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Incredible i just was looking into this! It would seem to be that there is no issue saying Christ 1) Like you pointed out all it means is anointed. and being that it has a definition, we don't care if the connotation was changed throughout the generations, as per the sources the Gr"a brings (Mordechai, Hagahos Maamonis, Yereiym etc.) 2) It's not a name, ...


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The Torah clearly explains why Chava chose this name for her oldest kid: וְהָאָדָם יָדַע אֶת חַוָּה אִשְׁתּוֹ וַתַּהַר וַתֵּלֶד אֶת קַיִן וַתֹּאמֶר קָנִיתִי אִישׁ אֶת ה' ‏ "Chaya gave birth and called him Cain; [Hebrew for] I have created [Konithi] a person with Gcd". Why would you think it's plausible that Chava named him something else? What ...


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…that Qayin derived from the 1st millenium BC South Arabic word Qyn, and that Cain is not a name old enough in Bible times of the 2nd millenium. Is it plausible that this is in fact a correct approach? No, it's implausible, as Cain lived well before that and even the Torah that mentions him was given us before that.


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Wikipedia states: Traditionally, the favoured derivation of the name "Eden" was from the Akkadian edinnu, derived from a Sumerian word meaning "plain" or "steppe". Eden is now believed to be more closely related to an Aramaic root word meaning "fruitful, well-watered." The Hebrew term is translated "pleasure" in Sarah's secret saying in Genesis ...


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There are people who don't like saying "Christ", and therefore don't like saying "Christmas." If you don't have a strong secular education, you'd assume that "X" just means "fill-in-the-blank", so "X-mas" sounds like a more "kosher" way to refer to the holiday. (This is what my camp counselors did when I was a kid, and that was their explanation.) As Ze'ev ...


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The word Christ comes from the Greek Χριστός, and the initial letters, ΧΡ (chi rho), was a common abbreviation in handwritten manuscripts and a symbol for Christianity. The English Xmas as an abbreviation of Christmas is long-attested: Xres mæsse appears in the "Anglo-Saxon Chronicle" (c.1100). At some point in English the r was dropped from the ...


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I think there is a theme in the naming of Leah's and Rachel's children which follows a broader motif. Rachel desires nothing more than to have children, and that is withheld from her. She names her child accordingly, that she should have another child. Her naming the children of Bilhah also follow this theme - the names have to do with having children. ...


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Ofer's answer mentions that the Bar Ilan program has the complete list. However, this program is costly, and I don't think that most people have it. This functionality is also found in the free Torat Emet program, under the tab "שונות" ("Miscellaneous"), as shown below:


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Got this partial answer from Rabbi David Wolpe: "I have always heard that while there is no limit to personal prayers, a mi sheberach should be for four weeks unless requested longer. But I know of many that have gone longer, so there probably isn’t a prohibition." This at least answers the question about the upper bound and highlights some distinction ...


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Excerpt from this The use of words and names like “Shmuel,” “Yeshaya,” and “Daniel” are permitted, even though two of their letters represent Hashem’s name, since the intended use is for a person’s name, not Hashem’s name. The word “Bethel” can be written, as well as Beth-El in two words. Since it is the name of a city, it does not matter how it ...


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Hadassah it's a name with 11 variant depending where you are in the world: Astera, Asti, Astra, Estella, Esther, Etoile, Hadassah( Bride, star, Queen), Hester, Stella. She knew her destiny, She was not supposed to pass there as "slave Jewish girl- Hadassah". The covenant of God with them in that time demanded that Her name be translated in Greek in order for ...


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The Rashbam on that verse says that he is actually named after the prior verse (30:23) - G-d has taken away my reproach., but she changes the Alef to a Yud to ask for another son. So the main name is about taking away the negativity of not having any children, but one letter is changed in order to add the request for a second son as an addition. In Chabad ...


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The name Yosef as it relates to his being nothing more than an enabler to his brother's existence is actually quite personal and telling. His youth was spent caring for his brothers. We see he put himself in danger to go check on his brothers at his father's request. And most importantly we find him caring for and providing for his brothers in Mitzrayim. ...


