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18

Rav Moshe Feinstein, in a t'shuva about allowing children to say a generic prayer in public school (Orach Chayim II #24), refers to the Ramba"m's statement in Mishne Torah that Adam Harishon was given 6 commandments, including belief in God. No'ach and his descendants later got one more, adding up to 7. They both conclude that not only the negative aspect of ...


14

Bavli AZ 6b מנין שלא יושיט אדם כוס של יין לנזיר ואבר מן החי לבני נח ת"ל ולפני עור לא תתן מכשול Whence [do we know that] a man shouldn't pass a cup of wine to a Nazir nor a limb-from-a-live-animal to a gentile? The verse states: And before a blind person do not place a stumbling block.


13

Given the Rambam's statement: Anyone who accepts upon himself the fulfillment of these seven mitzvot and is precise in their observance is considered one of 'the pious among the gentiles' and will merit a share in the world to come. This applies only when he accepts them and fulfills them because the Holy One, blessed be He, commanded them in the ...


11

Because it wasn't put to them as a choice, but unilaterally imposed on Noach and his descendants by G-d. Being human carries basic obligations, because humans have abilities animals do not and a corresponding charge that animals do not: basic maintenance of the world (the Jewish understanding of the word often mistranslated to English as "subdue").


11

God expects Jews to follow the torah and gentiles to follow the Noachide laws. Until you've converted you're still a gentile and don't have additional heavenly obligations. Perhaps you have heard of people in the process of conversion being required to do more. If so, it's likely a misunderstanding. Once you are studying with a rabbi he will guide you to ...


10

Rabi Menachem Azaria from Pano says that the Thirty commandments is sections of the 7 commandments (עשרה מאמרות, מאמר חקור דין חלק ג פרק כא). Rashi on the Gmara says that we don't know what is the list of the 30 commandments. See also the Talmud Yerusalmi (מסכת ע"ז דף ט,א פרק ב הלכה א גמרא) that says in the future Bnei Noach get 30 commandments. Maybe ...


10

The Mishneh Torah rules: The prohibition applies to a limb or flesh that is separated from either a domesticated animal or a beast. However, it appears to me that a gentile is not executed for eating a limb taken from a living bird. ( Melachim uMilchamot 9:11) Though the Rava'ad (see Moznaim ibid) disagrees, he exempts a sheretz (creeping creature), ...


8

While I do not mean to suggest that they cannot have a portion in the world to come, if they do keep the 7 mitzvos, they are nevertheless not permitted to observe another religion: The general principle governing these matters is: They are not to be allowed to originate a new religion or create mitzvot for themselves based on their own decisions. They ...


8

We call them the "sheva mitzvos bnei Noach," but I think that the term is "lav davka" (imprecise). See Rambam, Melachim 9:1. From his language, it seems that Og was obligated in all seven except ever min hachai. But see the Kesef Mishneh there ('ד"ה על ששה דברים כו); from his language it seems that Og was either not allowed to eat meat at all or was also ...


8

Some say that the Dor HaMabul had the halachik status of Bnei Yisroel, so they did have a shiur of Shava Prutah. Source: Rabbi Yechiel Halpern of Minsk (1660- 1747) in Sefer HaLikutim, Mabul, §1


8

There's a growing movement of people like you, devoted to God but not Jewish, and I suggest that hooking up with that movement may help you find a wife from within it. See Wikipedia on Noahidism.


8

Basing himself on Maimonides' ruling in Hilkhot Melakhim (8:10), "וכן צוה משה רבינו מפי הגבורה לכוף את כל באי העולם לקבל מצות שנצטוו בני נח" , the Lubavitcher Rebbe argued that it is incumbent upon each Jew to persuade the gentiles into observance of the seven Noahide laws. See Ha-Pardes vol. 59:9 (1985), pp. 7-11. Michael J. Broyde, “The Obligation of Jews ...


8

The source for these laws is traditional from Chazal, and they explicitly list them in Sanhedrin 56a: תנו רבנן שבע מצות נצטוו בני נח דינין וברכת השם ע"ז גילוי עריות ושפיכות דמים וגזל ואבר מן החי Translation: Our Rabbis taught: seven precepts were the sons of Noah commanded: social laws; to refrain from blasphemy, idolatry; adultery; bloodshed; robbery; ...


7

There are certain foods likely to be taken from live animals and most others would not be. So for example, I'd trust that most chicken or beef available on the market is not eiver min hachai. But snow crab legs are apparently often taken from live snow crabs. So if the ben noach knows what foods are likely to be problematic, they can avoid those or devote ...


7

Chemdas Yisroel (R' Meir Dan Plozky Zatzal) 42 says that in such a case the convert would not be executed.


