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Rav Hirsch states that Moshe is to take the mateh in order to show that he is acting as the messenger of Hashem. However, hitting the rock with the mateh would imply that this is a special intervention from Hashem as a result of the uproar. Moshe is to take the staff "show them that you are still my messenger", but speak to the rock to show that it was ...


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Kol Dodi on the Haftaros, by Rabbi David Feinstein. According to the publisher: In this masterpiece, the Rosh Yeshivah introduces each Haftarah, explains its historical context where necessary, shows its relationship to the Parashah, and offers an enlightening commentary in his own unique, original manner.


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I have never heard of a name that refers specifically to the category of "maftir readings that are not from the weekly sedra," and I do not believe that such a name exists. In my experience, such a reading is usually just referred to as a "special maftir reading" (as you mentioned in your comment). Addendum I will try to clarify some of the confusion ...


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I think the Hertz Chumash does a good job. Keep in mind, though, that not every Haftarah has a direct relationship to the Torah parsha or even a special occasion occurring on that day. For example, the 7 Haftarat of "Consolation" that occur between the week after Tish'a B'Av (Shabbat Nachamu) and prior to Rosh Hashanna (Netzavim or Netzavim / Vayelech) are ...


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Your question seems to be premised on the idea that the same Torah section ("parasha") is read on or about the same calendar date each year. This is not completely correct: rather, the sections are read in order, to a large extent irrespective of calendar date. (Not completely irrespective, but that's beyond our scope.) Now, there are more Saturdays in a ...


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During 12 month years the following parshas are normally "doubled up". Vayahkel and Pekudei (exception when Rosh Hashanah was a Thursday and the year is full so Pesach will fall on a Sunday). Tazria and Metzora Acharei Mot and Kedoshim Behar and Bechukotai (except in Israel when first day of Pesach was Shabbat like it was this year. As in Israel the 8th ...


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The Samson Raphael Hirsch chumash set has a volume dedicated to the haftorah, many times explaining the connecting theme. In Hebrew, there is Rabbi Shimon Schwab's commentary on the chmash Maayan Beis Hasho'eva which will at times focus on the haftorah independently. Meshech Chochma, also Hebrew, will at times have insights into the haftorah as well.


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My favorite is the commentary of R' Samson Raphael Hirsch on the haphtaros, he often connects the two. In addition, the classic Stone Chumash from ArtScroll has a note on every haphtorah, often explaining the non-obvious connections.



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