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25

Maimonides describes the qualifications of a Jewish prophet. He also describes how to discern a prophet who appears to meet the qualifications, but still is shown to not be an authentic prophet. Among them: Therefore, if a prophet arises and attempts to dispute Moses' prophecy by performing great signs and wonders, we should not listen to him. We know ...


22

There is a tradition, recorded in various sources, that the prophet Ovadiah was an Edomite convert. This tradition is born of the fact that there is nothing within his short (one chapter) oracle that concerns Judeans or Israelites; the entire thing is an oracle about the Edomites instead. Sources: Sanhedrin 39b; Tanchuma, Tazria 8. See also Rashi and ...


14

Indeed, a keen observation. This observation is made as well by Abarbanel and Malbim, who both explain that the first time, Shmuel ran to Eli, as he was Eli's servant and he was motivated to serve him properly. However, when he went to Eli, and it turned out Eli had never called him in the first place, he was a bit embarrassed. So the second time, he was ...


13

Whether or not David was a navi seems be an age-old discussion among Jewish authorities. On the one hand, there seem to be many futuristic concepts throughout Tehillim, especially about the destruction of the Temple and the eventual redemption. Assuming that David was the author of at least most of the psalms would imply that he had at least some form of ...


12

Typical navi: sees prophetic visions only in a dream state (Rambam, Hil. Yesodei Hatorah 7:2) becomes terrified and physically weak from the experience (ibid.) sees a metaphorical vision, from which he or she then deduces the actual meaning (ibid. 7:3). This is because their prophecy comes to them via an angel (ibid. 7:6) - or as the Gemara puts it ...


12

The relevant verse is I Chron. 22:8, where David quotes G-d as having told him: "You have spilled much blood, and waged great wars." Radak there explains that "much blood" refers to people whose deaths David caused indirectly but who didn't deserve this - such as Uriah, the kohanim of Nov, and non-Jewish civilians caught in the crossfire during his raids ...


12

Rabbi Amnon Bazak explains in his lecture that this seemingly useless act of telling David in a secret way to run away and then meeting David in person shows the special and unique relationship between David and Yonatan. After Yonatan uses the arrows to send his message he is overcome with love for David and therefore risks his life to see David and embrace ...


12

Radak (to vv. 20 and 36) and Ralbag (to v. 37) seem to take a bit of a different tack than the answer given by morah hochman. They say that indeed Yonasan at first figured that he won't be able to speak with David in person because there might be people around, and therefore he'd have to use the signals. Once he saw (after he was done with those) that indeed ...


12

In general, it seems the prophet would fall into a prophetic state, so it would be clear that it wasn't just a random voice speaking to him. See, for example, Berishis 15 where God appears to Avraham first in "a vision", and then in "a deep sleep... a dread, a great darkness". However, it seems that sometimes Nevuah sounded just like a person's voice, and ...


12

Assuming we use the conventional Jewish chronology, that puts us right during the Babylonian exile. 2414 years ago = 400 BCE; conventional chronology has the first Temple destroyed 20 years earlier and rebuilt 50 years later. (The secular sources have a missing century or so, which would put this instead in early Second Temple years, but that's for another ...


11

There are many reasons why Muhammad could not have been a true prophet, according to Jewish belief. I'll summarize at the top of this answer and then drill down into particulars. Because of Bilaam's wickedness, as emblematic of the wickedness of gentile prophets, God removed prophecy from the gentiles (Midrash Tanchuma, Balak, siman 1). Muhammad was born ...


10

We find in Yonah's prayer inside the fish: וַיִּתְפַּלֵּל יוֹנָה אֶל יְהוָה אֱלֹהָיו מִמְּעֵי הַדָּגָה. וַיֹּאמֶר קָרָאתִי מִצָּרָה לִי אֶל יְהוָה וַיַּעֲנֵנִי מִבֶּטֶן שְׁאוֹל שִׁוַּעְתִּי שָׁמַעְתָּ קוֹלִי And Jonah prayed to the Lord his God, from the belly of the fish. And he said: I called out from my distress to the Lord, and He answered me; ...


10

Yonah was a navi who was living in the kingdom of Israel before its exile by Sancheriv. God told him to go to Ninveh, which was in Ashur. In general, God is not concerned enough with the affairs of non jewish nations to send them messages through a navi to repent, which is why they don't have their own prophets to begin with. Yonah concluded that their ...


10

The Talmud (Megillah 14a) writes: הרבה נביאים עמדו להם לישראל, כפלים כיוצאי מצרים, אלא, נבואה שהוצרכה לדורות - נכתבה, ושלא הוצרכה - לא נכתבה.‏ Many prophets arose for the Jews: more than twice the number of Jews in the Exodus [1200000, but this language is likely meant to be understood as a really, really big number]. However, those prophesies ...


9

A large part of Shimon lived in Yehudah's boundaries, true (as described in Josh. 19:1-9). But in I Chron. 4:31, after (more-or-less) the same list of cities is repeated, the verse adds a crucial detail: "These were their cities until the reign of David." Pseudo-Rashi and Metzudas David explain that in this period the Tribe of Yehudah's population increased ...


9

When a scribe writes a full Tanach on a scroll, he leaves 4 blank lines between books of the Torah and 3 blank lines between books on Nevi'im including between books of Trei Asar. (Rambam Sefer Torah 7:15, Shulchan Aruch YD 283:1, and I have seen this done when laining a haftorah from a Trei Asar scroll.) The Mishna Berurah 144 sk 9 quotes an opinion that ...


