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14

The reason one "becomes fleishig", i.e. cannot eat dairy after eating meat, is because of remaining meat in his mouth or esophagus which he cannot have with milk. Now, the Shach and Taz (and Baer Hetev after them, all at 87:3) say there's no meat-and-milk prohibition on eating milk with pork (or other non-kosher animals), so I'd have to assume there's also ...


8

Llamas are members of the Camelidae family, and as such do not have split hooves, only two large toenails, as well as a soft padding behind them. An essential element in an animal being kosher is having split hooves, and hence are not kosher. As members of the camelid family there are presumably included in the verse under the general category of camels, all ...


6

Beeswax itself does not pose any inherent kashrus problem. From the OU website: Beeswax is a substance secreted from glands in bees’ abdomen. Bees use this wax to create the honeycombs in which they store honey. Beeswax is used in foods as a coating to fruits to extend their shelf life, to give a shine to round candies such as chocolates, jelly beans and ...


6

The manure is completely broken down and absorbed by the soil. An analogy can be made using the difference between honey and milk. Manure is actually that which is rejected by the non-kosher animal. It is not created in the animal's body. As a result, it is considered as external chemical that have been separated from the food that the animal ate, broken ...


5

The Lubavitcher Rebbe strongly suggested (Sha'rey Halacha Uminhag Chelek Gimmel pg. 233, English translation here) that children not be surrounded by even pictures or toys of impure animals. He explains the tremendous impact visual stimuli has on a person's mind both for good and bad, and how children are particularly susceptible since the impressions formed ...


5

The earliest source I know of is Mishna Chullin 8:4, which says one is allowed to cook (and derive benefit from) meat from a non-kosher animal in kosher-animal milk, or meat from a kosher animal in non-kosher-animal milk. Meat from a kosher animal (say, cattle), even if the meat itself is not kosher (e.g. it was not slaughtered) may not be cooked with milk. ...


4

Concurring with msh210. The Biblical prohibition on meat-with-milk only applies to kosher species. Presumably Chazal didn't bother adding a rabbinic prohibition if someone chooses to cook their pork in milk. So no, it wouldn't render the person "fleishig."


4

The Rambam rules (Avot HaTumah 2:1) that if one shechts a non-kosher animal it does not attain Nevelah status until it finishes dying, unlike by kosher Shechita where it is considered dead immediately after the Shechita even as it is twitching (and additionally, Kosher Shechita should remove the tumah and prohibition of Nevela, but possibly leaving it as a ...


4

The Shulchan Arukh rules (OC 451:4) that a vessels used on a fire like a skewer or grill need to be heated up until sparks come off of them in order to kasher them. My understanding is that this is about 1000 degrees Fahrenheit or when it glows red. If it is earthenware you'd have to refire it in a kiln (ibid. :1). I can't comment about the specifics of any ...


3

Rabbi J. David Bleich quotes R. Moshe on this question as follows ("SURVEY OF RECENT HALAKHIC PERIODICAL LITERATURE," Tradition 18:4): Rabbi Feinstein addresses himself specifically to the question of government supervision and to the contention that fear of punitive measures may constitute an adequate substitute for the presence of a mashgiach. ...


3

Kosher slaughter is not simply any humane method of slaughter. It is a specific procedure, with precise details that must be followed. One does not need to follow this procedure when slaughtering animals for most non-food purposes, including clothing. However, you should slaughter the animal humanely, becaue there is a separate prohibition against causing ...


3

One may not do business with food objects as food if they are biblically forbidden to eat, except Chelev (certain forbidden fats) which are specially excluded (Leviticus 7:24) from this prohibition. If one happened to acquire such foods he may sell them, but should do so immediately. (my summary of Shulchan Aruch YD 117) Accordingly, one should not raise ...


2

Besides the answer from @Jewels we have the answer from impure animals: present, future, past which actually mentions the llama specifically. The comment is Interesting explanation from a comment here: Gamal, Shafan, Arnevet are written in the Torah in the three tenses (past, present, future) and so refer to Bactrian camels (past, where Avraham came ...


2

I asked R' Natan Slifkin this question by email, and he responded that no, rapidly-moving plants are not considered animals, as dictated by common sense.


2

According to the Shulhan 'Aruch (Y"D 87:9-11) and the RaM"A (ibid), liquid milk found in the stomach of a Kosher animal (Kosher for this purpose means all of the following: "clean" species and properly slaughtered and without invalidating blemishes which would make it a Treifah), that is either salted with the stomach or left standing in the stomach for 24 ...


2

I spoke to someone who owns a kosher store. He gave me two viewpoints: 1 - Many health inspectors have egos. Sometimes, they cite things for violations that aren't actually there. Even if they do not want to wield their power, there are nuances between the itemized list that they must check on the violations sheet, and what actually exists. E.g. - the store ...


1

Animals do not impart or contract ritual impurity while alive (at least not in any situation remotely likely for a pet owner (or anyone) to encounter).


1

The Divrei Chaim (Sanz) writes very emphatically about using only a feather from a Kosher bird, though this is an almost-universal practice even among contemporary sefardim (relatively few of whom still use reeds). However the halacha of "min hamuttar l'picha" only applies to the ink and parchment (Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 32:5-8) so even those who dispute ...


1

I recall explicitly learning that shechitah accomplishes nothing from a halachic perspective on non-kosher species; but would have to find the source. There are stories of people who had to eat a non-kosher animal (either due to starvation or some odd medical condition) where they shechted it first to feel less bad about doing what needed to be done, but ...



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