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6

As per this answer and this answer, this idea was put forth by Rabbi Ben-Zion Firrer in an article in the 5730 issue of No'am. A copy of the article is available here; a discussion of the opinion, including Rabbi M. M. Kasher's opposition, can be found here (Contemporary Halakhic Problems, R' J. David Bleich, vol 1, p211-212).


3

In the linked article, Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan sources and discusses opinions on both sides of the argument, bringing various proofs and questions. Chasdai Crescas says aliens can exist, Yosef Albo said there cannot be any other beings with free will, apparently the only objection with believing in aliens centers around this issue of free will. Rabbi Kaplan also ...


2

Rav Menashe Klien was asked if one can say kiddush levana on the moon if they are physically on the moon. He answers in his Mishne Halachos 6:259 that there is no difference standing on the moon or earth with regards to saying kiddush levanah. He then writes that going to the moon altogether should be prohibited for two reasons 1) the travel to the moon is ...


2

Even according to those that allow it, (assuming there are those who prohibit space travel,) the halachos of zmanei tefilah, shabbos and all zman related halachos get very complicated. So I assume also they would strongly discourage space travel, whereas flying on a plane doesn't nearly have the same issues (usually at most one or two tefilos). For the same ...


2

R' Menachem Kasher, in האדם על הירח, proposes that ומלאו את הארץ וכבשוה, "fill the land and conquer it," may be an inference to prohibit space travel. He also points to the danger involved.


1

Astrology is listed as part of prohibition #335 in the list of mitzvot here: Not to practice onein (observing times or seasons as favorable or unfavorable, using astrology) (Lev. 19:26) (CCN166). However, some sources including the Ein Yaakov disagree that astrology falls under the prohibition of me'onein; see here.


1

This is not primarily a question of Jewish belief or practice. It is essentially a scientific question. And, because halakha expects man to be in touch with reality, I believe that a Jew may not believe in astrology. We have known for several centuries that the stars and planets have no influence over human affairs. Pre-modern halakhic sources on this ...


1

I'm not aware of any references in the Chumash itself, but the only two passages in the entire Tana'kh that may be relevant to your question, to my knowledge, are (JPS): Yeshayahu 40:22 "It is He that sitteth above the circle of the earth." (Rashi links this verse to 44:13, which speaks of a carpenter using a "compass") Iyov 26:7 "He stretcheth out the ...



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