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9

The Midrash Raba 1:28 says it was justifiable: One time, an Egyptian taskmaster went to a Israelite kapo and looked at his wife, who was beautiful without blemish. He got up at cockcrow and removed him from his house and (the Egyptian) returned and bedded his wife, who thought he was her husband…. Once the taskmaster knew that [the husband] knew ...


6

To first clarify, even though lying is usually frowned upon, I'm pretty sure that, at least ethically speaking, there's no reason to frown upon lying to Pharaoh in this situation if it was necessary to save the Jews. The question being dealt with here is why was this deception necessary - couldn't God have saved them without the lie? Thanks to this shiur, ...


5

The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains that this was actually an answer to Moshe. See an English Essay of it here. Moshe had two arguments why he shouldn't be the redeemer: He didn't want to exalt himself above his older brother He realized he wasn't going to be the final redeemer and therefore thought it was a waste of time for him to take the Jews out of Egypt. ...


5

Gur Aryeh seems to have a very nice explanation. The link is a Google book, so you will find it on p. 34. Paraphrasing: Avraham, Moshe and Mashiach all had an exalted status. They all transcended holiness approaching a Godly level. All 3 people are loftier than time, space and the universe. The donkey is the only non-kosher animal connected with a ...


5

Let's say the average couple has six children in total, when the parents are about 20. Then, after 210 years, the population of 70 will increase to (6/2)^(210/20) * 70 = 7.16 million people. If the children were born when the parents were teenagers, then even five children per couple would lead to millions after 210 years. Thus, there's nothing so ...


4

Rashi explains that moshe asked what the merit of the Jews are that they will be saved from Egypt. Hashem answered that their merit is that they will receive the torah. So this was not intended as a proof.


4

Nechama Leibowitz has an explanation that (IMHO) beautifully combines peshat and midrash. She notes that, leading up to Moshe's prophecy at the bush, there are three progressive stories recorded about him. The first is the story of him seeing an Egyptian oppressing a Hebrew, in which he kills the Egyptian. This demonstrates how strongly he felt about ...


4

Presumably his family told him. In other words, what makes us think it was a secret? The Torah gives us this (paraphrased) timeline: Par'o's daughter finds Moshe, saying "this baby is a Hebrew!" So she knows and is doing nothing close to hiding it. Moshe's sister (who is known to Par'o's daughter) suggests finding a Hebrew nurse for him. The cat remains ...


3

The Beis Yosef Y.D 158, followed by the Rema (Darkei Moshe 158:2) and the Shach (158:2) understand, based on Tosefos to Avoda Zara 26a s.v. ולא מורידים, that when the Mishna says אין מורידים, it means that even though your average gentile violates the 7 Noahide laws, there is no mitzvah to kill them, but there is no prohibition. (In fact, Tosefos there feels ...


3

Ibn Ezra on the second verse you refer to (Exodus 6:3), citing Rav Saadya Gaon, explains that the meaning of this verse is not that the Jews had never heard this name before (in fact, the name had been used with Abraham and Jacob), but rather that the name was not used exclusively. כאילו אמר ובשמי ה' לבדו לא נודעתי להם רק פעם באל שדי ופעם בשם ה'...והנה ...


3

There is argument among the commentaries about exactly what happened. Some say (like Rashi on verse 14) that Moshe killed the Egyptian by saying the sacred name of God. Others (like the Ibn Ezra on verse 12) say that this patently wrong and Moshe hit the Egyptian with a stone. The Ramban on verse 14 walks a middle route saying that Moshe might have ...


3

Rashi's quote from the text is "את-אמתה" so his question must arise from within the quote or from the quote's relationship with the context. He may have been dissatisfied with understanding the quote as 'her handmaiden' because that would raised the following questions: 1) Why does the text specify who was sent? (It was 'only' a maidservant, after all. ...


3

According to רמב"ן (Nachmanides) on that verse (2:1), a discussion of the lineage of Moshe and his parents would prolong the narrative unnecessarily; at this point, the Torah would like to just get on with the story. ויקח את בת לוי ולא הזכיר הכתוב שם האיש ולא שם אשתו אשר לקח, והיה זה בעבור כי יצטרך ליחסם ולהזכיר שמם מי אביהם ואבי אביהם עד אל לוי, ...


3

Four possible ways for Moshe to have known he was Jewish: His mother/family told him. The daughter of Pharaoh told him. He found out by supernatural means. It was just known, generally. (@WAF's answer covers the last possibility, as well as the first in more detail; I mention them here only for completeness, and am answering separately to add the middle ...


2

Rashi to Shemot 1:7 writes: וישרצו: שהיו יולדות ששה בכרס אחד and swarmed: They bore six children at each birth. ( Chabad text and translation ) שפתי חכמים on that Rashi (citing שמות רבה) explains that this is learned from the fact that there are six different, apparently extraneous wordings that describe the growth of the Jewish people in Egypt. ...


2

According to the medrash rabba 1 28 the man getting beaten was in fact Dassan the husband of the woman who was tricked. The Radal there #41 wants to amend the text to say she was the sister of Dassan, but either way, he had personal knowledge of what transpired, and turned around and slandered Moshe, the man who saved him, or his relative. See there also ...


2

R' Hirsch understands the אות to be referring back to the previous point - Moshe said (vs. 11) "Who am I that I should ... bring the Children of Israel out from Egypt?" Hashem answered, This that you have asked "Who am I..." is exactly the qualification to be the best messenger. You sense that you lack any qualification for this mission, and that itself ...


1

Chassam Soffer in Toras Moshe addresses the discrepancies of the lack of the clothing and the word vayinatzilu. He points to Rashi in Vayishlach 35 2 where the clothing we suspect of being from avoda zara. As such, Hashem couldn't command the Bnei Yisroel to take clothing that had pictures of avoda zara. This would also preclude emptying out all their gold ...


1

Hat tip to Gershon Gold for this answer. As per the link he posted the Sefer Nitzutzei Oros says that Balak was actually Yisro who did not remain a Jew. The Torah did not directly reveal this however named him Ben Tzipor to show he changed his mind like a bird that jumps around. Now if Ben Tzipor is the father of Tziporah perhaps there is your connection.


1

The Ohr HaChaim (end of commentary to verse 15) writes that Moshe was supposed to first tell them "I AM sent me" and then tell them "G-d, G-d of your fathers, Avraham, Yitzhak and Ya'akov sent me." He gives several explanations for what was being communicated with the name "I AM," but whatever the idea of "I AM" is meant to be, it was an unknown name to the ...


1

Was Moshe decieving Pharoh, or was the original “Exodus” from Egypt meant to be temporary? Exodus 3:18 And they shall hearken to thy voice: and thou shalt come, thou and the elders of Israel, unto the king of Egypt, and ye shall say unto him, The LORD G-d of the Hebrews hath met with us: and now let us go, we beseech thee, three days' journey into ...


1

You may need to glean some insight to the connection from Ramban's explanation on Shmot 3:11. It's lengthy, but an important part of what he states is that regarding B'nai Yisra'el and Moses leadership, there was a sequence and cause / effect. Ramba"n states that B'nai Yisra'el would listen to Moses about the concept of being freed from Pharoah and slavery. ...



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