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20

God's further comments in Genesis 17 and 21 clarify that Isaac is the sole descendant who would be the bearer of the covenant. (See, for example, 21:12 and 17:19-21.)


12

Besides the main issue of God's explicit identification of Isaac for this inheritance, already conveyed in DoubleAA's answer, note that Islam is a belief system whose creation came way after the events described in Genesis, and one that doesn't have any special status in Judaism. Therefore, it's impossible that Judaism would consider the subject of verses in ...


9

The commentators have several different approaches here. [Sources are from a shiur my father gives. Text copied either from Sefaria (first two) or his sourcesheet (last two).] Rashi's take (17:17), based on Targum Onkelos, is that Avraham laughed out of joy, while Sarah's laugh was out of disbelief. ויפל אברהם על פניו ויצחק. זה תירגם אנקלוס וחדי, לשון ...


6

Our version of the Ibn Ezra actually does not have him quoting anyone, but rather saying that idea in the name of many. The Rav Kook edition of the Ibn Ezra has second section with a variant text which does find him quoting this in the name of The Nagid. The footnote there says this is indeed a reference to Rabi Shmuel Hanagid, and sends us to the ...


6

Onkelos' Aramaic rendering of this phrase is: ... וְיָת קְיָמִי, אֲקֵים עִם יִצְחָק He translates the first "את" as "יָת," which is the equivalent direct-object word, and the second as "עִם," which means "with." (See Jastrow for confirmation of these understandings of the Aramaic.) So, his translation is consistent with your second option. Ha'amek ...


5

Rashbam on Genesis 18:12:1: עדנה - יתעדן הבשר ויתפשטו הקמטין. Sefaria translation: עדנה, a form of the skin becoming elastic and the wrinkles straightening out. This concept is supported by Radak on Genesis 20:2:1 (Sefaria English translation) excerpt: והענין להפקיר אשתו מבלי לעמד בנסיון הריגת עצמו פרשנו למעלה בדבר שרה עם פרעה. ומן ...


4

He is quoting Rabbi Shmuel Hanagid. Rabbi Shmuel HaNagid, also called just HaNagid, was a major religious and political figure in Spain just after the year 1000 CE.


4

In 17:19, Chabad.org does translate it as "Indeed", however that does not change the context or meaning of the statement. Art Scroll uses "Nonetheless" as the translation which has the same implication as Chabad.org. יט וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים אֲבָל שָׂרָה אִשְׁתְּךָ יֹלֶדֶת לְךָ בֵּן וְקָרָאתָ אֶת שְׁמוֹ יִצְחָק וַהֲקִמֹתִי אֶת בְּרִיתִי אִתּוֹ לִבְרִית ...


4

It is translation #2, confirnming that the word את is used as a direct object marker. I will give you a few verses, so that you can see why this translation makes the most sense: Genesis 17:19-21: וַיֹּ֣אמֶר אֱלֹהִ֗ים אֲבָל֙ שָׂרָ֣ה אִשְׁתְּךָ֗ יֹלֶ֤דֶת לְךָ֙ בֵּ֔ן וְקָרָ֥אתָ אֶת־שְׁמ֖וֹ יִצְחָ֑ק וַהֲקִמֹתִ֨י אֶת־בְּרִיתִ֥י אִתּ֛וֹ לִבְרִ֥ית עוֹלָ֖ם ...


3

Ayin Hara can be considered as the result of one's flaunting ones good fortune. It can also be considered as the result of an individual having is own judgment reconsidered. “Evil eye” is known as “ayin hara” in Judaism. It is a real force, mentioned many times in the Talmud and Kabbalistic works (e.g. Talmud Brachot 20a, 55b). The concept ...


3

What is a malakh? There are a number of opinions, I will discuss one of the most famous, that of the Rambam in the Moreh. I've included the pertinent parts of the extensive discussion of the subject of malakhim in the Moreh, down below. To summarize the Rambam's points, Malakh HASHEM can refer to a variety of entities, forces, thoughts and/or persons who ...


3

they have a temporary merit in Israel as the zohar says (Zohar Shemot 32A) God distanced the children of Ishmael from supernal cleaving and gave them [only] a portion below in the Holy Land on account of their circumcision. And in the future, the children of Ishmael are destined to rule over the Holy Land for a long time when it is empty from ...


