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2

See here from the Lubavitcher Rebbe: לקבלת התורה הוצרכה ההקדמה דאהבת ישראל To receive the Torah requires the preface of Ahavas Yisroel The same idea is found from the Rebbe Rashab (see the end of the link). It seems to be a common theme in Chassidic thought. The basis is the Mechilta brought by Rashi on Shemos 19:2.


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Rav Hirsch writes on that verse (Exodus 25:8 -- page 538 in the Shemos volume of this set), that the message of the Tabernacle is based on that verse: "ועשו לי מקדש ושכנתי בתוכם" -- "make for me a Mikdash, and I will dwell [שכן] in your midst." He writes that our mission ("ועשו לי מקדש," to build the Mikdash) results in ושכנתי בתוכם (the manifestation of the ...


5

Verse 3:22 would seem to indicate the former: וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים, הֵן הָאָדָם הָיָה כְּאַחַד מִמֶּנּוּ, לָדַעַת, טוֹב וָרָע; וְעַתָּה פֶּן-יִשְׁלַח יָדוֹ, וְלָקַח גַּם מֵעֵץ הַחַיִּים, וְאָכַל, וָחַי לְעֹלָם Here, עץ החיים is not modified with בתוך הגן, so evidently that is not part of its name, but rather a geographical indicator.


1

With regards to a mamzer (Devarim 23:3), see Maayano Shel Torah, quoting a teaching from HaRav HaKadosh of Ostrovska (perhaps the Zichron Shmuel) : A loose translation: Why does the Torah need to emphasize that a Mamzer is forbidden even after 10 generations? There is an opinion in the Talmud Yerushalmi that a berya, a complete creature can become ...


4

Maybe this link would be helpful: Its not scanned, so I dont know how reliable it is, but it seems like they typed all the Ba'al Shem Tov on the Torah text to this page... Hope it helps :)


4

Like many things, there are multiple possible answers to this question. The pshat is that this is the first line of a speech given by a person bringing their bikurim (first fruits) as an offering to the temple. Take a look at Deut 26.5-10 and note the whole speech. It's basically a brief synopsis of Jewish history - our forefathers went down to Egypt, were ...


2

The standard Jewish interpretation of the verse that most everyone will know, as that is what Rashi says, and that is what the Passover Haggadah does with the verse, is that the Armenian is Lavan, who sought to destroy my father (Jacob). A detour first about the root word here. אבד - means lost or destroyed. "Wandering" is fairly interpretive. The Ibn Ezra ...


0

I disagree with this translation. Let's look at the Hebrew text: וְעָנִיתָ וְאָמַרְתָּ לִפְנֵי יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ, אֲרַמִּי אֹבֵד אָבִי, וַיֵּרֶד מִצְרַיְמָה, וַיָּגָר שָׁם בִּמְתֵי מְעָט; וַיְהִי-שָׁם, לְגוֹי גָּדוֹל עָצוּם וָרָב. This verse is expounded upon in the Pesach Haggaddah. I don't have the exact text before me, but the gist of it is that "an ...


3

It seems to me that the first (נשני) is an active forgetfulness, and the second (שכחה) is passive. This we see from the gemora in Sanhedrin 102b which expounds that the name Menashe (ben Chizkiyohu) signifies that he caused Yisrael to forget Hashem. And even according to the Maharsha who disagrees with Rashi that נשני is an expression of forgetfulness and ...


7

They are synonyms. The latter is used per the GR"A (R' Elijah ben Shlomo Zalman Kremer, also known as the Vilna Gaon) to be a hint (remez) to the ego (the אני) - according to his exegesis, the entire story is an allegory for the journey of the soul in this world, and the אניה represents the body.


8

Malbim explains that ספינה (related to ספון, "concealed") is the lowest room of a ship (whereas אניה is the entire ship). Verse 5 is stressing that Yona descended to the lowest room so that he drown there. Were he higher in the ship, he reasoned, he may be thrown overboard and tossed on the waves until he reached land and survive.


6

Rav Shimshon Rafael Hirsch (R'ei - 11:30) says that the language (הלא המה) implies that the mountains were already known to the people. He also says that their difference from each other as well as the point that they were actually the first place that Avrohom built an altar could account for this. Note that as described, one mountain is lush and green and ...


1

It's also in Jasher 28:28 Adinah This book is also mentioned in Genesis.


1

Amazing website with exactly what you are looking for: http://www.vbm-torah.org/parshanut.html


0

According to Taanit 22b, Necho is talking about his idols (specifically "Avoda Zara"). Source (pdf, need to scroll down to 22b) Edit: Alternate source, Aramaic (no scrolling necessary). But he sent ambassadors to him, saying : What have I to do with thee, thou king of Judah? I come not against thee this day, but against the house wherewith I have ...


3

Rashi (on the two verses) says that the first is a reference to the bird of the Metzorah which is sent away live. It can be subsequently eaten and doesn't become forbidden as something used in the temple service. The second adds a violation of a positive commandment to the already existing negative commandment about eating non-Kosher birds (there is another ...


1

Adina. It comes from The Book of Enoch, I believe.



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