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9

Unfortunately, indeed we do not have prophets today, and Chazal say that the last prophets were Hagai, Zecharia and Malachi. Rashi's momentous perush on most of the Bible and most of the gemara speak for themselves, however here are a few quotes (loose translations by me, except for the last Rashi) about his special work (this list can go on forever): The ...


7

There was once a book that had all the cures you are talking about, but it was buried. In the mishna of Psachim 4:9 it says that the king Chizkia buried "the book of cures": ששה דברים עשה חזקיה המלך על שלשה הודו לו ועל שלשה לא הודו לו. גירר עצמות אביו על מטה של חבלים והודו לו. כיתת נחש הנחשת והודו לו. גנז ספר רפואות והודו לו. The Tashbetz writes (סימן ...


6

I'm not sure that this what you're looking for, but the Gmara in Baba Batra on daf 15 writes: בתר דשכיב משה מי שריא שכינה על עובדי כוכבים והא אמר מר ביקש משה שלא תשרה שכינה על עובדי כוכבים וניתן לו, שנאמר: "ונפלינו אני ועמך". Although it doesn't specify that this was a result of Bilaam but rather a request to make Israel more unique. This Gmara is more ...


5

Chananya ben Azur was a prophet (until he went bad), and he was a Givoni, who are a nation of converts (Rashi on Yirmiyah 28:6).


4

Devarim 13:1-4: Everything I command you that you shall be careful to do it. You shall neither add to it, nor subtract from it. If there will arise among you a prophet, or a dreamer of a dream, and he gives you a sign or a wonder, and the sign or the wonder of which he spoke to you happens, [and he] says, "Let us go after other gods which you ...


4

Pharaoh is not the first one in the Torah to get a dream. Avimelech and Lavan both had clear. lucid dreams in which it was a clear message from God to them. Nevertheless they aren't considered prophets for that. But in Pharaoh's case it was much less than that. In the Talmud we find a concept of the Baal Hachalomos, which is a sort-of angel or demon who ...


4

Yes this law applies to everyone, even the king of Israel, the kohen gadol, or a previously verified prophet--see Sefer Hachinuch 517. In fact, there is a specific prohibition not to fear executing a false prophet (Sefer HaChinuch 519). Actually, there are some who say that the death penalty applies only to someone who could plausibly have been a prophet, ...


4

The Judaica Shmuel Alef quotes Radak, Metzudas David, and Ralbag that they were all overcome by Ruach Hakodesh and began uttering praises of Hashem and short term (near future) prophesies. Shaul had sent them to arrest David and as they approached the group around Shmuel, they lost control of their actions. Pasuk 23 says about Shaul, "and he too prophesied ...


3

If Hashem wanted a ready-made world with nothing left to explore, He could have just stayed with a כסא הכבוד, or better yet, הוא ושמו. This world was created with the theme of constant improvement. Almost all sciences are still unfinished, even language. The same goes for Torah. Although the prophets and Tanaim knew more Torah than we do, the Torah grew and ...


3

Yes, you are correct, the Talmude here [pesachim 9b] is making a pun. This is mentioned as one of the more famous examples, but there are others. Another example is Kiddushin 25a, Students called Rav Hemnuna 'cold fish' (for being unable to answer their questions) - המנונא Hemnuna, is similar to חמנונא Chamnuna, which is a 'warm fish.'. See also here for ...


2

Targum Yonathan (Bereshit 27:5) states Rivqah received רוח הקודש Or HaḤayim (ibid) plainly states Rivqah was a prophetess RaSh"I (Bereshit 29:34) states that the foremothers prophesied that Ya'aqov was to father the Twelve Tribes ("האמהות נביאות היו ויודעות שי"ב שבטים יוצאים מיעקב") Sifte'i Ḥakhamim (ibid) makes peace between Megillah 14A and Targum ...


2

Man's blessing in Gen 1:28 reads: וַיְבָרֶךְ אֹתָם, אֱלֹהִים, וַיֹּאמֶר לָהֶם אֱלֹהִים פְּרוּ וּרְבוּ וּמִלְאוּ אֶת-הָאָרֶץ, וְכִבְשֻׁהָ; וּרְדוּ בִּדְגַת הַיָּם, וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם, וּבְכָל-חַיָּה, הָרֹמֶשֶׂת עַל-הָאָרֶץ. And God blessed them; and God said unto them: 'Be fruitful, and multiply, and fill the earth, and subdue it; and have dominion ...


2

Putting aside the aspects of e.g. the creation story (as interpreted by the medieval Rishonim) that have been confirmed by modern science (e.g. creatio ex nihilo, evolution [see e.g the Drashot Haran], "intelligent design", non-determinism/quantum mechanics) as well as predictions about apocolyptic devastation that strikingly parallel aspects of a nuclear ...


2

I'm pretty sure that Rav Moshe didn't get it from this source, but: R. Nissim (also known as the Ran) writes in his commentary to the Torah (see http://www.otzar.org/wotzar/book.aspx?7943&lang=eng page 366 on the website, ער in the sefer) that before there were famous well-recognized prophets, early prophets were not allowed to reveal their prophecies to ...


1

No. Rashi was a tremendously great scholar and recipient of oral traditions from the schools of Germany, but he did not receive supernatural ruach hakodesh. The Ohr Hachaim (who lived a few centuries after Rashi) writes in his commentary to Genesis (6: 3) that after the destruction of the Temple prohecy ceased but Ruach Hakodesh continued. (I presume this ...


1

@Fred has provided the source for the "fruit of the lips" concept. I'll leave the task for him to expand upon it, if needed. The proof that a prophet was G-d's "mouthpiece" is in this week's Torah reading. Deuteronomy 18:18: נָבִ֨יא אָקִ֥ים לָהֶ֛ם מִקֶּ֥רֶב אֲחֵיהֶ֖ם כָּמ֑וֹךָ וְנָתַתִּ֤י דְבָרַי֙ בְּפִ֔יו וְדִבֶּ֣ר אֲלֵיהֶ֔ם אֵ֖ת כָּל־אֲשֶׁ֥ר ...


1

The basic requirement for a prophet (or just any Jew) is to not change anything written in the Torah (Including of course the Mitzvot). - See Rambam's Hilchot Yesod Torah Halacha Alef for that Halacha specifically for prophets. Additionaly all that the prophet predicts must be true not just a part, and he should be checked many times (except for death, ...


1

According to the Targum Sheni (4:10) Mordechai did in fact send word and request prayers from Haggai, Zecharya, and Malachi regarding the situation.


1

Not specifically to Sephardim/Ashkenazi split, but there is a derivation of "flock" from “Ha’emet Tiheye Ne’ederet” that during the times before the advent of Moshiach, Jews will be split. From a discussion on Devarim The Gemara describes certain negative qualities that will characterize the generation before the arrival of Mashiah, one of them being ...


1

The question was specifically about converts becoming Jewish prophets,so here goes: Sh'maya, Sage and President of the Sanhedrin, from a Mideastern religion Avtalyon, Sage and Vice-President of the Sanhedrin, from a Mideastern religion Bithiah, Moshe's foster mother from traditional Egyptian religion Jethro priest of Midian and ...



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