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9

“Mikdash” is a more generic term for a “holy place” or (following Rav S. R. Hirsch) a “sorce of holiness”. The Mishkan was the specific Mikdash built in the desert. (Note the same root SH-K-N in mishkan and v’shakhanti.) For your second question, God is not promising merely to dwell in the tent built for Him but to be an active Presence within the nation: ...


7

The Gemara (Eruvin 2A-3B) actually uses this verse to prove that a Mikdash is sometimes called a Mishkan. (Actually, that Gemara actually says that "Mikdash" and "Mishkan" are interchangeable terms). The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains that according to Rashi (the simple explanation of the text), one cannot say that "Veshanchanti Besocham" is a result of ...


7

Asked and answered here. it seems quite likely that this is a later interpolation; it doesn't appear in early prints of Rashi. In several places, though, Rashi refers to לשון כנען, which was a popular term at the time for the Slavic languages (based on the equation of "Slav" with "slave" and the association of the latter with Canaan). These ...


6

Whether the third Beis Hamikdash will be pre-built is in fact the subject of a dispute among the Rishonim. Rashi (Sukkah 41a, ד"ה אי נמי) says that it will come down from Heaven ready-made; on the other hand, Rambam (Hil. Melachim 11:4) lists the building of the Beis Hamikdash as one of the things that Moshiach will accomplish (in fact, that he needs to do ...


5

The book of Exodus ends with "as God's presence was with them, for all their travels." The Ramban explains that they didn't achieve full redemption from Egypt until that point. Now they had a post-Egyptian purpose and identity.


5

The Netziv in his introduction to Sh'mos says that the ultimate purpose is NOT the redemption from Egypt, but the building of the mishkan and subsequent dwelling of the Shekhina. Remember, the exodus itself happens relatively soon in the sefer, while matan torah and the mishkan take up a much larger portion.


5

R. Aryeh Kaplan (who was also a noted physicist) dealt with this precise question in his The Living Torah. On that word, which he translates as "copper," R. Kaplan comments: Or, 'bronze.' The Septuagint thus translates the word as xalkos which can denote copper or bronze, and the MeAm Lo'ez, also, translates it as alambre which is Spanish for copper or ...


4

Well, presumably Rashi had a different version. The question is — and is asked by the Mizrachi and the Minchas Shay — that no extant m'sora agrees with him. They offer no answer.


4

My understanding has always been that argaman refers to Tyrian Purple, or at least a similar reddish-purplish dye, produced from murex shells. The archaeologist Zvi Koren has written about this and has found a fabric at Qumran of murex-dyed wool that he interprets as having been Tyrian purple. With regards to the hair: some scholars have suggested (and I ...


3

Taken from R Aryeh Kaplan's translation of the Torah dark red (Ibn Ezra; Ibn Janach; Pesikta Rabathai 20:3, 86a). Argaman in Hebrew. Others state that it is similar to lake, a purplish red dye extracted from lac (Radak, Sherashim; Rambam on Kelayim 9:1; cf.Yad, Kley HaMikdash 8:13). Although the Septuagint translates argaman as porphura or ...


2

Meor L'Afeila - Rabbeinu Nesanel ben Yeshaya Parshas Teruma says that it is a light red color. וארגמן הוא הצבע האדום הממוזג בצהיבות Mechon HaMikdash also seems to translate it as some sort of red.


2

Even though we do not have this extra 'vav' in our Sifrei Torah, and even though the Minchas Shai who was a contemporary of the Ramban states that he has never seen a Sefer Torah with this extra 'vav', nevertheless, the fact is not only did Rashi have it, but also the Ibn Ezra and the Chizkuni. Therefore, it would be useful to try and understand why the ...


2

The Greek term for Argaman seems to be porphyra, and this color was used to describe a variety of shades. see http://community.middlebury.edu/~harris/Classics/purple.html. (Note his comment on comparing the color to the sea, "eino ke'ein hayam") Argaman was probably used in the same way, referring as much to a hue or iridescence as to a specific color.


1

The Rambam in Hilchos Kli Mikdash 8:13 writes that it was red,the Raavad said it was two or three dyes mixed together . וכל מקום שנאמר בתורה שש או בד הוא הפשתים והוא הבוץ. ותכלת האמורה בכל מקום היא הצמר הצבוע כעצם שמים שהוא פתוך מן הכוחל. הארגמן הוא הצמר. הצבוע אדום. ותולעת השני הוא הצמר הצבוע בתולעת: השגות הראבד הארגמן הוא הצמר. א"א לי נראה ארגמן ארוג ...


1

I've learned that it is crimson red. While some people have quite reddish hair, I do not think natural crimson hair exists.


1

Rav Eliyahu Essas, one of the most respected Russian rabbanim, answers this question on the verse Melachim I 6:7 here (in Russian though). The basic sense is that it is a typo. If one replaces the samech in rusi with mem, and they are very similar in print, one gets rumi or romi - translation to Latin, and indeed the word dolatum means to shape stones and ...


1

Copper is a pure element (Cu). Like gold it is very soft when pure and is really only fit for jewelry and small trinkets. Copper only became useable in the ancient world for weapons and other large solid things when it was turned into a sturdier alloy. An alloy of copper and other elements is called bronze. (Hence the Bronze Age) Brass is a specific alloy of ...


1

If I understand correctly, you are referring to the brichim, the horizontal poles that were slipped through rings on the boards -- and through holes within the boards -- to hold them in place. The math is straightforward: There were 20 boards of 1.5 amos on the north and south, thus requiring the poles to span 30 amos (the top and bottom poles were 2 x 15 ...



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