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11

The "window" was in the top of the Ark. (Ibn Ezra says this explicitly on 6:16, but I think it is generally agreed upon.) Looking up would not have helped much. Sticking his head out of the top would not have been an option, since the opening was 1/6th of a cubit wide (Ibn Ezra there).


10

The Ramban says the reason why his name is not mentioned is due to the fact that the city was small with few people living there, he was not famous. The Shaarei Aharon (from whom I am quoting all these answers) suggests that the names mentioned here are based on the evil nature of the people we are mentioning. Being that the king of Tzoar was not so evil ...


8

The Malbim to Shemos 22, brought here in Sefer HaKarmel, explains as follows: ארר refers to the ramifications of the curse, that it causes a loss or detriment to the person or belongings of the accursed from the cursor. Therefore, curses from Hashem are always ארורים. On the other hand, קלל is just the expression of the curse. Therefore, says the Malbim, ...


7

Rashi says it is "the day of the One". Because the angels weren't created until day two, God was the only sentient being on this day. Obviously this reason doesn't apply from day two onwards, per Rashi's words. Kli Yakar prefers to say that the verse is asserting that one God created both light/day, and dark/evening, as the Sages would take care to mention ...


5

As pointed out by many meforshim, the food in the teivah was provided miraculously. Rabbi Sorotzkin in Oznayim Latorah 6:21 (answer 3) says It is known that the Ark's provisions were insufficient to sustain its passengers for even a week, and only Hashem's blessing caused the food to last the entire year of the flood. Similarly, he says that after they ...


4

As we see farther on, the "clean" animals are the ones designated for the altar. While Noach and the others are allowed to eat any animal, the ones being given to Hashem as a sacrifice are restricted more. See the relevant pesukim and the meforshim on the sacrifice upon exiting the ark. Rabbi Shimshon Rafael Hirsch, for example, goes into a long analysis ...


4

Are there any other places in Tanach where this kind of explicit foreshadowing happens? There are probably a few, but, one memorable one for me is Shmot 16:35 that states that B'nai Yisra'el ate the manna for 40 years until they arrived at the border of Cana'an. Obviously, it hadn't yet happened. As to why such cases occur, in general, this fits into ...


4

For Ch. 6:17 the Torah Sheleimah Vol 2 page 408 note 198 brings the Medrash Raba that VaYigva here means to shrivel. For Ch. 7:21 the Torah Sheleimah Vol 2 page 429 note 79 brings the question and an answer based on the manuscript version of Bava Basra 16b: Only when the Torah uses the terms Geviya and Asifa does it refer to a righteous [painless] death.


4

I remember seeing that rishon, what you are calling an ordinal number, is only in reference to something else, i.e. the day before or the day after, neither of which existed. Therefore echad was used. This is said by the Ramban.


3

Rav Shlomo Kluger in his sefer Imrei Shefer here explains that the posuk in Proverbs 15:27 does not say that "one who does not accept gifts will live", but "one who hates gifts will live", because sometimes it is necessary to accept gifts even though he hates them, for example, to pay off debts which is a mitzvah. Therefore, he continues, Avrohom accepted ...


3

R. Yitzchak Hutner (in Pachad Yitzchak to Sukkos) writes that the reason a "hei" was added was because Avraham was becoming a new creation, so to speak - being fashioned from new. As the Midrash writes, (Midrash Rabba 12:2) when God created the world, He did so with the letter "hei". Whatever that may mean, the letter "hei" is clearly symbolic (and maybe ...


3

I heard in a shiur from R' Moshe Wolfson that Avraham was given his new name in the context of the promise to have children and become a nation. The letter ה is the אות ההולדה, the letter of birth, as it is the feminine letter (the letter that turns a word into a grammatically feminine word). Avraham was being given the ability to father a nation, ...


3

See Rabbi Hirsch chapter 6 vs 17. Seems Hashem only used this term to ease Noach's mind while being left to imagine the impending death of millions.


3

as @Nic said, the orientation of that time (note that the word comes from "east" [orient]) was to face the east as the base direction, unlike our modern maps which face north. This places the Mediterranean at their backs, the Negev (and Chevron) to their right, the Galilee to their left, and the Jordan river straight ahead. The reason that Shomron and ...


3

There is a disagreement in the commentaries whether Cham was the youngest or middle son. If he was the middle son then it is easy to understand why Rashi explained that קטן means worthless and despised since he was not the youngest. In fact, Rashi himself in Avodah Zorah 9a says clearly that Cham was the middle son. The Gur Aryeh however is amongst those ...


3

1st Question: How did Pharaoh know? Ramban: the manner of the affliction made it absolutely clear to Pharaoh that it was a punishment for taking Sarai. He therefore asked Sarai what he did to deserve this, and she told him that she was married to Avraham. There are a few ways that the affliction might have been clearly a punishment for taking Sarai: ...


1

Another one that Rashi actually points out is in Bereishis 2 14 d.h. Kush v'Ashur. As far as why here, I would suggest that it brings out the unbelievable unnatural event of the destruction, much like Eiliyahu watering everything before the heavenly fire struck.


1

The source of Rambam is in Shvuot 35:2, start with the words "כל שלמה האמורין בשה"ש קדש". There are some exception that are brought to this rule. But according to one of the opinions the Shelomoh that you brought refers to God, and division of money is number of people that a King may kill. אמר שמואל מלכותא דקטלא חד משיתא בעלמא לא מיענשא שנאמר כרמי שלי ...


1

Except for the Baby Seal's excellent answer, I remember one more explanation. In Judaism the day starts from the evening. For example, Shabbath starts on Friday evening and finishes on Saturday evening. This rule is learned from this very verse you are talking about. You can interpret "one day" as "the same day", meaning that evening and morning belongs to ...


1

According to the Ramchal, this special status isn't for just keeping the Torah. It is a result of purifying the physicality of the body. Also, Moshe did achieve this status in some form, although I don't know if it is lower or higher than what Eliyahu achieved. Daas Tevunos siman 70 כי אין סוף הכונה בביאת הנשמה בגוף, לשתחיה אותו בחיי ההבל האלה, אבל ...



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