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9

In Beraishis 41 (45) Osnat is mentioned as the daughter of Potifera. Rashi comments there on the change of name. He says: Poti-phera: He is Potiphar, but he was called Poti-phera because he became emasculated since he desired Joseph for homosexual relations. — [from Sotah 13b]. So we see that he was not emasculated until he desired Joseph.


9

According the Chida, who says it in the name of the Rokeach (Brought in Vedibarta Bam): According to an opinion in the Gemara (Gittin 43a), when one sells a Jew as a slave to a non-Jew, he is fined to redeem him for up to 100 times his value. In the Torah we find a slave to be valued at 30 silver pieces (Shemot 21:32). Since Yosef was sold as a slave to ...


8

The Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l has a different take on it. In his talk of Shabbos Parshas Vayeishev 5734 (Sichos Kodesh 5734 1:201-202), he explains that Yosef told over these dreams precisely because he hoped to use them to defuse his brothers' jealousy toward him. Previous dreams recorded in the Torah were basically meant to be taken at face value. For ...


8

Levush (Orach Chaim 669) says that it is because its first verse condemns the Jewish people על מכרם בכסף צדיק - for selling the righteous for money. This ties in, then, with the brothers' sale of Yosef (even though the simple meaning of the verse is referring to the kingdom of Yisrael some 900 years later). Indeed, the next phrase, ואביון בעבור נעלים, "and ...


7

It would seem that at the time of Yosef's employment Potiphor was NOT a eunich based on the pasuk and Rashi Breshit Chapter 39 Pasuk 19 :וַיְהִי כִשְׁמֹעַ אֲדֹנָיו אֶת דִּבְרֵי אִשְׁתּוֹ אֲשֶׁר דִּבְּרָה אֵלָיו לֵאמֹר כַּדְּבָרִים הָאֵלֶּה עָשָׂה לִי עַבְדֶּךָ וַיִּחַר אַפּוֹ Now it came about when his master heard his wife's report that she spoke to him, ...


6

The Maharsha to Megilla 16b asks this question and explains that after the 14 years that Yaakov spent in the Yeshiva of Shem and Ever before he came to Charan Esav calmed down and Rivka sent Devorah to call Yaakov back. Since he did not return for 22 years he was punished. The Ben Yehoyada (Ben Ish Chai) writes (Megila 17a): His sin was that he remained for ...


6

The Sedor Hadoros (2217) brings several opinions: The Sefer Hayashar (Parshas Vayeshev) and Seder Olam both maintain he was only in Potifar's house for a year, and spent the next twelve years on prison. The Yefeh Toar (on Midrash Rabba Parshas Behaloshcha and Vayera) questions this, and the Tzemach Dovid suggests he worked for Potifar for 11 years, and spent ...


6

Read this Shi'ur by Menachem Leibtag. http://www.tanach.org/breishit/vayesh/vayeshs1.htm Here's a teaser for it: "After throwing your brother into a pit to die, would you be able to sit down to eat? Yosef's brothers did, as the Torah tells us! However, the Torah does not tell us if they sat near the pit, listening to Yosef's screaming and pleading, or if ...


6

The Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l mentioned this idea in one of his talks (Shabbos Chanukah 5734 - Sichos Kodesh 5734 1:211-212, adapted into English by others). He also adds that it wasn't just that Yosef noticed that they were upset - they probably were on all the other days too, having been demoted and thrown into jail - but that they were upset more than usual, ...


6

According to Abarbanel, at that time and in that area, it must have been customary for the father to give the name to the first child and then alternate with the mother for future children. Here then, Yehuda names Er, his wife Shua names Onan, then Yehuda should have named the third child, except that he was absent during the birth ("וְהָיָה בִכְזִיב ...


6

פרקי דרבי אליעזר לז See here: http://he.wikisource.org/wiki/%D7%A4%D7%A8%D7%A7%D7%99_%D7%93%D7%A8%D7%91%D7%99_%D7%90%D7%9C%D7%99%D7%A2%D7%96%D7%A8_%D7%A4%D7%A8%D7%A7_%D7%9C%D7%97 And a slightly different version cited by R' Kasher: http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=51482&st=&pgnum=168


5

See summary on TorahMusings.com. Partially quote below. ...Ramban and Sforno hold that the Ishmaelites and Midianites were working together. The brothers sold Yosef to them, and they sold him to Potiphar in Egypt. Ibn Ezra says that the Ishmaelites and Midianites were the same people... Rashbam, [et.al] say that the brothers didn’t sell Yosef. ...


5

According to Seder Hadoros (Year 2217) Er and Onan were seven or eight years old when they married Tamar. I'd assume they died quite soon after. However see Ibn Ezra to Breishis 38:1 who states that it was not possible to procreate until age twelve. He reconciles the 22 years by explaining that "At that time" could mean before the sale of Yosef. (Thanks ...


5

No source right now, but I remember learning that the dreams were a prophecy. And a prophet is obligated to tell over his prophecy. If not, he is liable to die by the hands of Heaven (See Rambam Hilchot Yesodei HaTorah 9:3).


5

If the verse omitted either one of the two actions (to rise and to remaining standing upright) we would not get the full picture of the dream Yosef is describing. If the verse omitted "rose up," one might think the sheaf was already standing and that it could have been placed in that position by human agency. Therefore, the verse tells us that it "rose up" ...


