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22

There is a tradition, recorded in various sources, that the prophet Ovadiah was an Edomite convert. This tradition is born of the fact that there is nothing within his short (one chapter) oracle that concerns Judeans or Israelites; the entire thing is an oracle about the Edomites instead. Sources: Sanhedrin 39b; Tanchuma, Tazria 8. See also Rashi and ...


13

Whether or not David was a navi seems be an age-old discussion among Jewish authorities. On the one hand, there seem to be many futuristic concepts throughout Tehillim, especially about the destruction of the Temple and the eventual redemption. Assuming that David was the author of at least most of the psalms would imply that he had at least some form of ...


11

In general, it seems the prophet would fall into a prophetic state, so it would be clear that it wasn't just a random voice speaking to him. See, for example, Berishis 15 where God appears to Avraham first in "a vision", and then in "a deep sleep... a dread, a great darkness". However, it seems that sometimes Nevuah sounded just like a person's voice, and ...


11

The answer is no. In Yehoshua 23:6, Yehoshua says to the people: וַחֲזַקְתֶּם מְאֹד--לִשְׁמֹר וְלַעֲשׂוֹת, אֵת כָּל-הַכָּתוּב בְּסֵפֶר תּוֹרַת מֹשֶׁה: לְבִלְתִּי סוּר-מִמֶּנּוּ, יָמִין וּשְׂמֹאול Be very strong to protect and do everything that is written in Moshe's Torah. Do not deviate from it to the right or to the left. In Deuteronomy ...


9

This is discussed by Abarbanel in his commentary to Rambam's Moreh Nevuchim (II:32). In his interpretation of R' Yochanan, he denies that R' Yochanan is referring to prophecy at all when he says "God causes his divine presence to rest...". God resting his divine presence on someone is different from His granting someone prophecy. (What exactly "resting His ...


9

Maybe you are thinking of Deuteronomy 34:10: "And there hath not arisen a prophet since in Israel like unto Moses" (OJPS). However, he was certainly not the last prophet; in fact the previous verse refers to Joshua being a prophet. Similarly, there are tons of prophets after Moses later in the Tanach. The verse in Deuteronomy simply means that Moshe was the ...


9

The Tosefta (Sotah 13:4) writes: משמתו נביאים האחרונים חגי זכריה ומלאכי פסקה רוח הקודש מישראל Once the last prophets -- Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi -- died, the prophetic spirit ceased in Israel. Additionally, the Talmud (Bava Batra 14b) writes: וחגי זכריה ומלאכי סוף נביאים הוו Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi were the end of the prophets. ...


9

Yalkut Shimoni on Balak Tanchuma on Balak Midrash Rabah on Balak The gemaras mentioned in Toldos Aharon on Balak For a collection of all midrashim, you can look at R' Menachem Kasher's Torah Shleimah


8

The Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l has a different take on it. In his talk of Shabbos Parshas Vayeishev 5734 (Sichos Kodesh 5734 1:201-202), he explains that Yosef told over these dreams precisely because he hoped to use them to defuse his brothers' jealousy toward him. Previous dreams recorded in the Torah were basically meant to be taken at face value. For ...


8

According to R. Yehudah Halevi, a convert cannot be a prophet. The question on R. Yehudah Halevi's view is that Chazal say Ovadiah was a convert. This question, which was raised by the commentators on the Kuzari, is addressed by R. Yitzchak Sheilat who suggests that R. Yehudah Halevi's view depends on a possible dispute in the Gemara about whether Ovadiah ...


8

The Rambam (Hilchos Teshuva 9:2:) writes that Moshaich will be a prophet: [These changes will come about] because the king who will arise from David's descendants will be a greater master of knowledge than Solomon and a great prophet, close to the level of Moses, our teacher. See also Melachim uMilchamot 12:3, where he writes that Moshaich will have ...


7

Rabbi Feinhandler explains that physical wealth and money are nessesary for two reasons. Even though it says that one shouldn't judge people "by the bottle, but by the content", nonetheless, people do judge people by their external attributes. A prophet and a High Priest must be people who will be respected. So that he has the appropriate self esteem, that ...


7

The Bavli records (Temurah 16a): [The verse states: "These are the commandments" (Leviticus 27)] These are the commandments and no prophet is allowed to innovate something from now on. That said, later authorities do have a number of interesting powers (when not claiming to be doing so under direct divine order) including directing Jews to not perform ...


6

The Ibn Ezra (in his introduction to Malachi) writes that Malachi was the last prophet. The Rambam (Maimonides) in Melachim 11:1 implies that the Mashiach (messiah) will be a prophet (since he refers to the "other prophets"). (I think both of them agree, actually, just that Malachi was the last prophet until Mashiach.)


