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12

It is definitely allowed. The custom not to speak between washing and hamotzi is nowhere near as strict as the requirement not to speak between hamotzi and eating the bread. The Gemara in Brachot (40a) that you remember permits you to speak between hamotzi and eating for essential purposes ("take some bread," "bring salt/seasoning," "feed the animals"). ...


12

The opinion of Harav Moshe Feinstein zt”l holds two slices makes you responsible to wash.(I believe this would be the Main Psak (Halachic Ruling) for American's) Harav Shlomo Zalman Aurbach zt”l, and Harav Elyashiv say one slice of Pizza since it has 8-9 k’zaysim it would require one to wash and bentch. Rav Belsky Shlita Rosh Yeshiva of Torah Voddas and ...


11

May I call you user1208? There are 2 questions there: Am I allowed to interrupt in such a circumstance? (Yes) If I do interrupt (legally or illegally), does that require me to wash again? (No) Even when we have strict standards for interrupting between related brachos, like birchos krias shema, we pasken like Rabbi Yehuda in Brachos 2:1- ובפרקים שואל ...


10

According to the Chazon Ish (Orach Chaim 24:20) they must be completely dry before washing or the washing is invalid b'dieved. According to the Mishna Berura (Beiur Halachah 162:2) they may even be completely wet before washing. The Baal haTanya apparently holds in his Shulchan Aruch like the Mishna Berura but rules in his siddur like the Chazon Ish.


10

The Shulchan Aruch OC 161:3 צריך להסיר הטבעת מעל ידו בשעת נט"י ( ואפילו הוא רפוי) (ב"י) ואפי' אינו מקפיד עליו בשעת נטילה, הואיל ומקפיד עליו בשעה שעושה מלאכה, שלא יטנפו (הרא"ש פ' תינוקת) (ונהגו קצת להקל אם הוא רפוי, אבל יש להחמיר, כי אין אנו בקיאים איזה מיקרי רפוי). (My translation): You must remove your rings at the time of washing, even if you do not ...


9

In the Aruch HaShulchan OH 167:17 LINK he writes that if one forgot, said the beracha of hamotzei before he made netilas yadiim, he can wash his hands and the washing is not considered an interruption, and therefore he does not need to repeat the hamotzei after he washes


9

The Mishna Brura in OC 1 says: י"א דלענין זה אמרינן כולא ביתא כד' אמות דמי אבל אין לסמוך ע"ז כ"א בשעת הדחק. "There are those who say that with regard to this (washing hands), we say that the entire house is as 4 amos (cubits), but one should only rely on this when forced." The Aruch HaShulchan in OC 4 says: מפני שיש מחמירים ומזהירים ע"פ הזוהר שאסור לילך ...


9

The Taamei HaMinhagim, in "הנהגות אדם בבוקר" says: ג טעם שתקנו רז״ל לומר על נט״י בנוסח ברכה זו לשון נטילה, מפני שהוא לשון הגבהה מתרגום "ותשאני רוח" "ונטלתני", וכתיב (ישעיה ס"ג) "וינטלם וינשאם כל ימי עולם" - שצריך שיגביה ידיו למעלה (שלחן ארבע) :‏ ד עוד טעם לפי שצריך ליטול מן הכלי והכלי שמו נטלא בלשון תלמוד. אבודרהם:‏ That is, that ...


8

One justification given by Rabbi Shmuel Wosner (Shevet HaLevi 4:23) is that nowadays Mayim Achronim is only a chumra and it was not one that women accepted. [This reminds me of what some say to justify women's not davening maariv.]


7

The basic idea is that the first splash of water becomes tamei from touching your hands (since they themselves are deemed tamei - that's the reason we have to wash in the first place); the second splash, then, makes the water left on your hands tahor. If your hands were dirty, you actually need three splashes: one to remove the dirt, and the second and third ...


7

The general rule with berachot is safek berachot l'hakel- in a case where we are not sure whether we make a beracha we err to the side of not making another one. This is a subset of the general rule of safek d'rabanan l'kulah (we are lenient about doubts which occur on mitzvos from the Rabbis.) The exceptions are berachot that are d'orayta "from the Torah" ...


7

I'll ask it even stronger: What if someone is feeding you and you have no intention of using your hands to interact with the food at all? Well, the Shulchan Aruch rules in OC 163:2 that in such a case, only the one eating must wash his hands and not the one feeding. He doesn't mention that one would not say a bracha and the implication is that it's the same ...


7

See here, One may dry his hands on a towel and then use the damp towel to clean his eyes and face, as the towel isn’t wet enough to impart enough water to wet something else (tofach al menat le-hatpiach) (Shulchan Arukh 554:11). (If one must actually clean one’s eyes in the morning, it is permitted to do so normally, as it is no different than ...


6

One should not be quick to assume that one should make a new "al netilas yadayim". Although MB says in BH that one should, and Aruch Hashulhan says that no one would say that you should not say the bracha if you defecated, he must have missed the Taz (and the Maharshal) who brings a proof from the Rema that the opinion of the Maharshal to not make a new ...


