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According to the Schottenstein Edition of Berachos, 26b2 note 24, "the earlier portion, called mincha gedola, "greater minchah" [because the greater portion of the day remains -- see Perishah, Orach Chaim 232:5], and the latter portion, known as minchah ketana, "lesser minchah" [because only a small portion of the day remains]." The gemara there (as noted ...


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Mincha Gedola is three hours long thus it is the big Mincha. Mincha Ketana is 2 1/2 hours long thus it is the small Mincha. Regarding Plag Hamincha it is the time in between Mincha Ketana and Shekiya, which is half of the time of the Mincha remaining. It does not mean the half time between the two Minchas as there is no Halachic significance to that time. ...


3

from Menachem Mendel: The earliest apparent source for using the term ḥallah in connection with the bread that is eaten on Shabbat can be found in the 15th c. German work Leket Yosher (p. 49) [See John Cooper’s Eat and Be Satisfied: A Social History of Jewish Food]: וזכורני שבכל ע”ש עושין לו ג’ חלות דקות הנילושות בביצים ושמן ומעט מים. וחלה ...


2

The names of the months came up with them from Bavel. Talmud Yerushalmi Rosh Hashana perek one, halacha two. This Yerushalmi is mentioned in Tosafos Rosh Hashana 7a, d.h. Midivrei. Most of the names are mentioned in megilas Esther and Nechemia. We can estimate then, at least to the latest possible date, based on Achashveirosh's reign. Wiki states ...


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The original Hebrew months were numbered only. During the Babylonian exile (around 400CE), the Jew began to use names. See http://www.aish.com/atr/Names_of_Hebrew_Months.html


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The other answers seems interesting. However, IIRC, we were advised NOT to name our 1st born son until the brit which was about 4 months after he was born. (Yes, he was a "miracle" baby who's now a miracle adult. Father's biased love, no?? I'm allowed!) The only ones confused by our policy were the non-Jewish hospital doctors and nurses. For "Mi Sheberach", ...


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Sefer Asia - page 244 and page 245 brings different stories quoted by Rabbi Chaim Miller of such situations. Amongst those quoted that urged giving a name prior to a Bris in order to be able to have a name to Daven for were Rabbi Yechezkel Levenstein Zatzal, The Ozorover Rabbi Zatzal, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein Zatzal, Rabbi Eliezer Man Shach Zatzal, and the ...


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The reason we why we wait till the bris is to copy Hashem who gave a new name to Avraham Avinu. But technically even on the first day it is permitted


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This circumstance happened to a family in my community. The baby was born with a health problem that required deferring the bris for 6 months. Their rabbi told them to name the baby following the same procedure that is followed for baby girls, simply replacing feminine pronouns in the mi shebeirach with masculine ones.


0

Eden refers to pleasure as the Path of the Just writes: "Our Sages of blessed memory have taught us that man was created for the sole purpose of rejoicing in God and deriving pleasure from the splendor of His Presence; for this is true joy and the greatest of pleasures (Edens) that can be found"


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R. Aryeh Kaplan's commentary on the verse (2:8), from The Living Torah, states that Eden means "Delight in Hebrew." The Meam Lo'ez (which Kaplan helped translate from the Ladino) explains that "the Torah informs us that God planted a delightful place in the east." The latest edition of the Encyclopedia Judaica essentially states this as well. It discusses ...


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The fact that no-one associates the name of the Greek goddess of victory with it's pagan origins is precisely the reason Rabbi Yisroel Belsky told me not to worry about the apparel company named after her. He added there is room to be stringent if you really want to, just don't make yourself or others crazy.


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It seems that perhaps this developed as a minhag or may have something to do with kabbaloh as the yud and vav lettering does not appear in Tanach (as a word unto itself). There are rishonim, most notably Rashi who in various places do actually use the yud and vav abbreviation, and not the tes and zion abbreviation. It may also have to do with using letters ...


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If you don't know his mother's name, you can use his father's name (Aruch Hashulchan 119:1, Orchos Rabeinu Vol 1, p 64). If you don't know his mother or father's name, you can use the surname (family name) (R' Chaim Kanievsky in Ishei Yisrael p734). If you don't know the person's proper Hebrew name, you can use an English name or a nickname that resembles ...



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