6

Presumably he thinks he's speaking to Eli. Malbim explains accordingly: Shmuel's "Hineni" in v. 4 is to tell Eli, "I'm not sleeping!" and then he runs over to see just what Eli wants from him. The second and third times, then (vv. 6 and 8), he doesn't need to repeat this phrase, because Eli already knows he's awake; he just goes over and says, "I am here ...


6

You have a few different questions here which I will try to answer in order. There is no simple replacement for prophets because the era of prophecy has ended. The role of the rabbi straddles many different biblical "positions" including judge, advisor, and interpreter of law. I am not sure what you mean by "find truth." If you mean a finding of fact in ...


6

To posit some sort of "prophetic perfect tense" or the like is entirely superfluous. I am confident that one is unable to grammatically distinguish between regular and "prophetic" usage. However we do find examples where a prophet will speak from a point of view in which a future event is seen as having transpired, see Numbers 24:17 for example. This is ...


5

No source right now, but I remember learning that the dreams were a prophecy. And a prophet is obligated to tell over his prophecy. If not, he is liable to die by the hands of Heaven (See Rambam Hilchot Yesodei HaTorah 9:3).


5

The Rambam in Iggeres Teiman explicitly says that prophecy will return in the year 4972 (which is 1216) and says (in the Yad) that Moshiach will be a prophet. Moreover, the Rambam discusses the laws of prophecy in his Mishna Torah in Hilchos Yesodei HaTorah. At first glace, it's out of place (it would be more appropriate to either place these laws in ...


5

http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=47079&st=&pgnum=567 When Nimrod started doing Avoda Zara, the nation of Ashur had no interest in idolatry. The nation of Ashur left their homes and established a new city "Ninve". In that merit Hashem sent Yona to Ninve to tell them to do Teshuva. (Imrei Chein)


5

This source attributes your explanation to the Divrei Shmuel in the name of the Rebbe of Chortkov. I also heard approximately this interpretation in a recent shiur on Parshas Vayechi by R' Fischel Schachter, who said he thought it was from the Chasam Sofer. He begins discussing this at around 11:30 into the shiur.


5

A prophet is confirmed as a true prophet by repeatedly making accurate predictions of the future (and only accurate predictions) or by the [direct] testimony of another confirmed prophet. Mishneh Torah 10:5 When a prophet proclaims that another individual is [also] a prophet, we accept the latter as a prophet without requiring [any further] ...


5

The 9th Ani Maamin - which are based on the 13 principals that the Rambam in his Hakdama to his Pirush on Perek Chelek in Mesechtas Sanhedrin mentions as the points of belief a Jew must have - states that there will be no changes to the Torah. אני מאמין באמונה שלימה שזאת התורה לא תהא מוחלפת ולא תהא תורה אחרת מאת הבורא יתברך שמו. ...


5

According to Midrash Eicha Zuta, it was written by ירמיה (Jeremiah). This is also reflected in the Septuagint (aka LXX aka Targum Shivim), which opens with the line "By Jeremias, in the Captivity." This is probably the oldest tradition. According to Rashi, Midrash Tehillim (aka Midrash Secher Tov), Pesiqta Rabbatti, Ibn Ezra in his introduction to ...


4

The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains as follows (Likkutey Sichos vol. 20 pg. 228): When Yaakov's sons would hear that Moshiach was not scheduled to come for a long time, they would have realised that some considerable additional effort was needed to bring him sooner - as the Talmud states that through additional merit the Redemption comes earlier (Sanhedrin 98a). ...


4

While its likely there was a connection between the disappearance of prophecy and idolatry, this does not mean the connection is absolute. It is probably only for pre-messianic times. The very purpose of Messianic times fits with the idea that there will be prophecy but not idolatry: For the earth shall be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the ...


4

I discuss this a bit when considering whether Rivkah was a prophetess. The seven are: Sarah, Miriam, Deborah, Hannah, Abigail, Huldah, Esther. Chazal are the one who identify these seven; and Chazal also seem to be very reluctant to ascribe prophecy to women in general. See what they say in Bereishit Rabba about Sarah's prophecy: ויאמר ה' לה רבי יהודה בר ...


4

If John Doe says something your first response is "so what?". But when Bill Gates, a Rockefeller, a Hilton even independent of their intellectual capabilities people listen. As the golden rule says "he who has the gold makes the rules". Since the prophet's job is to give over to the people a message the prophet needed the money so people listen to the ...


4

Rabbi Shlomo Kluger explains that the gemara in Berachos teaches that the joy which is experienced as a result of having a good dream can suffice to act as its fulfilment, so that it will no longer actually come to pass. This is why Yosef related the dream to his brothers even though he knew that they would hate him for it, because if he did not tell them ...



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