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31

The Torah says that we may not eat anything without fins and scales if it is among the "sea-life" or of the "beasts of the sea" (Vaykira 11:10) which the Ramban thinks refers specifically to sea creatures that have two legs like those of land-creatures. Assuming that he's talking about mermaids, he implies that they have two legs, instead of fins, and are ...


17

The reason one "becomes fleishig", i.e. cannot eat dairy after eating meat, is because of remaining meat in his mouth or esophagus which he cannot have with milk. Now, the Shach and Taz (and Baer Hetev after them, all at 87:3) say there's no meat-and-milk prohibition on eating milk with pork (or other non-kosher animals), so I'd have to assume there's also ...


15

The gemara in Bechoros 8a which discusses mermaids says they can be impregnated by people. As such, they would be non-kosher due to the qualification found there 7b a kosher fish lays eggs and a non-kosher fish births a live creature. This is the simple understanding found in the pirushim on the Tosefta there chapter one, number five. Tosafos there ...


9

Llamas are members of the Camelidae family, and as such do not have split hooves, only two large toenails, as well as a soft padding behind them. An essential element in an animal being kosher is having split hooves, and hence are not kosher. As members of the camelid family there are presumably included in the verse under the general category of camels, all ...


8

Dr. Leiman writes on the mouse that is 'half-mouse-half-earth" that, (p.452): "... it comes as no surprise that the rabbis discussed the status of a creature they had never seen, and one that modern scholarship would label as imaginary. The greatest scientists and historians of their day took its existence for granted. If so, its halakhic status needed ...


8

The medrash tanchuma on parshas Shmini #7 takes the opinion that at that great feast of Beheimos and Leviason, the mitzvos which until now were only to purify/smelt the people with will no longer apply. The proof is that the Beheimos will not have a proper slaughtering, but will rather be killed by the Liviason. The medrash goes on to prove that Liviason is ...


6

It says in Sanhedrin 59b כי הא דרבי שמעון בן חלפתא הוה קאזיל באורחא, פגעו בו הנך אריותא דהוו קא נהמי לאפיה, אמר: (תהלים ק"ד) הכפירים שאגים לטרף. נחיתו ליה תרתי אטמתא, חדא אכלוה וחדא שבקוה. איתיה ואתא לבי מדרשא, בעי עלה: דבר טמא הוא זה או דבר טהור? - אמרו ליה: אין דבר טמא יורד מן השמים. בעי מיניה רבי זירא מרבי אבהו: ירדה לו דמות חמור מהו? - אמר ליה יארוד ...


6

Beeswax itself does not pose any inherent kashrus problem. From the OU website: Beeswax is a substance secreted from glands in bees’ abdomen. Bees use this wax to create the honeycombs in which they store honey. Beeswax is used in foods as a coating to fruits to extend their shelf life, to give a shine to round candies such as chocolates, jelly beans and ...


6

The manure is completely broken down and absorbed by the soil. An analogy can be made using the difference between honey and milk. Manure is actually that which is rejected by the non-kosher animal. It is not created in the animal's body. As a result, it is considered as external chemical that have been separated from the food that the animal ate, broken ...


6

This issue is the one behind the famous New York City non-Kosher water scandal. Basically, the issue is that there are tiny crustaceans in NYC tap water. The Star-K gives a nice overview of the issue. In short, everybody agrees that if a micro-organism is too small to be seen without magnification, it does not cause any kashrut issue. On the other-hand, ...


5

One may not do business with food objects as food if they are biblically forbidden to eat, except Chelev (certain forbidden fats) which are specially excluded (Leviticus 7:24) from this prohibition. If one happened to acquire such foods he may sell them, but should do so immediately. (my summary of Shulchan Aruch YD 117) Accordingly, one should not raise ...


5

The Rambam rules (Avot HaTumah 2:1) that if one shechts a non-kosher animal it does not attain Nevelah status until it finishes dying, unlike by kosher Shechita where it is considered dead immediately after the Shechita even as it is twitching (and additionally, Kosher Shechita should remove the tumah and prohibition of Nevela, but possibly leaving it as a ...


5

The Lubavitcher Rebbe strongly suggested (Sha'rey Halacha Uminhag Chelek Gimmel pg. 233, English translation here) that children not be surrounded by even pictures or toys of impure animals. He explains the tremendous impact visual stimuli has on a person's mind both for good and bad, and how children are particularly susceptible since the impressions formed ...


5

The earliest source I know of is Mishna Chullin 8:4, which says one is allowed to cook (and derive benefit from) meat from a non-kosher animal in kosher-animal milk, or meat from a kosher animal in non-kosher-animal milk. Meat from a kosher animal (say, cattle), even if the meat itself is not kosher (e.g. it was not slaughtered) may not be cooked with milk. ...


