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I would like to supplement the important answers which proceeded me: The "Oral Torah" is mentioned "explicitly" in the sense that [according to our tradition] it is the subject being directly referred to in places such as the verse cited in DanF's answer. On the other hand, the "concept" or "doctrine" of Oral Torah is not stated explicitly in the same ...


5

According to the introduction to Rambam's Mishnah Torah the Torah does mention the Oral law in the verse Shmot (Ex) 24:12. My loose translation: "... I shall give you the stone tablets, the Torah and the mitzvah that I have written to teach them". Ramba"m explains that the word "Torah" means the written law, and the word "mitzvah" means the Oral Law. Yes, ...


9

There are a few hints to the Oral Torah in the Chumash, but nothing explicit. One of these is found in Devarim 12:21: וְזָבַחְתָּ מִבְּקָרְךָ וּמִצֹּאנְךָ אֲשֶׁר נָתַן יְהֹוָה לְךָ כַּאֲשֶׁר צִוִּיתִךָ you may slaughter of your cattle and of your sheep, which the Lord has given you, as I have commanded you The problem is that we don't find ...


1

Read the first 4 paragraphs toRambam's Mishneh Torah. It cites an important verse as the proof that the Torah shebichtav (written) and B'al Peh (Oral) were both given on Mt. Sinai and were both taught by Moses. The remaining paragraphs go through various generations until he explains how the Oral law became written in the form of the Mishnah. Rather than my ...


8

In order for the Torah Shebal Peh to be "added" to the Torah it would be necessary to conclude from independent evidence that it wasn't part of the Torah to begin with. To argue that Torah Shebal Peh is not divine because it was "added" is to either argue in a circle or merely beg the question. The verse does not proscribe adding to the "written" Torah but ...



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