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11

Unfortunately, indeed we do not have prophets today, and Chazal say that the last prophets were Hagai, Zecharia and Malachi. Rashi's momentous perush on most of the Bible and most of the gemara speak for themselves, however here are a few quotes (loose translations by me, except for the last Rashi) about his special work (this list can go on forever): The ...


8

There are a couple sources that indicate that Yishmael was a tzaddik at certain points in his life. Rashi to Breishit 25:17 notes that the the word ויגוע is only used by tzaddikim, and is used here to refer to Yishmael at the end of his life. ויגוע: לא נאמרה גויעה אלא בצדיקים:‏ Also, Rashi on 21:17 quotes a midrash where the angels are trying to ...


6

The Rambam knew the pasuk in Yirmeyahu. Just because one has a question based on a plain-text interpretation of a verse, that doesn't mean that people should stop teaching the Rambam. There are many Biblical verses, and many Mishnayot that are interpreted in ways other than what the plain-text meaning seems to be. Rambam designed his framework based on ...


4

Pharaoh is not the first one in the Torah to get a dream. Avimelech and Lavan both had clear. lucid dreams in which it was a clear message from God to them. Nevertheless they aren't considered prophets for that. But in Pharaoh's case it was much less than that. In the Talmud we find a concept of the Baal Hachalomos, which is a sort-of angel or demon who ...


4

Yes this law applies to everyone, even the king of Israel, the kohen gadol, or a previously verified prophet--see Sefer Hachinuch 517. In fact, there is a specific prohibition not to fear executing a false prophet (Sefer HaChinuch 519). Actually, there are some who say that the death penalty applies only to someone who could plausibly have been a prophet, ...


4

No, Jewish sources do not go detail about the test (if any) administered for each of the accepted Jewish prophets, which is what you are looking for. There are discussions of which situations are considered failures of prophetic prediction which prove a prophet false, such as the Rambam's commentary on the Mishna, which I translated here. But this is a ...


3

The Meiri in his Seder ha-Kabbalah (which is the introduction to his commentary on Avot, Ofeq ed. pp. 45-47) says that: ולפעמים היתה הנבואה מבררת להם כל תעלומה, כמו שידעת מדברי קצת חכמינו השלימים שהנבואה תגיד השגות עיוניות לא יוכל העיון להשיגם כ״ש הסברא וכו' אבל מ״מ הם היו נושאים ונותנים בדרכי ההקש והמדות והסברא להוציא לאור תעלומותיהם, וכל זה באין ...


3

" Although the Jewish people demanded of the prophets and priests that followed - Yehoshua, Shmu'el, Pinhas and Elazar - that they ask for Heavenly direction with regard to the questions that arose, each of them replies lo ba-shamyim he - "The Torah is not in Heaven" (see Devarim 30:12). Once the Torah was given at Mount Sinai it is incumbent on the Sages of ...


3

Daniel is in Kesuvim because it is not prophecy. There is a machlokes as to whether Daniel was or was not a prophet. However, we see that Baruch ben Neriyah (Yirmiyahu's student) never became a prophet because he went into exile before he became one (Yirmiyaho 45:3). We also see that Yechezkel (chapter 24) was given when he was already in Bavel. The point ...


3

Yes, you are correct, the Talmude here [pesachim 9b] is making a pun. This is mentioned as one of the more famous examples, but there are others. Another example is Kiddushin 25a, Students called Rav Hemnuna 'cold fish' (for being unable to answer their questions) - המנונא Hemnuna, is similar to חמנונא Chamnuna, which is a 'warm fish.'. See also here for ...


3

Judaica Press explains in Yirmiyahu 18:9 that there is a machlokes between Rambam on the one hand and Abarbene and Ibn Nachmiash on the other hand about this matter. Rambam holds that the prophesy (by a true prophet) will come about but if the people sin, it will not last. I have also seen referenced (about the decree at Rosh Hashana for the coming year) ...


