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8

The Zohar (Bamidbar 138a and 187b) points out that this repetition is further unique in that the two "Moshe"s are not separated by a pesik (vertical line), unlike other repeated names in Tanach ["Avraham | Avraham" (Gen. 22:11), "Yaakov | Yaakov" (ibid. 46:2), "Shmuel | Shmuel" (I Sam. 3:10)]. This, says the Zohar, was because Moshe was perfect from birth ...


7

The Ramban writes that even though the same word is being used they have two different meanings. In the first posuk it means "burning", and in the second posuk it means "burned up and consumed". And he points out that the Targum Onkelos also translates the words differently - בער (burning) and מתוקד (burned up).


6

According to the simple meaning of the verses, there must have been at least three: the one whom Yosef served as vizier, the one who started the oppression ("a new king arose," Ex. 1:8) and who died (ibid. 2:23), and the one whom Moshe confronted. However, we find opinions in the Gemara and Midrash (cited in Rashi to both of these verses) that take these ...


5

It was made out of Sapphire and had the words דצ"ך עד"ש באח"ב , (an acronym of the Ten Plagues) inscribed on it. See Pirkei Avos chapter 5:6 with its commentaries.There are also midrashim on this topic. From Pirkei D'Reb Eliezer 40 ר' לוי אומ' אותו המטה שנברא בין השמשות נמסר לאדם הראשון מגן עדן ואדם מסרו לחנוך וחנוך מסרו לנח ונח לשם ושם מסרו לאברהם ...


5

On Deut. 21:14, where we have the same ...והיה אם... ו formulation (about the husband of the yefas toar hating her and sending her away), Rashi comments (from Sifri) that "the verse is predicting that you will end up hating her." So in that case, at least, the "it will be" refers to both the אם clause and its outcome. (If the אם clause was parenthetical - ...


4

Tol'dos Yotzchak (by Rabbi Yitzchak Karo, uncle of the Bes Yosef), in his commentary to 4:10, says that "כבד לשון" refers to an impediment in pronouncing the so-called tongue letters, דטלנת;‎ "ערל שפתים", the lip letters, בומף; and "כבד פה", the rest. ["לא איש דברים", then, would seem to be an all-embracing expression.]


4

No source, but something I thought of when we learned the portion this year. It was because Datan and Aviram publicized it that Pharaoh needed to take action. Once word got out that a public servant had been murdered while/for doing his job, there would have been a call for justice from the rest of Pharaoh's court. Pharaoh gave into the public pressure and ...


4

Exodus Rabbah 1:26 brings this midrash: one day when Moshe was a child he grabbed Paro's crown and the court magicians counselled Paro to have him killed lest he usurp the throne. Ultimately a test was proposed and Moshe passed (with Gavriel's help), so he was allowed to live. But it's not unreasonable to think that the magicians would continue to caution ...


4

Moshe repeats that he has a speech impediment in Shemos 6,12 because it is part of his argument to Hashem that Pharaoh would not hearken to him, as it says: "And Moshe spoke before Hashem, saying: Behold, Yisrael did not hearken to me, how then will Pharaoh hearken to me, seeing that I am of closed lips?". The sefer Binyan Ariel explains Moshe's argument ...


3

Seder Olam Rabba (written by Rabbi Yose Ben Chalafta in the 2nd century) chapter 3 says that they took 12 months - based on the starting point of your discussion, namely the gathering of the straw, which he writes is normal to do in Iyar (not in the fall). The Mishna in Eduyos 2:10 says the same: משפט המצריים, שנים עשר חודש The judgement of the ...


3

Based on the the Sefer Zikaron (I didn't look it up) and the Sefer HaShoreshim LeHaRadak (entry אֲמָה), the Chumash Shai LeMorah says that there are some who say the correct version is with a dagesh in the mem. (He says that R' Sadeya Gaon says so, and R' Hai Gaon brings both versions.) If that is the case, it seems that Rashi brings the Midrash in order to ...


3

Rashi's modus operandi is NOT just to bring peshat. The quote is to bring peshat, and to bring aggadah which works well and explains aspects of the text. Rashi to Bereishit 3:8: ואני לא באתי אלא לפשוטו של מקרא ולאגדה המיישבת דברי המקרא דבר דבור על אופניו I would estimate that about 80% of Rashi is citations of midrashim. In this instance, Rashi's ...


3

From here: The Holy One tested Moshe by means of the flock, as our sages have explained: when Moshe was tending Yitro's flock out in the desert, a lamb ran off, and Moshe followed it, until it found shelter under a rock. There it found water and stopped to drink. When Moshe approached the lamb, he said: "I did not know that you ran away because you were ...


3

If you're assuming no astrology, magic, or other forms of mysticism, then one should look at political / sociological reasonings, with a historical context. Pharoah is known to relieve his advisors, if and when he believes they are of no use to him (often "relieving" them of their heads - see e.g. the story of Yosef...) Naturally, his advisors are ...


3

According to Ibn Kaspi, "לא איש דברים" means that Moshe was not an eloquent speaker, he was literally not a man of words. This was relevant because God was asking him to be a leader, and good public speaking skills are often thought of as crucial to such a role. No one would ever get elected president or prime minster if they couldn't deliver a good speech. ...


2

Well, it turns out that if I had been reading the verse in a Chumash rather than a Haggada, my confusion would have been cut short. Rashi (quoting from Gemara Sotah) to that verse clears up the problem very handily: and depart from the land: against our will. Our Rabbis, however, interpreted [i. e., depicted Pharaoh] as a person who curses himself but ...


2

My take is this: Narrator: G-d said further to Moses: G-d said: … Go gather the elders of Israel and tell them: G-d tells Moses to say: G-d, the god of your fathers, appeared to me… saying: Moses is told to say G-d said: I paid attention to you and to what was done to you in Egypt. And I (G-d) have said: Moses is told to say G-d said that "G-d of the ...


2

Assuming the “astrologers” had no real power of prediction, we must understand what their plan was. What cause the astrologers to make up such a declaration? Perhaps there are two possible explanations to the astrologers plan. One approach is to suggest that the astrologers were working together with Pharaoh to come up with a plan to undermine Bnei Yisroel. ...


2

Moses was dressed as an Egyptian because until he fled he was an Egyptian prince! Though the purpose of the pasuk (and midrash) stressing his Egyptian identity is indeed a complex one. The text wavers back and forth whether Moshe's identity was primarily Israelite or Egyptian. The Mechilta does not mention clothing: "Did not Israel possess four mitzvot ...


1

Rabbi Shlomo Kluger in his sefer Imrei Shefer here gives a very different explanation of this posuk which includes explaining the last phrase literally - that the Yisrael will leave the land. The full English translation of this piece can be found here, but I will quote a section of it: It seems that all that Pharaoh wanted was to get rid of ...


1

[A friend of mine suggested this answer to me and it seems right: (no source though)] The dialogue in Shemot 4:10-15 deals with Moshe's apprehension in speaking with the Jewish people. Similarly Hashem tells Moshe in Passuk 16 that Aharon will be his interpreter- to the Jewish people. Shemot 4:16: And he will speak for you to the people, and it will be ...


1

On a clinical level, it almost sounds like apraxia of speech. http://www.apraxia-kids.org/site/apps/nlnet/content.aspx?c=chKMI0PIIsE&b=839037&ct=837215 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNB0ihI2srQ



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