned by Moses to the half tribe of ...


2

The Art Scroll Chumash on Mattos 32:16 cites Abarbanel who says that they intended to rebuild and refortify the cities. I have seen in a number of places that had they left those remaining behind defenseless, the "inhabitants of the land" surrounding the areas captured would have moved in and conquered the areas occupied by Reuven and Gad. The Art Scroll ...


-2

Jair Ben Menashe had been responsible for conquering the territory and was given it by Moshe. (In particular the land of Bashan that had been previously ruled by Og). And therefore it was offered to him. This section of Devarim 3: 12-18 explains how the tribe of Menashe got involved, my source linked here: ...


2

There are a number of answers offered at http://www.aish.com/tp/i/moha/97763584.html The first two tribes, Reuven and Gad, were involved in the negotiations with Moshe from the outset. How did the tribe or part of the tribe of Menashe get themselves involved in this? The text itself is silent; therefore the commentaries feel free to offer different ...


0

This type of poetic symmetry is common in many places where "song" is used in Tana"ch. It is esp. common where nouns and verbs are used, but it is not unique to such construct (I.e. it could be noun / adjective). I'll use an example from the end of Mishlei as you should be familiar with these verses: Proverbs 31:10-11: אֵֽשֶׁת־חַ֭יִל מִ֣י יִמְצָ֑א ...


0

It's intentionally ambiguous. It may be that Saul was lying injured on the battlefield when the Amalekite came across him; it may be that the Amalekite totally fabricated the story. Either way, he knew that Saul viewed David as a threat, and therefore he could earn points with the new king by saying, "I killed your competitor!"


0

Just heard a lecture on this yesterday from Yael Ziegler. She theorized that the Amalekite is hoping for a reward from David. He assumes that David will be pleased at his "promotion". (Also as a member of Amalek he does not value human life as highly, and thus doesn't assume that David will have such strong positive feelings for Saul - there isn't space to ...


-1

As an answer one can say like this. But first one must ask: What is wrong with woman inheriting? Why was Moshe Rabainu unsure about it? What is so 'surprising' that the women 'wanted' the land who wouldn't? The answer is the Erets Yisroel comes at a price. It has a kedusha which has to be kept. Moshe was not sure that women were up to it. Hashem answered ...


1

(Unfortunately, I don't have the direct sources in the Talmud on hand for the answer that follows. I'd appreciate people editing them in or providing them in the comments.) The gemara states that Hashem performed a חסד for Israel when the temple was destroyed, because the trait of דין demanded absolute justice through destruction of the people, while Hashem ...


3

It says "animals" in verse 47. But if that's not enough for you, ibn Ezra clarifies that "animals" in verse 30 (which you translated "cattle") means animals not otherwise listed but "animals" in verse 47 means animals generally [i.e. including those listed in verse 30].


0

I recall hearing that it was an Horaas Shaa, a unique ruling just got that time. Perhaps, it can be understood that since the specific method of death was not commanded yet it was not a necessary part of the Hasraah. At that time the punishment consisted of the fact that he will get killed in some way. This is different from an התראת ספק, an unsure ...


5

Thank you Fred for sourcing it. The majority opinion in the Talmud is that a warning "this carries the death penalty" is sufficient, without specifying what method of execution. As Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan's Living Torah puts it: Since it was not specified what must be done to him, they placed him under guard. The death penalty was specified (Exodus ...


2

He didn't Pasken. He did for himself what he knew to be correct. We find in Eiruvin 63 that a learned student may check the Shechita knife for his own usage although it is seen as an honor usually given to the local Rav. The Issur of Paskenning in front of a Rebbi is even by simple Halachos which can be found in a Sefer by anyone. It is obvious that you ...



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