7

The Gemara says that a non-Jew is liable to death for stealing less than a penny. "אמר רבי חייא בר אבא אמר רבי יוחנן בן נח נהרג על פחות משוה פרוטה ולא ניתן להשבון" The Rambam agrees.


6

It seems from the gemara (Hullin 92a bottom line) that they did indeed accept commandments upon themselves. The gemara uses the phrase: שלשים מצות שקבלו עליהם בני נח Thirty commandments which Bnei Noach accepted upon themselves.


6

Even so, the definition of chamas, as opposed to gezel, according to Rabbi Chanina in Bereishit Rabba is less than a shava peruta. (So too Rav Acha in Yerushalmi Bava Metzia.) Since the pasuk mentioned chamas, rather than gezel, it is a midrashic approach to look at the halachic definition of a chamsan. The courts back then, presumably, did not work ...


6

R. Shmuel ben Hofni Gaon lists the 30 mitzvot as follows: א. עבודה זרה ב. ברכת השם ג. יחוד השם ד. תפילה ה. שבועת שקר ו. הריגת אדם את עצמו ז. הריגת אדם את זולתו ח. אשת איש ט. עריכת נשואין על ידי מוהר ומתן י. האחות יא. משכב זכור יב. הרבעת בהמה יג. סירוס יד. נבלה טו. אבר מן החי החי טז. דם מן החי יז. איסור כלאים בבהמות יח. חסר מכתב היד יט. ...


6

He's accountable because he should have learned the laws and he didn't (Rambam, Melachim 10:1). Rabbi Elchanan Wasserman (Kovetz Maamarim, Maamar Al Emunah; partially translated online here) explains that a person naturally should think about the purpose of life, and you certainly don't think the purpose of life is to drink beer. You will eventually come to ...


6

There are a number of Rabbis, mostly Chabad, involved in teaching Bnei Noach and answering their halachic questions. One of the more prominent ones is Rabbi Yaakov Rogalsky, co-author of Path of the Righteous Gentile. Another is Rabbi Chaim Richman.


6

According to this source, there is no source: No discussion of Jewish attitudes toward Aristotle can be complete (not that this essay aspires to completeness in any event) without mention of the infamous, scurrilous "Rabbitstotle" legend of the great philosopher being caught devouring a live rabbit, and responding to his surprised observer that ...


6

Let me respond as a convert and someone who has seen a few things that might be relevant to explaining the situation. First of all, most synagogues I've attended are fine with visitors who are not Jewish, but some synagogues have had unfortunate experiences that may have colored their view. For example, when I was in college, I went to services at the ...


6

Your first question should be asked of somone who is an expert in animal slaughter such as the OU or the STAR-K (Baltimore Vaad Hakashrus) who can tell you if the 'humane' practices required by the FDA ensure that the meat is not 'living' when it is being cut up originally. It could be a matter of how long after the slaughter they wait to actually cut it ...


6

Yes there are many differences. Jews are allowed to eat pieces taken from the animal immediately after shechita is performed, even while the animal is still moving מפרכס (blood must still be removed -- which is harder to do compared to regular meat, because it was taken alive-ish). Shechita kills the animal, even if it is still convulsing. (Simla Chadasha ...


5

As far as I'm aware, just about every posek assumes that all nations are obligated to believe in God in some way or another. This is stated explicitly by Rav Shmuel ben Hofni Gaon (commentary to Beraishis 34:12), Rabbeinu Nissim Gaon (intro to Talmud), probably the opinion of the Sefer Hachinuch (commandment 417, and Minchas Chinuch there), Maharal (Gevuros ...


5

Blasphemy is not the problem — it refers to cursing G-d with His name (Rambam, Melachim 9:3). The problem is idolatry, and the consensus is that Christianity is idolatry. However, the Rambam writes elsewhere (I can't find it right now) that a non-Jew only receives reward for doing the things he is commanded in if he does them because G-d commanded them; if ...


5

The Mishneh Torah, in Hilkhot Melakhim u-Milchamot 10:6-7[4-5], says: ו [ד] בן נוח שבירך את השם, או שעבד עבודה זרה, או שבא על אשת חברו, או שהרג חברו, ונתגייר--פטור. הרג בן ישראל, או שבא על אשת ישראל, ונתגייר--חייב; והורגין אותו על בן ישראל, וחונקין אותו על אשת ישראל שבעל--שהרי נשתנה דינו. ז [ה] כבר ביארנו שכל מיתת בני נוח בסיף--אלא אם כן בעל אשת ...


5

The Chazon Ish (Y.D. 62:20) writes that in all likelihood, Noahides are commanded against heresy, because belief in God is the foundation for all 7 commandments that they are actually commanded in. However, he himself is unsure whether this heresy is defined in the same way as it would be for a Jew, considering that there are some authorities who permit ...



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