4

The Shulchan Arukh rules (OC 451:4) that a vessels used on a fire like a skewer or grill need to be heated up until sparks come off of them in order to kasher them. My understanding is that this is about 1000 degrees Fahrenheit or when it glows red. If it is earthenware you'd have to refire it in a kiln (ibid. :1). I can't comment about the specifics of any ...


4

According to the source in this answer to that question, Rabbi Menachem Genack of the OU had been quoted as saying The tissue samples would have to come from an animal that had been slaughtered according to kosher rules


4

As we see farther on, the "clean" animals are the ones designated for the altar. While Noach and the others are allowed to eat any animal, the ones being given to Hashem as a sacrifice are restricted more. See the relevant pesukim and the meforshim on the sacrifice upon exiting the ark. Rabbi Shimshon Rafael Hirsch, for example, goes into a long analysis ...


4

Concurring with msh210. The Biblical prohibition on meat-with-milk only applies to kosher species. Presumably Chazal didn't bother adding a rabbinic prohibition if someone chooses to cook their pork in milk. So no, it wouldn't render the person "fleishig."


3

Kosher slaughter is not simply any humane method of slaughter. It is a specific procedure, with precise details that must be followed. One does not need to follow this procedure when slaughtering animals for most non-food purposes, including clothing. However, you should slaughter the animal humanely, becaue there is a separate prohibition against causing ...


3

From The Living Torah by Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan זצ"ל: In Leviticus 11:18, among the non-kosher birds: וְאֶת־הַתִּנְשֶׁ֥מֶת וְאֶת־הַקָּאָ֖ת וְאֶת־הָרָחָֽם׃‏ The swan, the pelican and the magpie. In his footnotes: 11:18 swan. Tinshemeth in Hebrew; kuknos in Greek; cycnus in Latin. Other sources identify it as a bat, chauve-souris in French ...


3

Isaac Levy who translated his grandfather's chumash (Rav Shimshon Rafael Hirsch) from German to English deliberately leaves tinshemes (as did his grandfather) in 11:18 untranslated because all birds not named are kosher and the consequences of an error would be too great. He comments that his grandfather had deliberately not translated the name of the bird ...


3

Rabbi J. David Bleich quotes R. Moshe on this question as follows ("SURVEY OF RECENT HALAKHIC PERIODICAL LITERATURE," Tradition 18:4): Rabbi Feinstein addresses himself specifically to the question of government supervision and to the contention that fear of punitive measures may constitute an adequate substitute for the presence of a mashgiach. ...


3

I asked R' Natan Slifkin this question by email, and he responded that no, rapidly-moving plants are not considered animals, as dictated by common sense.


3

Besides the answer from @Jewels we have the answer from impure animals: present, future, past which actually mentions the llama specifically. The comment is Interesting explanation from a comment here: Gamal, Shafan, Arnevet are written in the Torah in the three tenses (past, present, future) and so refer to Bactrian camels (past, where Avraham came ...


2

I spoke to someone who owns a kosher store. He gave me two viewpoints: 1 - Many health inspectors have egos. Sometimes, they cite things for violations that aren't actually there. Even if they do not want to wield their power, there are nuances between the itemized list that they must check on the violations sheet, and what actually exists. E.g. - the store ...


2

According to the Shulhan 'Aruch (Y"D 87:9-11) and the RaM"A (ibid), liquid milk found in the stomach of a Kosher animal (Kosher for this purpose means all of the following: "clean" species and properly slaughtered and without invalidating blemishes which would make it a Treifah), that is either salted with the stomach or left standing in the stomach for 24 ...


2

The Gemara has a lot of philosophical discussion on what the halacha would be in a hypothetical situation that in reality probably never happened but is discussed for the sake of Torah and Emes. So they were discussing the halacha of whether a mermaid is a kosher fish because it has fins and scales or whether it is a non-kosher mammal because it lacks the ...


2

Animals do not impart or contract ritual impurity while alive (at least not in any situation remotely likely for a pet owner (or anyone) to encounter).


2

The assumption behind this question is that every letter, every word and every verse of the Torah is measured out carefully. Thus, we see that from an extra vav, a halacha may be derived. When, in the discussions often found in the gemara, one Tanna interprets an extra word in one way to prove his point, we must take pains to explain how his disputant, the ...


1

Blockquote I am not an expert in hares and hyraxes but the camel's issue is foot related but the others are cud related. I think the hare has 2 types of poop. One which it re-eats and the final form. Presumably the hyrax does the same thing with barf. We need the other 2 to say that these activities don't count as cud chewing. i'm upvoting your answer ...



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