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20

The Shulchan Aruch Even HaEzer 4:13 says that a ben or bat niddah is 'pagum' (defective). The Beit Shemuel, Chelkat Mechokek and Gra (the major commentaries there) all say that this is not to exclude them from a kohein.


17

Someone asked this of Rabbi Yaakov Hopfer, a major posek on these matters in Baltimore. He said without hesitation that it was permissible. His interpretation of the prohibition on "s'chok vekalut rosh" is "behavior that is suggestive or disinhibiting." I don't see a normal "I love you" as either of those.


16

The Gemara says in Kiddushin that it's derived from a verse "ותהי נדתה עליו" - that even when one is a Nidda, there still is "Haviya" (marriage). Therefore, Kiddushin by a nidda works. If so, there are no issues of Mamzeirus.


12

Yes, someone who eats impure food becomes impure themselves (Rambam Shar Avot Hatumah 8:10). However, this needs some perspective. Niddah is one kind of impurity, and another one is that of a corpse (see Numbers 19). The procedure for purifying oneself of Niddah-impurity is by using a mikvah which can and is done today regularly. The procedure for purifying ...


11

Tough question. I know a lot of nerves can be frazzled by this one. In Temple times, when ritual purity affected all sorts of aspects of daily life, this might be a different question; but today, women's regular use of mikva is only to end the status of nida. On the one hand, the woman would like to increase her religious observance (a wonderful thing), ...


10

This article from Dr J Menczer indicates that although there is a significantly lower incidence of cervical cancer amongst Jews it is not due to family purity laws, as even Jews who do not observe these laws have a lower incidence of cervical cancer.


10

A person whose wife is nidah is still obligated to love her as much as he loves himself; anything he says in order to "lessen the tension in the air" is permitted (Nit'ei Gavriel 33:4 and footnote 8). So I guess to say "I love you" to "lessen the tension in the air" is permitted, but to say it for no reason may be closer to lightheadedness.


10

Basically, if a couple has valid reason to not have children right now, then a pill that prevents menstruation is fine. Judaism regards having children as a mitzvah, though (as in many things in life) it's complicated and there are caveats. It's recommended -- and according to some, required -- that a couple consult with their rabbi first before using birth ...


9

Per Rabbi Shimon Eider's Sefer Hilchos Nidah a lady who is a Nidah should not sing in front of her husband.


9

YD §193 is about this. It is too comprehensive a discussion for me to adequately address here. Some basic points, however: Blood which comes from a wound - דם מכה - does not render a woman a Niddah. Technically speaking, hymeneal bleeding - דם בתולים - is blood from a wound. However, due to certain Halachic concerns, various amora'im (and some tanna'im ...


9

Rabbi Isaac ben Sheshet was asked (Responsum 425) why no rabbinic edict requiring unmarried women to regularly purify themselves in the Mivka was ever enacted in order to minimize the transgressions of those who engage in extra-marital sexual contact. (I note the whole basis of the question is that in the days when women regularly or even semi-regularly were ...


8

Yes, such classes exist, and are recommended for potential bridegrooms. Speak to the rabbi of any orthodox synagogue, and he should be able to direct you someone who can tutor you in this field. So, I suspect, can the head or mashgiach of any bes midrash. Covered topics are hilchos nida and v'sasos, k'vod ishto, and others, though the exact list varies from ...


7

The Debreciner in Shaalos U'Tshuvos Beer Moshe Chelek 3 Siman 123 says that the Minhag is to allow one to play Dreidel with their wife while she is a Niddah. However he recommends making a Heker* - either by each one using their own Draidel or any other type of Heker. If the entire family is playing and they are not sitting next to each other then you can ...


7

The opinion of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein -- which I've heard quoted by several prominent American Ashkenazi authorities on Laws of Nida -- is that the "modesty" required of a woman in her own home, when she's a nida, is not the full set that would apply for going out in public (e.g. hair covering). Rather, it's whatever she would normally feel comfortable ...


7

When I got married I was told by my Rabbi who gave me a Choson Shmeus that it is the husbands responsibility. I have no idea what you are talking about when you say "The man often wants to know why, which they are usually reluctant to tell him". I never asked why on a Psak and if I did my Rav would not hesitate to explain. You say "The man often asks is ...


