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On a simplistic level, Chochmah is Wisdom. It is an ability or attribute of a person. Bina is Understanding. It is the use of Chochmah to understand something. Daas is Knowledge. It is the acquired idea that one has understood with Chochmah through Binah. But this isn't Hebrew.SE! You want a Jewish Theology answer, else you wouldn't have used the term ...


7

Rashi explains the difference as follows (Shemos 31:3): וָאֲמַלֵּא אֹתוֹ רוּחַ אֱלֹהִים בְּחָכְמָה וּבִתְבוּנָה וּבְדַעַת וּבְכָל מְלָאכָה - And I have imbued him with the spirit of G-d, with wisdom, with insight, with knowledge, and with [talent for] all manner of craftsmanship with wisdom: [I.e.,] what a person hears from others and learns. ...


7

Various reasons are given for saying Bameh Madlikin. One is to remind people of the things that need to be done before Shabbos (including the proper wicks and oils to use); however, this is not relevant where people pray Maariv after dark anyway, as is generally the chassidic custom, and they therefore omitted it. (Aruch Hashulchan 270:2; R' Avraham Chaim ...


6

I CMLOR many years ago on the predicament I found myself in davening mincha and ma'ariv in the same two places every day. The former was nusach Ashkenaz and the latter nusach S'farad. The result was that the tzibur around me was effectively saying it only once a day. He said tersely and with a shrug, "it's just a perek of T'hilim." Although there is an ...


5

Nusach Sfard (not to be confused with Nusach Sefaradit Or Edot HaMizrach) is the nusach (that contains many Kabbalistic inyanim) used by families and communities who ancestrally were influenced by the teachings of the Ba'al Shem Tov (founder of the Chassidus movement) and his many students. Nusach Sfard is primarily used by (Ashkenazi) people who originate ...


5

I want to correct and some things that appear in Alex's response above. 1) Saying/learning Bameh madlikin at the beginning of Shabbos is a minhag kadmon, an ancient minhog. That means very old, I don't know exactly, but I could see it being over one thousand years old, and maybe even a good deal longer than that. As stated above Sepharadim say it as well as ...


4

Sephardi siddurim vary somewhat based upon the traditions they follow. For example, De Sola Pool's siddur is used in Spanish-Portuguese synagogues, while Moroccans while often use Siddur Darkei Avot. Some obvious variants include the texts of Havdalah. You can read more about these (and other) variants relevant section of Keter Shem Tob by Shem Tov Gaguine. ...


4

The Koren Sacks Siddur is Nusach Sepharad, that is to say, the "Spanish-Portuguese" rite. Nusach Sefard is a variant similar to Ari which bears more similarity to Edot HaMizrach and Ashkenaz to Sepharad. The main differentiating point between Sepharad and Sefard is in Kabbalat Shabbat; in Sepharad, Bameh Madlikin is said, whereas in Sefard, and by extension ...


3

If you look at particular phrases (such as in the section between borchu and shma), and compare the vowels and punctuation, you will find differences in a variety of Ashkenazic siddurim. These differences (such as "b'safah vrurah uvin'imah, kedusha kulam k'echad onim" vs. "b'safah vrurah, uvin'ima kedosha, kulam k'echad onim") reflect slightly different ...


3

Not on a daily basis, but maybe on a weekly basis if you put a different tallit katan on for Shabbos. Also, summer's coming up and if you go to the beach or the pool you'll almost invariably have your tallit katan off long enough for there to be hesech hadaas, so when you put it back on you'll make a bracha on it. I think some people might argue that in ...


3

The Aruch HaShulchan (OC 62:1) in discussing how exact one must be when reading the Shema writes: וכך שנו חכמים במשנה (טו א): קרא ולא דקדק באותיותיה – יצא. ופירש רש"י: שלא דקדק לפרשן יפה בשפתיו. עד כאן לשונו. ואין הכוונה שלא פירש התיבות והאותיות כלל, כגון שאמר חצי תיבות וכיוצא בזה. דוודאי בכהאי גוונא לא יצא, שאין זה קריאה כלל. אלא כוונתו כמו שפירשו ...


2

"בערב" could, I think, mean at mincha, especially among Nusach S'farad users, who often say mincha late. I wouldn't infer too much (e.g. that it means maariv) from the choice of words there. I think it'd be safe to say, based on that description, that some recite it after tachanun before chatzi kadish — but I've never seen this done. In every ...


2

I have a similar issue and come to davening 10 minutes earlier, with my goal being to start shemone esre with the minyan. If I come "on time", I treat myself as coming late to the minyan and abide by those laws: It doesn't seem as though listening to the chazan would work, since he is slurring his words as well.


2

I once heard - do not remember from whom - that we say Hashem's name at the Korbanos that are done for a personal Kapara such as a Chatas and Asham to invoke Hashem's mercy upon us.


2

The Baal Shem Tov and his disciples would pray from prayer books called 'Siddur Ha-Ari' whose main purpose was to present the kavvanot of the Arizal on the words of prayer. These were handwritten manuscripts; later a few versions were printed (here is a page from the one used by the Besht himself). Because the kavvanot sometimes assume certain variations in ...


2

Note: Not all Sefardim have the same Nussach, and not all Ashkenazim have the same Nussach. And this answer ignores the Chasidish [a.k.a. Sefard] Nussach which is a mix of the 2, at some level. And then there's the Nusacch from Teiman. To answer your broad Ashkenazi vs. Sefardi Nussach: The general structure of the Tefilot are the same - Shacharit, Mincha, ...


2

My mother's father was born in Dinov. When he was 14 years old he went to stay with his wealthy cousins in Cologne. At that point he adopted Yekishe Minhagim and kept them his entire life. My uncle and his children have maintained these Minhagim after asking his Rosh Yeshiva.


1

Probably not necessary; if you really feel that the chassidish practice speaks more to you and you want to switch, talk to a rabbi. Some of this will involve whether you believe the old customs or new ones are more accurate, by the way. Look, 500 years ago, each place had its own customs, and when you moved to a new place you generally picked up the ...


1

This idea may have an earlier source, but I found in the Nit'ei Gavriel (Rosh HaShana, ch. 2, fn. 33) that the recitation of the 13 middos causes HaShem to move to His throne of mercy (see also Rosh HaShana 17b), which is why all subsequent recitations are preceded by "Kail Melech Yoshaiv" ("Lord King who sits on the Throne of Mercy").


1

R' M. Mishkelov, a talmid of the Grah, explaining the verse in Mishei בחכמה יסד ארץ כונן שמים בתבונה, says the following (found in the perush haGra"h on Mishlei): Chochma is the Torah as it is - the givens. Chochma is unchanging and constant, therefore it corresponds to ארץ because אין כל חדש תחת השמש, and similarly a Navi is not allowed to create a new ...


1

at least sefaradim don't make this beracha, and i have yet to find a sidur with it. just because we say lehitatef everyday we also have intention on the talit catan, this is also part of the leshem ihud as rabenu iosef haim suggests



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