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3

Pausal forms don't always come on Etnachta or Silluk, though those are good examples of where a strong pause might be. Sometimes they come on second order disjunctives, like Zakef (Genesis 11:3, Ruth 4:18,22) or Tipcha (Genesis 23:11, Shemot 33:14) or Shalshelet (Vayikra 8:23). Here this is especially reasonable as the verse is such that the Tipcha on פסח ...


1

R Menachem Di Lonzano writes in his Derekh Chayim 108b that the Tipcha is on "Ani" so as to not sound like "I am God, your god, [and not that other god who is also your god]". He concludes: ולכן בכל אני ה' אלהיכם יש טרחא במלת אני לבד כשיבא מלת כי בתביר קודם לה לפי שאי אפשר לטרחא לבא אחר תביר אם לא במאריך באמצע.‏ And therefore in all "Ani Hashem ...


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An article on thetorah.com describes how it was the perceived duty of the Egyptian king to keep cosmic balance. The article suggests that after accidentally taking Sarai, Pharaoh had to do something positive for Avram in return. The relevant quotation from the article is below. The king carries a special role as the sole mediator between the Egyptians ...


1

One of the purposes of halakhic Midrash was the exegesis of the Bible. In this regard, the halakhic midrash extant for the Book of Exodus comes from the school of R. Ishmael, which is the Mekhilta of Rabbi Ishmael. The word Mekhilta comes from the Aramaic word מכילתא, which means a collection of rules of interpretation, which is what we today would call ...


0

The Talmud (Megilah 13A) does not reference the Hebrew word for wife, but the Hebrew word for someone in the inner family circle. In this regard, the Talmud here draws the comparison to 2 Sam 12:3, where Uriah the Hittite had groomed young Bathsheba to be his wife. The Greek Septuagint therefore translates the passage here in Esther as follows: When her ...


0

Esther said in Tehillim, liphnei kelev yechidasi. Hashem you have bowed down before a dog (Achashveirosh) my yechidah (the most sublime part of the neshama). So who is speaking (i.e. how can Esther talk about her neshamah as something owned by her and external to her)? This implies that because of the situation Esther was forced into she was forced to ...


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A full Shabbos-friendly Hebrew set is available here. This is the full version of his commentary, not censored, although it is lacking in notes (as I gather from Daniel Klein's introduction to his English translation of Shemot).


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in chovos halevavos shaar bechina "It is proper that you should know that the whole world (even inanimate things - Tov Halevanon) is synthesized of the physical and the spiritual, so intimately mixed and fused, that each of them sustains the other, like body and soul in living creatures." pas lechem commentary there on the words "like body and ...


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I think the simplest answer is probably the best. It only makes sense if it happened that particular night. It couldn't have been "one night". It was that night, ie.,, the night after the conversation with his wife, which followed his embarrassing encounter with Mordechai, which occurred on his way home from Esther's feast. It was the night preceding the ...


0

Moshe Rabbeinu could not have jumped in. He was commanded to raise his staff over the sea and stand there so that the Bnei Yisrael would be able to pass through (as we see in Beshalach 14:15 - 16 and 21). We also see that after Bnai Yisrael passed through, then Moshe Rabbeinu was explicitly commanded in pasuk 26 to stretch out his hand again to cause the sea ...


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6:4 shows Haman acting on the advice of 5:14, going to advise the king to hang Mord'chay. Thus, it's relevant to the story to point out that this occurred the very night after 5:14. (My own thoughts.)


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Ibn Ezra, Metzudat David and Abravanel also interpreted this as referring to Mashiach ben Yosef.



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