2

Targum Yonathan (Bereshit 27:5) states Rivqah received רוח הקודש Or HaḤayim (ibid) plainly states Rivqah was a prophetess RaSh"I (Bereshit 29:34) states that the foremothers prophesied that Ya'aqov was to father the Twelve Tribes ("האמהות נביאות היו ויודעות שי"ב שבטים יוצאים מיעקב") Sifte'i Ḥakhamim (ibid) makes peace between Megillah 14A and Targum ...


2

Man's blessing in Gen 1:28 reads: וַיְבָרֶךְ אֹתָם, אֱלֹהִים, וַיֹּאמֶר לָהֶם אֱלֹהִים פְּרוּ וּרְבוּ וּמִלְאוּ אֶת-הָאָרֶץ, וְכִבְשֻׁהָ; וּרְדוּ בִּדְגַת הַיָּם, וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם, וּבְכָל-חַיָּה, הָרֹמֶשֶׂת עַל-הָאָרֶץ. And God blessed them; and God said unto them: 'Be fruitful, and multiply, and fill the earth, and subdue it; and have dominion ...


2

I'm pretty sure that Rav Moshe didn't get it from this source, but: R. Nissim (also known as the Ran) writes in his commentary to the Torah (see http://www.otzar.org/wotzar/book.aspx?7943&lang=eng page 366 on the website, ער in the sefer) that before there were famous well-recognized prophets, early prophets were not allowed to reveal their prophecies to ...


1

it seems prophecy is a higher level than ruach hakodesh as Rabbi Chaim Vital brings in gate 4 of shaarei kedusha "After a man has merited to the deveikut, he will merit to the secret of 'equality' (hishtavut), and if he merits the secret of 'equality', he will merit to the secret of 'meditation', and after he has merited to the secret of 'meditation', he ...


1

It was an apparition, not a prophecy. A prophecy is a message from God. Being that he was entitled -for some reason- to conquer the known world, things went his way. The Gemara mentions how Nevuchadnezzar had signs of success. Josephus records apparitions the Hasmonian kings had before a success. In fact, Michael Greenspan has in his documentary, Against ...


1

First I will to try what you intend by prophethy. Prophety is generaly linked to the anticipation of the future. But you mean a divine knowledge. Second, the Halacha. There is two categories: the judgment in a trial between two people, and there is a decision about what is permitted and forbidden by statute (Horayoth). The great assembly, what is so ...


1

No. Rashi was a tremendously great scholar and recipient of oral traditions from the schools of Germany, but he did not receive supernatural ruach hakodesh. The Ohr Hachaim (who lived a few centuries after Rashi) writes in his commentary to Genesis (6: 3) that after the destruction of the Temple prophecy ceased but Ruach Hakodesh continued. (I presume this ...


1

@Fred has provided the source for the "fruit of the lips" concept. I'll leave the task for him to expand upon it, if needed. The proof that a prophet was G-d's "mouthpiece" is in this week's Torah reading. Deuteronomy 18:18: נָבִ֨יא אָקִ֥ים לָהֶ֛ם מִקֶּ֥רֶב אֲחֵיהֶ֖ם כָּמ֑וֹךָ וְנָתַתִּ֤י דְבָרַי֙ בְּפִ֔יו וְדִבֶּ֣ר אֲלֵיהֶ֔ם אֵ֖ת כָּל־אֲשֶׁ֥ר ...


1

Not specifically to Sephardim/Ashkenazi split, but there is a derivation of "flock" from “Ha’emet Tiheye Ne’ederet” that during the times before the advent of Moshiach, Jews will be split. From a discussion on Devarim The Gemara describes certain negative qualities that will characterize the generation before the arrival of Mashiah, one of them being ...


1

The question was specifically about converts becoming Jewish prophets,so here goes: Sh'maya, Sage and President of the Sanhedrin, from a Mideastern religion Avtalyon, Sage and Vice-President of the Sanhedrin, from a Mideastern religion Bithiah, Moshe's foster mother from traditional Egyptian religion Jethro priest of Midian and ...



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