8

The Gemara in Nedarim says that had the Jews not sinned, they would have just received the 5 book of the Torah and sefer Yehoshua: אלמלא (לא ) חטאו ישראל לא ניתן להם אלא חמשה חומשי תורה וספר יהושע בלבד שערכה של ארץ ישראל הוא מאי טעמא כי ברוב חכמה רב כעס The ran explains that the main purpose of divrei neviim was to rebuke the Jews for their sins: ...


8

Without getting into a distinction between magic and miracles (because in the end both are supernatural) the halacha (Yoreh Deah 179) states that all forms of k'shuf are forbidden except those performed through Sefer Yetzeirah. The Beis Yosef and others explain that the general principle is that the Sefer Yetzeirah discusses the use of combinations of ...


8

According to R. Yehudah Halevi, a convert cannot be a prophet. The question on R. Yehudah Halevi's view is that Chazal say Ovadiah was a convert. This question, which was raised by the commentators on the Kuzari, is addressed by R. Yitzchak Sheilat who suggests that R. Yehudah Halevi's view depends on a possible dispute in the Gemara about whether Ovadiah ...


8

If you look at the context in the passage, it doesn't appear to be speaking of a single prophet but instead of something that God would do many times through history. 18:10-11 speaks of the option to use divination and other kinds of magic to find things out, but verse 13 says the nation with whom God made a covenant should be wholeheartedly devoted to Him; ...


7

First you must define what it means that "the Torah cannot change" and what it means that Neviim and Kesuvim are "עתידין ליבטל". That the Torah cannot change is the ninth of the Rambam's thirteen ikkarim. He defines it as the belief that no mitzvos can be added to nor subtracted from the Torah, nor can there be any "new" or "alternative" Torah. Now, what ...


7

Abarbanel discusses why all nevuos, including those of Yeshayahu, Yirmiyahu, etc., are not written in their historical context in Melachim or elsewhere. For that matter, why a separate book for Tehillim and Mishlei? Why not just include them with the stories of David and Shlomo? I will not post his entire discussion here, but the gist of it is twofold: It ...


7

According to Abarbanel, the several prophecies in Chapters 29-32 of Ezekiel are all concerning the future of Egypt (the future from Ezekiel's perspective), but they will not all happen at the same time. The first prophecies were realized during the reign of Nebuchadnezzar and his conquering Egypt, and the later prophecies will be realized before the coming ...


7

Per the Tshuvos V'Hanhogos 1 Chapter 300 you can make a Siyum on Yona for example if necessary. This proves that each one of the Trei Asar is a seperate entity. אבל בשעת הדחק שאינו מוצא סעודת מצוה בסיום מסכתא יש להקל שילמוד אז עם רש"י ספר נביא כגון : יונה , או מגילת שיר השירים, או מגילת אסתר , וכדומה עם רש"י ומספיק


7

This is discussed, of course, by Abarbanel, first thing in Sefer Shmuel. An initial glance at the names of the books of Tanach shows us that the books are not necessarily named for their authors, especially in this case being that Shmuel clearly did not author a large portion of Sefer Shmuel. Rather, books are named for their content. There are two ways to ...


6

Rambam (Hil. Yesodei Hatorah ch. 7) describes the prerequisites that a person needs in order to be a navi. To put it in contemporary terms, these are needed so that his mind is "tuned to the correct frequency" on which to receive Hashem's word. The average person has not reached this level - they would no more be able to receive such a transmission than a ...


6

Jeremiah 28:8--9 ח הַנְּבִיאִים, אֲשֶׁר הָיוּ לְפָנַי וּלְפָנֶיךָ--מִן-הָעוֹלָם: וַיִּנָּבְאוּ אֶל-אֲרָצוֹת רַבּוֹת, וְעַל-מַמְלָכוֹת גְּדֹלוֹת, לְמִלְחָמָה, וּלְרָעָה וּלְדָבֶר. ט הַנָּבִיא, אֲשֶׁר יִנָּבֵא לְשָׁלוֹם--בְּבֹא, דְּבַר הַנָּבִיא, יִוָּדַע הַנָּבִיא, אֲשֶׁר-שְׁלָחוֹ יְהוָה בֶּאֱמֶת. י And see context in the preceding above verses. ...


6

Gen. 1:5 states: ויקרא א-להים לאור יום, ולחשך קרא לילה "G-d called the light 'day', and the darkness He called 'night.'" So the name of Hashem is omitted in the second half of the verse. This leads R. Elazar to comment (Bereishis Rabbah 3:6) that "G-d does not associate His name with evil, only with good."


6

I heard an innovative explanation from Rav Meir Spiegelman. Yonah doesn't run away to get to a different place; Yonah sets sail in order to be at sea, and there is no prophecy at sea. This is related to the idea that the sea is too different from the earth to be involved in earth-based things (e.g. fish are created from the water, but animals from the ...


6

There are three main differences between Magic and Miracles. A miracle is a request to Hashem that is then granted, but it may not always be granted. While Magic is an attempt to subvert the will of Hashem and presumably is reliable. The ability of magic is limited. It can not create new things, can not raise the dead, and if it passes over fresh water it ...



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