7

It's of Biblical force and punishable as such, but yes we need to apply the Oral Law (namely one of Rabbi Yishamel's 13 principles) to spell it out. Rambam Laws of Prohibitions on Relations 4:3: ד,ג במה דברים אמורים שהטומאה תלויה בימים, בשטבלה במי מקוה אחר הימים הספורים. אבל נידה וזבה ויולדת שלא טבלו במי מקוה--הבא על אחת מהן, אפילו אחר כמה שנים--חייב ...


7

I really wouldn't call them "chumra" days. They're rabbinically required. And they protect you in case any period is at all funny, you could wind up in a zava situation -- or nida-still-within-the-seven -- without knowing it (in which case mikva and everything accomplishes nothing, it would still be liable to Karet.) It's not just about being "careful." If ...


7

The source of this exception from dam makkah is a mishna on Niddah 64b, and the gemara on Niddah 65b. There's a big machloket in the Rishonim about the reason why we have this exception to the general rule that blood from a wound is not niddah blood. I don't know them all of the top of my head, and I recommend The Laws and Concepts of Niddah by Rabbi Zvi ...


6

R' Alfasi's laws of Niddah are actually hidden in the second chapter of tractate Shevuos. If you don't have a printed tractate handy, then see pages 767 through 778 of hebrewbooks.org's Sanhedrin-Makkos-Shevuos PDF. As a courtesy to the reader ש”ס נהרדעא also includes a second copy of R' Alfasi's laws of Niddah inside tractate Niddah. This second copy is ...


6

Although the question originally conflated a zavah with woman who is niddah, this obligation applies to a woman who is experiencing discharge beyond her regular menstrual cycle. Regarding the offering brought by a Zav, the male counterpart of a Zavah, the Ibn Ezra on Lev. 15:15 explains that an offering is brought because such discharges are divine ...


5

The short answer is yes there is room for leniency, but as always (and especially in something like this), a competent halachic authority should be consulted. As I heard it from a rabbi who was offering a review shiur on the subject: The original practice was for a woman to wear libunim, freshly-laundered clothes. The idea was that often garments had all ...


5

This is because it is possible to get a period while pregnant, and it's even possible to get pregnant again while already pregnant (i.e. not twins). This is called http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superfetation The halacha takes this into account, and therefor all taharas hamishpacha practices continue like normal during pregnancy. Someone who has a Chazakah ...


5

I'm going to say that whoever wrote the wikipedia article did not understand the sources they were reading. First let me state the noticeable problems. According to Halakha a woman may not tell her husband that she is Tameh when she is not (Even HaEzer 77 and Nosei Kelim). It would give her the status of a moredet, which is a person (a mored in the case ...


5

As Clint already mentioned, the obligation to bring doves applies to a Zava - one who bleeds between the expected times of her period (to oversimplify). So most women never had this obligation. Another missing piece is that the woman does not have to bring the doves immediately - she can accumulate the obligations and bring them all together. As long as ...


4

Should be pretty much the same issue as playing Monopoly or Scrabble or whatnot with your wife. (Unless you argue that the traditional aspect to it makes it less problematic, which I don't particularly hear. Then again I'm not crazy about the whole dreidel thing anyhow, and will refer you to the responsum of Chasam Sofer lamenting that this holiday is ...


4

The difference of minhagim is already mentioned in the Remah himself, see here. Rabbi Wosner in Shiurei Shevet Levi mentions that Yemenites wait 7 days. The reason for waiting before doing a hefsek taharah is because there is a halacha that a woman who discharges live semen is considered tameh (just like any man who emits semen) and that such a tumah ...


4

All such prohibitions are written twice - once as a warning, and the second time to give out the punishment. You see this with all the incestuous prohibitions very clearly. But things in the ten commandments are the same way. No punishments listed there, but the prohibition repeated later with the punishment. In fact, the Talmud will often ask, when it is ...


4

Let's put aside questions of the obligation to have children. Most marriages have some unspoken assumptions, but if the couple goes in with this clear understanding, I really don't see the issue. Rambam writes "you may not marry a woman with plans to soon divorce her, unless she's aware of the plan and okay with it." Similarly there's a Gemara about a Kohen ...



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