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The Netai Gavriel brings just about all there is to bring on the subject of Nitel. In 2:4 he brings two/three customs about the time of day or night it applies to. Although the custom is (perhaps more commonly) only from sunset or dusk until midnight, some (Chernobler, Belz, Bobov, Ger and Galitziyana) start from midday the day before (so that would be ...


0

The Nitei Gavriel which @yishai linked has an abundance of info of the customs and history of nittal nacht. Rav Aviner brings a nice summary from his tshuvot (text): "Question: Is it permissible to learn Torah on "Nittel Nacht" (Christmas Eve)? Answer: There is a custom among some Chasidim not to learn Torah on "Nittel Nacht" in order not to contribute ...


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There are people who don't like saying "Christ", and therefore don't like saying "Christmas." If you don't have a strong secular education, you'd assume that "X" just means "fill-in-the-blank", so "X-mas" sounds like a more "kosher" way to refer to the holiday. (This is what my camp counselors did when I was a kid, and that was their explanation.) As Ze'ev ...


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The word Christ comes from the Greek Χριστός, and the initial letters, ΧΡ (chi rho), was a common abbreviation in handwritten manuscripts and a symbol for Christianity. The English Xmas as an abbreviation of Christmas is long-attested: Xres mæsse appears in the "Anglo-Saxon Chronicle" (c.1100). At some point in English the r was dropped from the ...



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