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7

Various reasons are given for saying Bameh Madlikin. One is to remind people of the things that need to be done before Shabbos (including the proper wicks and oils to use); however, this is not relevant where people pray Maariv after dark anyway, as is generally the chassidic custom, and they therefore omitted it. (Aruch Hashulchan 270:2; R' Avraham Chaim ...


7

Yes, there are many who still do (though unfortunately a minority today). To name a few, Fifth Avenue Synagogue says the Musaf piyutim as does OZ on West Side (or at least they did last time I was there for Parshas Shkalim about 9 years ago), one or more of the Young Israels in the NY area do (I forgot which one but I know that at least one does it). In ...


6

I CMLOR many years ago on the predicament I found myself in davening mincha and ma'ariv in the same two places every day. The former was nusach Ashkenaz and the latter nusach S'farad. The result was that the tzibur around me was effectively saying it only once a day. He said tersely and with a shrug, "it's just a perek of T'hilim." Although there is an ...


6

The -ach-final form is not just a feminine form (even in Biblical but also in later Hebrew) but also: a Biblical-Hebrew pausal masculine form. (E.g., 2 Sh'muel 7:9 has וָאֶהְיֶה עִמְּךָ whereas Sh'mos 3:12 has כִּי אֶהְיֶה עִמָּךְ.) This explanation seems unlikely to me for things like nakdishach (at the start of k'dusha). a rabbinic-Hebrew[1] masculine ...


6

Aruch HaShulchan 268:14 explains that Shabbos is called in the Torah both masculine and feminine. כי קדש היא לכם מחלליה מות יומת is feminine. זכור את יום השבת לקדשו is masculine. In the Torah there is a feminine way of referring to evening (ליל) therefore we say "בה" then. Day (יום) is only masculine in the Torah therefore we say "בו". Mincha time which ...


5

This 2011 link to the Siddur Tefillas Yeshurun metioned by yitznewton may be valuable to sign up for the new edition. You can also contact www.kayj.net You ask for printed editions. The following are available online. You could print what you wanted I suppose. A Category at the Wikimedia Commons for scanned works of Wolf Heidenheim, including a full set ...


5

The Lubavitcher Rebbe (Likutey Sichos 14 pg. 18) explains based on what is explained in Kabbalah that there are three distinct levels on Shabbos: 1) The night of Shabbos 2) The day of Shabbos 3) Mincha on Shabbos afternoon. On Friday night the world receives spiritual energy from the attribute of malchus. On Shabbos day there is an even higher revelation of ...


5

I want to correct and some things that appear in Alex's response above. 1) Saying/learning Bameh madlikin at the beginning of Shabbos is a minhag kadmon, an ancient minhog. That means very old, I don't know exactly, but I could see it being over one thousand years old, and maybe even a good deal longer than that. As stated above Sepharadim say it as well as ...


5

R' Shalom Dovber of Lubavitch writes that it has to do with the difference between the different modes in which Hashem constantly re-creates the world. On weekdays, this is done by Hashem speaking it into existence, which for Him is a form of action (דיבורו של הקב"ה חשיב מעשה), whereas on Shabbos this is done through Hashem's attribute of Wisdom (chochmah). ...


5

Erlau. They dress like Hassidim and they have a rebbe, who holds a tisch, but their traditions and minhagim are Chassam Sofer strictly (In fact, the Erlauer ravs are from the direct line of the Chassam Sofer, and their surname is in fact, Sofer.). They use Ashkenaz siddur, and their culture is an Oberlander culture. You'll also find, if you hang out ...


4

According to Sefer HaKushyos and other sources the reason is because the Torah is read by Shabbos Mincha. Although, this answer still requires further clarification. See https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B1NJHmIXg4QJZEQ2Rk04MkJUN3loRHN6Z1RWX3pQQQ Although regular Nusach Ashkenaz doesn't do this, the Vilna Gaon was of the opinion to do so which is why the ...


4

Sephardi siddurim vary somewhat based upon the traditions they follow. For example, De Sola Pool's siddur is used in Spanish-Portuguese synagogues, while Moroccans while often use Siddur Darkei Avot. Some obvious variants include the texts of Havdalah. You can read more about these (and other) variants relevant section of Keter Shem Tob by Shem Tov Gaguine. ...


4

According to the Rambam Hil. Tefillah 1:2, Tefillah ends with hoda'ah, gratitude, not a request to grant peace. Bakashos, requests, are in the middle of the tefillah. My Rav gave a shiur based on the above, plus the idea of bircas kohanim following avodah (Shmini 9:22) (and other sources), that sim shalom is a distinct part of tefillah specially instituted ...


4

Selichos is a prayer service that was not formalized until late in the Gaonic period. This means that there was already greater geographic diversity before any of the prayers were established. Before the gaonic period, only the viduy and 13 middot were 'required'. This is different than most other tefilot which already had a basis before the vast ...


