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Sefer Hadoros & Zemach David says Yehoshua was born in 2406 and the story of the Meraglim was in 2449, making him 43 years old.


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Although we often invoke Midivar Shekker Tirchack as the Torah's command not to lie, it is not really a biblical prohibition. That pasuk is actually discussing beis din and witness. When the Gemara discusses keeping your word in business it invokes another verse, הין צדק איפה צדק. This still does not apply to a lie in conversation. For that we have the ...


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The prime example given by the Talmud of an overriding reason to allow misleading statements is in the interest of maintaining peace (whether marital or otherwise). This would seem to be all the more so a compelling reason when the peace in question is between G-d and the entire Jewish people. See Yevamot 65b: וא"ר אילעא משום רבי אלעזר בר' שמעון: מותר ...


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Kli Yakar (who cites Yalkut Shim'oni on Numbers 13:2:4): ד"א לכך פרט אנשים, לפי שארז"ל (ילקו"ש פנחס תשעגכז) האנשים היו שונאים את הארץ ואמרו נתנה ראש ונשובה מצרימה (במדבר יד.ד) והנשים היו מחבבות הארץ ואמרו תנה לנו אחזה (שם כז.ד) וע"כ אמר הקב"ה לפי דעתי שאני רואה בעתיד היה יותר טוב לשלוח נשים המחבבות את הארץ כי לא יספרו בגנותה, אבל לך לדעתך שאתה ...


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RaSh"I on Numbers 26:64 (thanks to Chabad.org)


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Excellent question! Avot D'Rav Natan ch. 9 Mishna 2 explains why. In summary, he states that that B'nai Yisra'el were tested 10 times (The Mishnah lists all 10) but they weren't punished for any of them except for the incident with the spies, because this was Lashon Hara. At the end of the Mishnah, he states, that this is a kal vachomer we should learn, ...


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Rashi to 14:33 says: לא מת אחד מהם פחות מבן שישים, לכך נגזר ארבעים, כדי שיהיו אותם של בני עשרים מגיעין לכלל ששים. Not one of them died before the age of sixty. This is why forty [years] was decreed, so that those who were twenty years old would reach the age of sixty. Each person died at age 60.


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(I'll respond to the question as it applies to Yom Kippur, as asked. The verse in Numbers is actually talking about a different context, and the same question can be asked there — but wasn't.) According to Maimonides (Yad, T'shuva 1:3–4): T'shuva[1] atones for all sins. Even [if one was] an evildoer all his days and did t'shuva at the end, ...


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At the end of the day, it was a mitzvah from Moshe to the meraglim. Secondly, the fruits' incredible qualities were undeniable. Not bringing them back for klal yisrael to see would prevent the nation from making their own judgments about the land's bounty. At least Calev and yehoshua could make a stronger case with the evidence.


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This comes from the Medrash on Parshas Pinchas, Parsha 21:10. The Medrash says that in that time the women fixed what the men ruined. They weren't part of the Egel and did not subscribe to the idea of the Meraglim. Just like the Egel happened without the women getting in their way, this happened too. What we see is that they lived the land and looked ...


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I shall give my answer here although it may be more appropriate to the question this is following up. The question really should be why is it that the women wanted the land and not the men. This will also answer the question why the women couldnt speak up and influence the men. In a previous answer I wrote the 'yesod' that the reason why the benai yisroel ...


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The original command was that they should turn around and travel back into the midbar. However, in Bamidbar 14:39 - 45 says that after Moshe Rabbinu gave the command, the B'nai Yisrael rebelled and tried to force their way into the land and were massively defeated. As a result of this, Rav Hirsch on Devarim 1:46 says that This "staying quietly" at the ...


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Rabbi Frand points out that they were not originally reshaim. They were righteous men who wound up rationalizing that it would be better for Bnai Yisrael to remain in the desert, living a miraculous life. Once they started rationalizing, they started down a slippery slope that led to their bringing a "bad report". Another point is that they allowed ...


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A couple of things come to mind. One is that they denied G-d's ability to conquer the land (see Rashi 13:31), essentially asserting the supremacy of nature over G-d. So measure for measure G-d would abandon them (see 14:9) to nature in the wilderness, ensuring their death by disease. Another is that they didn't believe they would go into the land, so ...



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