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0

Rash"i that you cited talks only about Cain. Hevel was born another time, that possibly was after the sin (see Tosafot Sanhedrin 38:2) When Chava gave the fruit to Adam she also gave it to the animals. Bereshit 3:6. ותיתן גם לאישה רש"י: גם - לרבות בהמה וחיה Translation: and gave also to her husband Rash"i: "also" - to include animals ...


0

There are times where a shoresh will mean polar opposites. יסף comes to mind where we see it can mean to end or to continue. Rabbi Hirsch points these out many times. It is possible that ערום is used to both mean uncovered as far as clothing goes and also mean covered as far as hiding a sneaky thought process goes.


2

Targum pseudo Jonathan translates עֲרוּמִּים as wise. The verse reads as follows: והוו תרווהון חכימין אדם ואנתתיה ולא אמתינו ביקרהון And they were both wise, Adam and his wife, and they did not remain in their honor. It is possible, though not evident, that what prompted such a translation is juxtaposition to the serpent's being ערום‏.


1

Except for the Baby Seal's excellent answer, I remember one more explanation. In Judaism the day starts from the evening. For example, Shabbath starts on Friday evening and finishes on Saturday evening. This rule is learned from this very verse you are talking about. You can interpret "one day" as "the same day", meaning that evening and morning belongs to ...


5

While you may not be so satisfied with this answer, I do know of a commentary that discusses the juxtaposed phraseology: the Ibn Ezra. However, he says not to make anything of it, and that it's merely a stylistic device: ופירוש ערום חכם שיעשה דבריו בערמה ואל תתמה בעבור היות ערום אחרי ערומים והם שני טעמים. כי באלה הצחות בלשון כמו בלחי החמור חמור חמורתים ...


5

Funny, I asked myself the same thing last year, and eventually found an interesting answer in the Hertz Chumash. Hertz comments that: The same Hebrew root signifies both 'naked' and 'subtle, clever, mischievous'. Seeming simplicity is often the most dangerous weapon of cunning. The gliding stealthy movements of a serpent is a fitting symbol of the ...


0

Breishis And God called the light day, and the darkness He called night, and it was evening and it was morning, one day. ה. וַיִּקְרָא אֱלֹהִים | לָאוֹר יוֹם וְלַחשֶׁךְ קָרָא לָיְלָה וַיְהִי עֶרֶב וַיְהִי בֹקֶר יוֹם אֶחָד: And God called the expanse Heaven, and it was evening, and it was morning, a second day. ...


4

I remember seeing that rishon, what you are calling an ordinal number, is only in reference to something else, i.e. the day before or the day after, neither of which existed. Therefore echad was used. This is said by the Ramban.


7

Rashi says it is "the day of the One". Because the angels weren't created until day two, God was the only sentient being on this day. Obviously this reason doesn't apply from day two onwards, per Rashi's words. Kli Yakar prefers to say that the verse is asserting that one God created both light/day, and dark/evening, as the Sages would take care to mention ...


5

אור is a singular noun meaning "light". מאורות (expanded form) is a plural noun meaning "[things that] give off light". You are correct in noticing that they share the root of אור.


1

According to Rashi's commentary on Genesis, the order of events presented therein is not to be taken literally. He concludes a long comment on 1:1 with: על כרחך לא לימד המקרא סדר המוקדמים והמאוחרים כלום Perforce, you must admit that Scripture did not teach us anything about the sequence of the earlier and the later [acts of creation]. He backs ...


2

It occured to me while reading the Gen 1, that reptiles may be implied by the verses. First check out this answer. The exegetical approach used therein is the one I am attempting to use. Next, note the wording of verse 20, when water life and flying things are introduced: וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים--יִשְׁרְצוּ הַמַּיִם, שֶׁרֶץ נֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה; וְעוֹף יְעוֹפֵף ...



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