4

The difference is indeed that between Biblical and Rabbinic Hebrew. At the end of the eighteenth and beginning of the nineteenth century c.e., there was a movement in Europe to apply Biblical (considered "classic" and more high-tone) rules of grammar to prayer. The advocates of this (among them the highly respected R Wolf Heidenheim) persuaded the editors ...


4

Siach Tefila question 137 & 138 indicates as follows. If one is in the midst of the actual Tachanun (the part where you place your head on your arm) then he should finish the Tachanun, however if one is in any other part then he should stop and say Vayehi Bin'soa.


3

If you look at particular phrases (such as in the section between borchu and shma), and compare the vowels and punctuation, you will find differences in a variety of Ashkenazic siddurim. These differences (such as "b'safah vrurah uvin'imah, kedusha kulam k'echad onim" vs. "b'safah vrurah, uvin'ima kedosha, kulam k'echad onim") reflect slightly different ...


3

Textual variants other than Nusach Ashkenaz simply have the text sim shalom. In Nusach Ashkenaz, it appears that the lengthy sim shalom was intended for prayers at which Birkat Kohanim (which concludes with "may G-d grant you peace") could be said; and an abridged version, shalom rav, at prayers where it couldn't. (At night, as well as afternoons as often ...


3

According to Artscroll (quoting Rabbi (Elie?) Munk), בה refers to שבת (f.), בו refers to the יום (m.) of שבת, and בם refers to many שבתות (f. pl.), referring to the day which is fully שבת. This change is because the night represents the first seventh day, the one of creation, when it was alone without anyone keeping that day, "like a lonely woman without a ...


3

I have been compiling a German siddur for the past fifteen years. It is currently available on www.thebookpatch.com: http://www.thebookpatch.com/BookStoreDetails.aspx?BookID=19123&ID=0da30d3e-df41-4b72-bdbe-ee301d7f0000


3

An interesting example is the Yerushalmi shuls in Israel, who follow the customs of Tamidei HaGra. (I think the Tukachinsky luach mentions this custom.) They don't say Yotzrot or Krovot during the brachot of Shma or Shmone Esrei, but after Shacharit (and before taking out the Torah) they say the piyyutim.


2

I have heard that Ner Yisrael says the Mussaf for Shkalim and Hachodesh as do many shuls that follow the yeshiva's minhagim. Anyone have first-hand experience? I also heard from a number of people (but again, I have not been there to confirm) that Lakewood says many of the piyutim for Arba Parshios. Anyone know exactly which ones they say? I know that ...


2

The first b'racha before "Sh'ma" in the morning has those who say "konam" and those who say "konehem"; those who say "m'ore or sheasisa" and those who say "m'ore or sheyatzarta"; those who say "umamlichin" and those who say "umamlichim". Some include "v'hiskin m'oros...", some include "l'ose orim...", and some include "or chadash..." (and of the latter, ...


2

Erlau daven Nusach Ashkenaz in their main shul in Katamon, (and they are "culturally" hasidic in many ways). In fact, Erlau are more loyal to Minhag Ashkenaz that the vast majority of Nusach Ashkenaz shuls (except for the Yekkis of course). For example, from what I have heard, they say the traditional piyutim throughout the year, including the Marovis on Yom ...


1

This idea may have an earlier source, but I found in the Nit'ei Gavriel (Rosh HaShana, ch. 2, fn. 33) that the recitation of the 13 middos causes HaShem to move to His throne of mercy (see also Rosh HaShana 17b), which is why all subsequent recitations are preceded by "Kail Melech Yoshaiv" ("Lord King who sits on the Throne of Mercy").


1

The Or Zarua (2:50) writes: ויש מקומות שאומרים להיות לכם לאלקים אני ה' אלהיכם ואינם מפסיקין אבל בספר המקצועות כתב התקינו רבנן למימר בהבלעה בכל צלותא וצלותא רישא וסיפא רישא פעמים באהבה שמע אומרים וענו צבורא שמע ישראל ה' אלהינו ה' אחד וסיפא להיות לכם לאלקים וענו צבורא אני ה' אלהיכם דהיינו כמנהגנו.‏ He says some places say the entire phrase without ...


1

The [Magen Avraham] says that the custom is to say brich hu with the Chazan so that he wouldn't stop there (like the Rama requires and unlike the Mechaber who says that one should stop there). In other words, one is saying (in Aramaic) "...should be praised the name of The Holy One Blessed is He who is above all blessings, praise, etc." Now, people made ...


1

Nusach Ashkenaz does connect Sim Shalom with Birkas Cohanim, as opposed to Nusach Sefard where Shalom Rav is said at Maariv due (I think) to the less obligatory nature of the prayer. The Arizal rules that Sim Shalom is to be said at all three prayers as all three are obligatory, and Sefardim and many Chasidim follow his ruling. I know the Artscroll siddurs ...


1

I have heard before (no source at this moment though) that, Kaballistically, we are talking to the "Shechina" - G-d's presence - which is feminine. Considering the fact that Sefaradim generally tilt towards Kaballah more, especially with regards to prayers, I would assume this is a possible reason



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