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See the previous pasuk (30:23): וַתַּ֖הַר וַתֵּ֣לֶד בֵּ֑ן וַתֹּ֕אמֶר אָסַ֥ף אֱלֹהִ֖ים אֶת־חֶרְפָּתִֽי׃ There's another word there with the same root, אסף. This phrase is more in line with what how others named their children, after some event that happened with their birth. Here, the event was "‘God hath taken away my reproach.’". Source: I heard this ...


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I would like to propose the possibility that the angel with which Jacob wrestled is actually a proxy for G-d himself. As evidence that angels can be a proxy for G-d, consider the first few verses of Parasha Vayeira (Genesis 18). It states that Hashem appeared to Abraham, but in the next verse Abraham lifted his eyes and saw three men (angels). For Abraham ...


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Sholom Mordechai Hakohen Schwadron (Hebrew: הרב שלום מרדכי הכהן שבדרון‎) (1912–21 December 1997) edited and published two famous mussar texts composed by his teachers — Ohr Yahel by Rabbi Leib Chasman and Lev Eliyahu by Rabbi Elyah Lopian. Our Rav quoted Rav Chasman as having stated that the malach was stating that this is his name. When an enemy general ...


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Sholom Mordechai Hakohen Schwadron (Hebrew: הרב שלום מרדכי הכהן שבדרון‎) (1912–21 December 1997) edited and published two famous mussar texts composed by his teachers — Ohr Yahel by Rabbi Leib Chasman and Lev Eliyahu by Rabbi Elyah Lopian. Our Rav quoted Rav Chasman as having stated that the malach was stating that this is his name. When an enemy general ...


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He may be thinking of Bamidbar Raba, Naso 10:5, but that's about a different angel, the one that came to Manoach's wife. It says: והוא פלאי שם שמו המלאך פלאי "it's פלאי" - the angel set his name as פלאי (translation according to the Mat'nos K'huna)


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The Ohr HaChaim writes that since Ya’akov said “Tell me your name now” because he knew that angels have no permanent name and for this reason when he asked the angel his name he explained that he wished to know the angel’s name at the current moment, to this the angel responded “Why this?” - why do you ask me my name with this explanation (that you want to ...


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The seffer Shaarei Aharon in Vayeira 19 37 offers an explenation to the discrepancy between referring to Moav the same term as the previous passuk whereas bnei Amon is different then Ben Ami. He says 'the way that a person wants to go, he is taken. Therefore, the younger daughter who tried to conceal the matter (the name Amon is less obvious to have been ...


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The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains that every event in the parsha represents the triumph of Sarah's view and approach. First, the purchase of Ma'aras HaMachepeilah shows the actualization of G-d's promise in the world. She passed away unable to take the news that Yitzchak was almost sacrificed because her focus was on serving G-d within the world, not negating ...


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msh210 is correct but... al pi drush one can say the main part of the parsha revolved around Yitzchok's finding a wife. This happened in large part as his emotional replacement for his mother as the Torah attests at the end of chapter 24 'and Yitzchok was comforted after his mother'. Another point is kabbalisticaly speaking, as brought in Chida and others ...


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Like the colloquial name of every other parasha, Chaye Sara's comes from its initial words.


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The Aruch Hashulchan In Even Haezer 129 which discusses the names and spellings has this name by the letter ח and he goes through the spelling,and the name itself.


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Although it is not a common name, even in the Talmud, it is mentioned in Oholei Shem under כלאוונא where he says look at חלוונא. Looking further in Oholei Shem I can not find חלוונא. However in Kuntras Hasheimos Hachadash - note 13 & 14 he mentions a connection to Lapidus and Saadya. The name does exist as you can see from this Lzecher Nishmas.


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This appears in the Talmud in Nazir 7a. It is a combination of two word, כל meaning all or each and אוונא which means a region or section of land. It appears in a very technical discussion about taking a Nazarite vow which was given a term equivalent to a distance to another location. The term אוונא refers to a standard for measuring land. From the ...


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The following only addresses the absence of his name in Parshas Chayei Sarah, but that is the bulk of cases in which his name is replaced with eved/ish. R' Yaakov Kaminetzky (Emes L'Yaakov Bereishis 24:39) sees in this point an important motif underlying the story of Eliezer's search for a wife for Yitzchok. Eliezer had a daughter whom he wanted to marry ...



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