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Tallis -- this is easy. The halachic default is that everyone 13 and up should be wearing a Tallis; Ashkenazi never-married-men happen to have a custom otherwise. (Rabbi Meiselman, for instance, feels this whole custom is in error and his unmarried sons wear tallisos.) In absence of such a custom, we default to the standard -- wear a Tallis. Hair covering ...


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Rashi to the cited verse: לא יחיה: ומאותה קללה מתה רחל בדרך Shall not live: and from that curse Rachel died on the road. So it seems that it was a curse.


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By making the neder to bring a mincha with barley when he knows it is not possible, this person is making a neder in vain – a neder shov. From INSIGHTS INTO THE DAILY DAF Nedarim 15 I see that The RAN (end of Nedarim 14b) writes that there is no Isur of "Neder Shav," a Neder made in vain, as there is an Isur of Shevu'as Shav, a Shevu'ah made in ...


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I hereby nullify any expression of intent or condition or disclaimer, and disclaimers that result from my disclaimers (lit. that come out from within) ad infinatum, and invalidate any witnesses of my disclaimer against the vow that I am about to make. It is a declaration discounting any attempt to invalidate a vow, in order to make the vow absolutely ...


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Excellent question. Back in an agricultural society, people had animals around. So he was thinking it would be a cow, sheep, or goat. Nonetheless, the Talmud said he should not have taken that oath -- what if it was a horse or donkey? (Which can't be used as a sacrifice.) Some Christians took this story as a message "oh, always fulfill your oaths." The ...


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There are two different issues. 1. Using a specific name of Gd when swearing an oath which is not allowed. 2. Showing respect to any divine name. This link here, will fully explain the how and why of writing Gd's name. But the short version, is that writing Gd or G-d is in order to show respect to Gd and to not cause the name to be erased, or treated ...


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According to the expalanation in this article, yes, he does have to refrain unless annuled based on the notion that he made the vow unwittingly.


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Generally, a promise must be kept (and a promise to give charity is effective when taken using lesser methods than a standard promise), and for that reason we avoid promising. There are ways to annul promises: one must go to someone who knows the rules of such annulments (so go to your rabbi!), and he will determine whether it can be annulled. In brief, a ...



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