6

See Halachically Speaking Volume 3 Issue 4 (page 4): Although some poskim say one should wash his hands, the minhag is that one does not have to wash his hands in this situation. The reason is because since that part of the arm is revealed when putting on tefillin it is not considered a place which is normally covered. See there for sources...


6

From here: The primary reason for requiring this washing is that in times of old (and again shortly when Mashiach arrives) before Kohanim were allowed to partake of Terumah they had to wash their hands to ensure they weren't impure. In order for them to get in the habit of doing so, the Chazal instituted this washing for all of Klal Yisroel, not just for ...


6

The Derisha (OC 181 sk 2) writes that the obligation to wash with water only applies to Biblically ordained blessings such as Brikat HaMazon and does not apply to rabbinic blessings. (He doesn't mention if this rule would apply to Birkot HaTorah according to the opinions that they too are Biblically ordained.) Even so, the Mishnah Berurah (OC 181 sk 23) ...


6

It's not a matter of a chatzitzah - anything liquid wouldn't be a chatzitzah, because the water will wash it away (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 161:2). It's rather that the water from the first washing becomes tamei by touching your hands (which themselves are tamei - that's why you have to wash them), and the second washing then renders the hands, and the ...


6

No. The Kaf HaHaim 181:10 rules that one isn't required to use a Keli that is proper for Netilat Yadayim (see Levush and Kol Bo Siman 23).


5

I know that I have a minhag from my grandparents in Russia, that they would wash and dry their hands before ritual washing. The reason is, that if one's hands were dirty, it would create a chatzitzah (barrier) between one's skin and the water being poured. That is why they would wash their hands. As for drying them before washing netilas yadayim, perhaps ...


5

See this OU article on Mayim Achronim: According to the kabbalistic interpretation of the Kaf HaChayim Soffer, mayim achronim is an “offering” to the sitra achra—the “other side”[20] —and therefore, must be removed. (This notion of the sitra achra is also mentioned by Rav Palache in the name of the Yalkut Reuvani, who states that Iyov (Job) suffered ...


5

To build upon JXG's answer, the Halachah is clearly that you are not allowed to speak unnecessarily in between Berachoth and that for which the Berachah was recited. On the other hand, one may speak in between two separate actions that each have their Berachoth, even if one action is related to the other and speaking is to be limited. Case #1: Like most ...


5

The Aruch haShulchan 158:1-2 brings the 2 main reasons: To protect against defiling Teruma (on a rabbinical level), we are careful to wash for regular food as well. Cleanliness leads a person to purity and holiness. Based on where the Torah says "v'hiskadishchem"- sanctify yourselves (Vayikra 11:44), we wash our hands and dry them prior to eating. There ...


5

If he washed his hands that morning and knows definitely that he hasn't touched any unclean parts of his body, then he can get away without another washing, if there is indeed no water available (Mishnah Berurah 128:20 citing Rambam). Otherwise, though, he does need to wash, and can't do birkas kohanim otherwise (R' Yehoshua ben Levi in Sotah 39a; Shulchan ...


5

The Aruch haShulchan (163) sums it up nicely: Chazal permitted Terumah eaters to eat without washing by merely covering their hands (because they were zerizim and would be careful to not touch the terumah). They did not permit this for people who ate their food in taharah. The Rambam limits the restriction to those who were careful about taharah, but for ...


5

Please refer to the final halacha in b'tzias hapas. The Shulchan Aruch rules that pashtida (dough filled with various fillings including meat, fish or cheese) is hamotzi even as a snack. The Mishna Berurah distinguishes this from pas haba'a b'kisnin in that the latter is mainly baked as a treat whereas pashtida is eaten for satiation. He says it's no ...


5

One who has a bandage on his hand which is not easily removable should wash as much of his hand as possible (even if that amount zero) and take care that any skin which could not be washed not directly touch the bread. Source: Shulchan Aruch OC 162:10, Magen Avraham sk 18, Mishna Brurah sk 68 and particularly 69 It would seem that the appropriate blessing ...


5

Dipping a hand in a kosher Mikva is good enough to eat bread with it, for if a Mikva can purify whole bodies then how much more so can it purify hands. (eg. Rambam Brachot 6:5, Shulchan Aruch OC 159:14) There is a split amongst Rishonim if the correct blessing to recite is the usual blessing before hand washing (Al Netilat Yadayim "on taking [a cup to wash] ...


4

The Shulchan Aruch O.C. 4:18 brings a mixed list of things that require "washing". Some require water for Ruach Raa, others for cleanliness preceding davening, etc. The S.A. there brings an opinion to wash after walking among the dead (a cemetery). The Mishna Berura there (39) says that the only area that absolutely requires 3x/hand is when one wakes up, ...


4

Simple answer no. Complex answer, there is a mahloket as to exactly why we wash our hands in the morning. Some hold that is is because we have touched an unclean part of the body, some hold that is is because of a ruah ra that rests upon a person while they are asleep, some hold that is not a ruah ra but rather klipot or hiztoniut that rest upon a person ...



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