5

An idea that was sparked by a similar line of reasoning in this post from the Parsha Blog: Yosef was sold 182 years after Yishmael was born. (That's 14 until Yitzchak is born, 60 more until Yaakov is born, and Yaakov is 130 when he stands before Par'oh after 22 years of Yosef being away = 182 years.) Just because Yitzchak and Yaakov waited a long time to ...


5

See Onkelos who translates the word kohen as rabba. Thus, governor, as you write. וִיהַב לֵיהּ יָת אָסְנַת בַּת פּוֹטִי פֶרַע רַבָּא דְּאוֹן Jastrow gives the meaning of kohen as officer, especially priest. See also II Shmuel 20:23: וְגַם, עִירָא הַיָּאִרִי, הָיָה כֹהֵן, לְדָוִד. and Ira also the Jairite was chief minister unto David. Even so, the ...


4

The three oldest sources that I can find on this question are Shemot Rabbah 7:1, Pirqei deRebi Eliezer 39 and Seder Olam Rabbah 2. They read as follows: הדא הוא דכתיב בכל עצב יהיה מותר ודבר שפתיים אך למחסור. בכל הדברים שאדם נושא ונותן בהם דברי תורה הוא נוטל עליהן שכר יכול אף בדברי בטלה כן תלמוד לומר ודבר שפתיים אך למחסור. אתה מוצא לא היה יוסף ראוי ...


4

The Shalo Hakadosh (Parshas Vayeshiev) writes that from the words "ויבא יוסף את דיבתם רעה" (Yosef brought evil reports to his father), it seems that Yosef did not fabricate these stories (otherwise it should have said he "made up" the reports). The Midrash relates that Yosef would tell his father that his brothers were guilty of eating meat that was not ...


4

The Lubavitcher Rebbe (Toras Menachem vol. 31 page 184) explains this statement of the Zohar at length based on his father's commentary (Rabbi Levi Yitzchok Shnuerson - Likkutey Levi Yitzchok, Haaros Lesefer HaZohar Shmos-Devorim pg. 46). What comes out of the discussion is that there is one level of Tzadik attained simply by virtue of having a bris ("ועמך ...


4

Rabbi Shlomo Kluger explains that the gemara in Berachos teaches that the joy which is experienced as a result of having a good dream can suffice to act as its fulfilment, so that it will no longer actually come to pass. This is why Yosef related the dream to his brothers even though he knew that they would hate him for it, because if he did not tell them ...


3

Will have to look for a source for this, but: The Gemara (Berachos 55a) states that "a dream that has not been interpreted is like a letter that was not opened" (i.e., nothing is going to come from it). Further, it also states (ibid. 55b and 56a) that "all dreams follow the mouth" - i.e., that however a dream is interpreted, that is what it symbolizes, and ...


3

In Peninim on the Torah, eighth series, by Rabbi Aryeh Leib Scheinbaum (2002, ISBN 0-9635120-0-5), the author comments on 40:7 as follows (in part): Yosef's sensitivity catalyzed circumstances that changed his entire life and the history of Klal Yisrael.[...] He noticed — he cared — he took action. First and foremost, however, he noticed. This caring for ...


3

The Gemarah in Yevamot 55b says that all ביאה works even it is done שלא כדרכה. (Tosafot on 20a s.v. יבא say that the reason is that the people having ביאה need to be able to impregnate/be impregnated, not that the act of ביאה needs to be able to impregnate.) The one exception is a שפחה חרופה, as that needs שכבת זרע to be חייב (learned out on Yevamot 55a/b). ...


3

Netziv says that Yosef felt he had to make the second dream happen, so when he first appeared in the royal chariot, Yaakov assumed it was Pharaoh and bowed down. (Yes I know it's weird.) A very different angle is one suggested by Rabbi Yitzchak Etshalom, that all the characters here misunderstood the dream. It wasn't about Yosef himself; it's that the ...


3

In footnote 5 of "What's in a Name" chapter 1 (footnotes unavailable in the online version), R. Wilhelm goes into great length bringing sources for the custom of the father naming the first child, the mother the second child, the father the 3rd child, etc. (later in the chapter he brings many sources for the opposite opinion). He says that there may be a ...


3

Let's put aside all the midrashim for a moment. Pharaoh's officers are described as "sarisim." Ramban says that in fact, we don't know whether that always means "eunuch", or that because so many kings' officers were eunuchs in Biblical times that the Torah uses that word generically for a king's officers.


2

The sefer אוצר השמות חלק ח here in his discussion of the name Potiphera says that there is a dispute amongst the Rabbis whether Potiphar and Potiphera are the same person or not. According to the opinion that they are the same person, he explains that there is no contradiction between the two titles that the Torah gives him, because it was normal in ...


2

The Malbim explains that the difference between עמד and יצב is that עמד just means the position of standing, as opposed to sitting or walking etc. whereas יצב is where you are actively standing, i.e. standing intentionally and against adversary. One could be standing because they were standing a moment ago and nothing has changed, or could be standing ...


2

The sefer Arvei Nachal here on this parsha explains that a rise to power and wealth can sometimes lead to a person becoming arrogant and thus neglect his observance of Torah and mitzvos, and so the rise in fortune can be the cause of a person's downfall. But if Hashem makes a person powerful or wealthy as a reward for a mitzvah that he has done, then he can ...



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