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5

In the introduction to טור חושן משפט (Tur Choshen Mishpat), it says: והטור השלישי אבן העזר שם עשיתי לאדם עזר כנגדו גם כשלחה גרש איך יגרשנה מנגדו וקראתיו אבן העזר יען כי הוא להועיל גם לעזר:‏ In my translation: And the third column 'Even ha-'Ezer, there I made for man a help opposite him (based on Bereshit 2:18), and as he might send her, how he ...


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Even Ha'Ezer contains halachot about "דיני אישות", so it would seem that the name is a play on words from "אעשה לו עזר כנגדו" which describes Hashem's creation of Chava (and women in general). The phrase itself is mentioned twice in Shmuel 1 (4, 1 and 7, 12). It is indeed a "stone of help" - that's how Shmuel called it to signify "עד הנה עזרנו ה'", "until ...


1

In Mas. Shabbos on daf 118b it says: Reb Yossi never called his wife "wife". He called her "my house". From this gemora I think it's the minhag not to call the wife by her name. אמר רבי יוסי: מימי לא קריתי לאשתי אשתי ולשורי שורי אלא לאשתי ביתי ולשורי שדי


1

It’s basically chazal’s version of The Praises. It is a way to distinguish it from random praises. It is a formal noun. Another example is that Teffilin is called teffilin to make it a formal noun, and to distinguish it from tefillot.


2

I'll add that the Ben Ish Chai gave two reasons: Everything Yaakov said was said in ruach hakodesh, so he was required to speak in a very exact way, it wasn't just his own free way of speaking. Yaakov did say something like "my great, honored, father, teacher, etc.", but the Torah puts it down eventually as what is needed for future generations, in a ...


3

From here, it seems there may only (?!) be that verse from Psalms (7:3): פן יטרף כאריה נפשי פרק ואין מציל If you're okay with the last word beginning with a ל (rather than ending with one), you could also use from אשת חיל (cited here): פיה פתחה בחכמה ותורת חסד על לשונה Or, if you're also okay with it being a quote from the Shabbat prayer service ...


1

The Gemara in Yoma 38b says: מאי ושם רשעים ירקב? אמר ר' אלעזר רקביבות תעלה בשמותן דלא מסקינן בשמייהו What is the meaning of ‘But the name of the wicked shall rot’? — R. Eleazar said: Rottenness enters their names, none name their children after them. Rashi comments: דלא מסקי בשמייהו - לא יקרא אדם לבנו שם אדם רשע, one should not name his son ...


7

In the introduction of the Chovot Halevavot published by Mosad Harav Kook, he brings that it is not known how to pronounce the name. He says that Ashkenazim pronounce it Bechaye, and Sefardim pronounce it Bachye. See there for some other opinions and rationals as well.


7

R. Reuven Margalios in his פנינים ומרגליות has a note on this name. His theory is that it is not an actual name, but a nickname which means "may he live long," like the (Yiddish) name "Alter." He proves that it is not a real name because in a manuscript of Kad ha-Kemach, the author is listed as R. Yehuda. According to this, it would presumably be pronounced ...


1

I heard Rabbi Yitzhak Yosef and his father Rav Ovadia z'l pronounce it "Maharatz Hauyt"


2

Rabbi Chaim Kanievsky is known for saying (as brought in ויקרא שמו בישראל) that certain "modern" names, such as Shira, are "not real names" and people with such names should have their names changed. Don't ask me how he deals with his own name (which also doesn't appear anywhere in the Torah as a name)! By no means is his 'Psak' universal, however ...



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