2

"After they will leave with a great possession" To what was this referring? The Great Possession was really the Torah! But haShem asked Moshe to tell the B'nei Yisroel to request gold & silver vessels from the Egyptians to ensure that none of the less sophisticated members of the B'nei Yisroel would not underestimate the value of the Torah and ...


2

The baal (author of) Haflaa, in his book Panim Yafos, asked your question, and answered as follows: 12:4 says "וַיֵּלֶךְ אַבְרָם כַּאֲשֶׁר דִּבֶּר אֵלָיו ה׳ / Avram went as God had told him", meaning that he went not for the benefit promised him but merely in order to fulfill God's command. This, the baal Haflaa says, was his test: whether, once he knew ...


2

Consider Rashi, Chizkuni and Rav Hirsch explaining why Parshas Chayei Sarah gives her age as 100 and 20 and 7. The comment in Chayei Sarah is that at 100 she was like 20 and at 20 she was like 7. Thus, when Sarah made her comment, she was speaking of the fact that she was above the age of giving birth even though she was also as beautiful as a 20 year old. ...


2

The cogent explanation comes from Rashi's commentary on the passage; that is, Caleb represented the fourth generation that entered the land. In this regard, the commentary of the Jewish Publication Society provides that four generations in this context therefore means four lifespans. Reference: Sarna, Nahum M. (1989). Genesis. Philadelphia: Jewish ...


2

The basic translation of אבל is 'but'. However, it is also used, as Rashi says, as 'really'. It is the same word and the same literal meaning. The function of 'but' in this context is used to mean 'really'. In the language of Mishna we have the same thing: ברם זכור אותו איש לטוב, but this person should be remembered for good. But, as in, and how. In fact, in ...


2

The Ha'amek Davar is explaining two points: The relevance of "stars"; and The seeming redundancy of this promise in light of the earlier promise in 13:16. He explains that the stars represent luminous individuals, and that in light of this there is no redundancy, because the earlier promise of great numbers referred to the people generally, while this ...


2

The Malbim (commentary to Numbers 22:21) writes that את is used as "with" when two entities are engaged in the same activity but are not equals in that activity. Thus Bilaam was told not to go with - עם - the messengers of Balak (Numbers 22:12), but was told he could go with - את - the messengers of Balak (Numbers 22:20), and was then scolded for going with ...


1

There seem to be two expressions of multitude. One is the comparison to stars. There are very many stars so this is the first expression of multitude. The second is “if thou be able to count them” which is an additional expression of multitude. The second expression cannot have the same meaning as the first expression and thus the Haemek Dovor (as is ...


1

The Ohr HaChaim learns like you do - and more - that this verse is one of the proofs that the Torah is predicting the future. Something to the effect of: "It's perplexing how they are incapable of believing in a great future! It's an explicit verse! Abraham was promised [this large piece of land] - the land belonging to the 10 nations enumerated [after this ...


1

Rav Eliezer Melamed, in his work Pninei Halacha (העם והארץ ג:יד), quoting כפתור ופרח פרק י And הרב אברהם אזולאי (חסד לאברהם מעין ג, נהר ז describes those borders as the borders in which the mitzvah of settling the land applies (not for mitzvot tluyot baaretz). He says the mitzvah to live there, is based on the borders promised to the avos, and that the ...


1

It does not change meanings. A word is used in context. In English for example, we speak of "the South" to mean the southern portion of the eastern United States even though someone may be in Mexico when using the term. Similarly here we speak of the "South" relative to Yerushalayim when speaking about different parts of the country of Yisrael. Thus, the ...


1

Actually, I think it is obvious that there are two different laughters being spoken of. Avraham Avinu heard it from Hashem Himself. Obviously, Avraham is not laughing off Hashem's word. His laughing is because he already envisions it happening, and being so outlandish he laughs about it. Sarah Imanu, on the other hand, heard it now for the first time, from ...


1

The strange grammatical placement of this phrase is due to the Masoretic Text, which contains Hebrew cantillation marks that are both musical and logical. In this regard, the placement of the phrase בֶּן־אֲחִ֥י אַבְרָ֖ם (the son of Avram's brother) ends with the Tifha disjunctive accent, which modifies everything contained by the preceding disjunctive ...


1

The test was in terms of commitment - though he was aware of the reward that would await him, he was not planning on leaving his father behind (who was presumably sick, and therefore stopped his own journey in Charan) [see Rashi at the end of Noach that Terach was still alive when Avram was told to go]. Also, it is clear that he would have to live forever in ...



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