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Here is a partial answer. Shaarei Zimra says that there are 5 locations total in Tanach with these two combinations. Two you mentioned. 3 - Melachim2 17:13 שֻׁבוּ מִדַּרְכֵיכֶם הָרָעִים 4 - Yechezkel 48:10 וּלְאֵלֶּה תִּהְיֶה תְרוּמַת הַקֹּדֶשׁ 5 - Tzefania 2:15 זֹאת הָעִיר הָעַלִּיזָה Over here he explains why we sing the Gayrshayim first however I do ...


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From The Living Torah by Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan זצ"ל: In Leviticus 11:18, among the non-kosher birds: וְאֶת־הַתִּנְשֶׁ֥מֶת וְאֶת־הַקָּאָ֖ת וְאֶת־הָרָחָֽם׃‏ The swan, the pelican and the magpie. In his footnotes: 11:18 swan. Tinshemeth in Hebrew; kuknos in Greek; cycnus in Latin. Other sources identify it as a bat, chauve-souris in French ...


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Isaac Levy who translated his grandfather's chumash (Rav Shimshon Rafael Hirsch) from German to English deliberately leaves tinshemes (as did his grandfather) in 11:18 untranslated because all birds not named are kosher and the consequences of an error would be too great. He comments that his grandfather had deliberately not translated the name of the bird ...


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The assumption behind this question is that every letter, every word and every verse of the Torah is measured out carefully. Thus, we see that from an extra vav, a halacha may be derived. When, in the discussions often found in the gemara, one Tanna interprets an extra word in one way to prove his point, we must take pains to explain how his disputant, the ...


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There is another approach that can be taken regarding the death of Nadav and Avihu. Rather than seeing it as a punishment it can be regarded as a consequence. The difference is very subtle, but this perspective can give us a possible answer: Rashi brings up Rabbi Ishmael's opinion that they died for having entered the sanctuary intoxicated by wine, but ...


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He didn't Pasken. He did for himself what he knew to be correct. We find in Eiruvin 63 that a learned student may check the Shechita knife for his own usage although it is seen as an honor usually given to the local Rav. The Issur of Paskenning in front of a Rebbi is even by simple Halachos which can be found in a Sefer by anyone. It is obvious that you ...


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"Rav D.Z Hoffman raises the difficulty that all insects have six legs, not four. He explains that they have 4 legs that are used for simple walking, while the other two are used for jumping." (From English Artscroll Chumash) Therefore in the context of the question, the midrash is stating that if they had "5 legs" specifically for walking, (i.e. 7 in total) ...


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There is a difference in meaning between לו , meaning that it (DOES) have (jointed legs) and לא meaning that it does not. So, which is it? The answer that we follow is that it goes according to the kri meaning that it DOES have it. That would make these insects permissible. The reason it is written לא is explained in Chullin 65a: (ויקרא יא, כא) אשר לא ...


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It continues, "up to anything with lots and lots of legs", which Rashi says is a centipede. The point is that all insects are not-kosher, with the rare exceptions of a few types of locust.


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In Devarim they're listed the way you suggested, all in one posuk. Daas Sofrim says (http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=39783&st=&pgnum=169) that in Vayikra they're given each their own posuk to stress the issur because these animals were commonly eaten, and also because each one is on a different level in ruchnius (and Chazal say that ...


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Blockquote I am not an expert in hares and hyraxes but the camel's issue is foot related but the others are cud related. I think the hare has 2 types of poop. One which it re-eats and the final form. Presumably the hyrax does the same thing with barf. We need the other 2 to say that these activities don't count as cud chewing. i'm upvoting your answer ...



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