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4

You ask here how to change a name, related MY questions address the questions of whether it is permitted and to what name change to it. Today to change one's name one goes to a rav (rabbi) although chabad.org says this is only to change the first and main name, otherwise anyone can add a name. It describes the process as follows When changing a ...


3

Josephus transliterates the name as Ἀσαμωναίος. The transliterated form ω corresponds to long o (see Brønno, "Some nominal types in the Septuagint" in Classica et Mediaevalia 3 and Studien über Hebräische Morphologie und Vokalismus auf Grundlage der Mercatischen Fragmente der zweiten Kolumne der Hexapla des Origines). For example, יוֹנָתָן is transliterated ...


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When we wrote the soc.culture.jewish FAQ we dealt with this question as follows. Note that one of the students who had been in the class at the time that Rav Soloveitchik wrote the name "God" and erased it verified that the story is true. Writing: Why do some people write "G-d" with a hyphen instead of an `o'? Answer: Based on the words in ...


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From this page: The adjective "Ashkenazic" and corresponding nouns, Ashkenazi (singular) and Ashkenazim (plural) are derived from the Hebrew word "Ashkenaz," which is used to refer to Germany. ...I searched the literature for confirmation and found there were two camps: (1) (Opinions which agree with the above): Dovid Katz, Yiddish and Power ...


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Here are just a few possibilities in Hebrew (I don't speak Hebrew, so please forgive me--and let me know--if some are way off): אגודת - Indeed used with this meaning ציבור -? עם (Not the best) יהדות--Roughly "Jewry" (countable)--In frequent use with this meaning--see here קהילה ממוצא -- In frequent use, but lacks the sought degree of precision בית, ...


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I don't think there is one right answer, here are a few possibilities you could pick from ethnicities ethnic groups (e.g., here) ethnic divisions (e.g., Wikipedia uses it here and here) communities (also here and here) origins subcultures (e.g., here) traditions


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To look or regard. See: A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Hebrew Language for Readers of English p. 401, 1987 by R. Ernest Klein


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Perhaps seeng or looking. See here on Radak and R. Yona Ibn G'anach here



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