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Both approaches are legitimate and have roots in Orthodox litterateur. Usually we refrain from interpreting the Torah as only a metaphor (see Rabad on Hilchot Melachim 12:1 and the Mirkavat Mishne there) , while in some cases we most understand the Torah in a metaphorical way (such as Deut. 10:16 "ומלתם את ערלת לבבכם וערפכם לא תקשו עוד"). However, ...


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Radak on Genesis 3:1: Excerpts below. Other points are in the link. והנחש היה ערום מכל חית ה שדה אשר עשה ה' אלוקים , It is in order to ask in what fashion the serpent conversed with Chavah. If G’d had opened the serpent’s mouth by means of a miracle, as He did when Bileam’s ass started speaking to him (Numbers 22,28), why did the Torah not report, ...


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Rabbi Dr. Menachem Krakowski published an article in Hakira a few years back in which (along the lines of the Moreh Nevukhim) he interprets the entire story as a psychological allegory, including the man (reasoning faculties), the woman (emotional faculties), and the serpent (hedonic sexual/physical faculties).


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The Rambam understands these verses to not be referring to a physical location. In Moreh Nevochim 2:30, the Rambam writes (קאפח translation): וממה שראוי שתדע אמרם ויקח ה' אלקים את האדם עלה אותו ויניחנו בגן עדן הניח אותו לא עשו פסוק זה ללקיחתו ממקום והנחתו במקום אלא הרמת מעלה מציאותו בנמצאים הללו ההוים הנפסדים והנחתו במצב מסויים And it is fitting to ...


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Firmament is a weird word that you basically only see in old bibles in this passage. We understand that there were "waters" and the "firmament" was a separation introduced to make two sections of "water." Your midrash rabbah says that this separating layer became the world but was made from the "waters" I put "waters" in quotation marks because these early ...



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