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Chicago Community Kollel - Parsha Encounters 4 Shevat 5768 in the name of Rabbi Yisrael Belsky Shlita, says that one may flip a coin to make a decision. When one flips a coin and makes a decision based on the results, he does not feel his decision is necessarily the right thing to do. Rather, he was undecided, and he is leaving his decision up to ...


9

It is a prohibition not to stand by as another Jew is in any kind of danger, be it physical or financial. ALL of the Monei Hamitzvos include it. See Behag 93, Saadia Gaon 61, Rambam 297, Semag 165, Ramban 293, Chinuch 237, Semak 79, etc.


2

Although the term רעך (your fellow/neighbor, friend) is generally understood as applying strictly to one's fellow Jew, R' David Sears brings a number of sources related to loving every one, including one which see a broader application of this verse in his book Compassion for Humanity in the Jewish Tradition: Love for one's neighbor means that we should ...


1

Abarbanel asks this exact question ("אין ספק שבא הפסוק הזה שלא במקומו"), and appears to answer that the reason is because a practitioner of these magics does not belong among the nation of Hashem ("ואין ראוי שישב בתוך עם ה"). It's possible to understand this as saying that the reason the verse is outside the rest of the chapter is to emphasize the degree ...


1

To my mind, it sums up an important idea -- that with all of the things that we have been taught to be forbidden in the quest for holiness, we might be tempted to justify them by attaching them to seemingly appropriate behavior. The final pasuk teaches that even if you try to justify improper behavior, it is still improper. What I wrote years ago follows: ...


1

These quotes deal with separate issues: touching a menstruating woman or laying down next to her makes one ritually impure. Having intercourse, whether standard or "back door" is punishable by being cut off from the people, but not death. Physical contact which is not standard or "back door" intercourse does not carry the penalty of being cut off - it ...


1

The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains (Sichos Kodesh 5744 Parshas Kedoshim - although I think it was edited and printed in Lukutei Sichos somewhere) the reason that Rashi doesn't interpret the verse literally is that the literal understanding is already forbidden by the issur of וכי יפתח איש בור which shows that it is ossur to be a mazik, so here it would be ...


1

While the rules were written in the way that they were for a reason, that reason doesn't necessarily mean that people actually placed stumbling blocks before the blind, that could just be a concise and precise way for the Torah to express the idea of misleading someone. (I wrote about that here and here.) The reason for these kinds of phrases may be to ...



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