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18

Pischei Teshuvah (Yoreh De'ah 265:6) cites the opinion of Mabit, that it is best not to use names of people from before Avraham. There are indeed opposing opinions cited in PT there, and after all we see that Noach is used often enough; but this may have reduced the use of the name Adam. It's also possible that it had to do with it being commonly used as a ...


17

Because "Alfasi" is really "al-Fasi". "Al-Fasi" is Arabic for "the Fezite" (Fez being the city in Morocco where he lived). So kind of like how the word "of" gets swallowed in "USA", the word "the" got swallowed in "Rif". Wouldn't have made much sense to make his acronym stand for "Rabbi Yitzchak The".


15

The Zohar (Bereishis 84a, citing Psalms 86:16, "והושיעה לבן אמתך") says that it's better to pray using the most definite facts available. There can be a slight chance that the sick person isn't really the son of the man who is assumed to be his father (even though, for halachic purposes, we ignore this possibility and follow the majority - Chullin 11b), but ...


15

In a sense it goes back at least to the Gemara. R' Sherira Gaon points out that the names of some Amoraim that begin with ר (for example: Rabbah, Rava, Rafram) are actually shortened forms of "Rav" plus their personal name: רב+אבא=רבה (or רבא); similarly רב+אפרים=רפרם; and so forth. Also "Reish" (Lakish) is a similar short form for רבי שמעון.


15

עתניאל בן קנז ועכסה בת כלב — see Judges 1:13 EDIT: I found some more: יואש מלך יהודה ויהועדן - See Kings II 14:2 אחז מלך יהודה ואבי בת-זכריה - See Kings II 18:2 חזקיהו מלך יהודה וחפצי-בה - See Kings II 21:1 מנשה מלך יהודה ומשלמת בת חרוץ - See Kings II 21:19


15

In the Shul I daven in the Gabbai's father Davens there often and the Rav told him to call him up Yaamod Avi Mori. I found that Sefer Dinei Kriyas HaTorah - Rabbi Naftali Hoffner says that you should call the father up as Yaamod Avi U'Mori........


14

For plenty of good Jews, their English name is the English cognate of their Hebrew name (Solomon/Shlomo, Avraham/Abraham, etc.). The letterhead of ultra-right-wing Rabbi Yoel Teitelbaum of Satmar read "Joel Teitelbaum." If someone is Solomon/Shlomo, no matter which they go by, that just goes into a Halachic document as "Shlomo"; Solomon doesn't even need ...


14

Megillas Antiochus lists five sons of Matisyahu: Yehudah, Shimon, Yochanan, Yonasan, and Elazar. I Maccabees has the same names, but in rearranged order: Yochanan, Shimon, Yehudah, Elazar, and Yonasan. (It also gives their respective nicknames or cognomens: respectively, Gaddi, Thassi, Maccabeus, Avaran and Apphus.) Rashi (to Deut. 33:11) mentions "twelve ...


14

According to Radak (Yehoshua 1:1), this is grammatically proper for "ben" to become "bin" when it and the following word are small and connected together in speech. Other examples where "ben" becomes "bin": דִּבְרֵי אָגוּר בִּן יָקֶה הַמַּשָּׂא (Mishlei 30:1) וְהָיָה אִם בִּן הַכּוֹת הָרָשָׁע (Devarim 25:2) שֶׁבִּן לַיְלָה הָיָה וּבִן לַיְלָה אָבָד (Yonah ...


14

Yitzchak's name was bestowed by Hashem (Gen. 17:19). (Yerushalmi, Berachos 1:6) Actually, Rashi (first explanation to Gen. 25:26) says that Yaakov was also named by Hashem. Yefeh Mar'eh simply says that the Yerushalmi evidently agrees with Rashi's second explanation, that he was named by Yitzchak. Tov Ayin, on the other hand, suggests that the difference ...


14

Naming children after the living is only discouraged among Ashkenazi Jews; among Sefardim it's not uncommon. (From Aish.com) Sephardi Jews also name children after relatives who are still alive. This source is from the Talmud, which records a child named after Rabbi Natan while he was still alive (Shabbat 134a) The reasons why Ashkenazim don't ...


13

I don't know that I'd put money on this one, but I heard that the original name was warach-sheman (an aramaic version of yerech shmini) and that the dialect allowed for an interchange between the w (our vav) and the m sound, corrupting it further to marach-shewan. After a search, I found a "What's the truth about..." on this subject which also talks more to ...


13

Or perhaps you mean the kings of Sodom and its sister cities? Their names were: Bera, Birsha, Shin'av, Shem'ever, and one whose name is not recorded (Ramban says that this is because he wasn't famous, as he ruled over the small town of Tzoar). (Gen. 14:2) The significance of their names, according to Rashi: Bera - ב' רע, doubly bad - against Hashem and ...


13

Its source may be the Arabic name Farida, which means "unique / precious" (as opposed to the Germanic name Frida, which means "peace"). [link]


13

See here that the letter (chart on the right) that the letter tzaddi - צ - has one of the lowest frequencies in the Hebrew alphabet. Only tet is lower. That is from anywhere in the word. A better frequency chart would be for the start of words. In terms of vav, while it is frequent even in the beginning of words, this is only as a connective letter, meaning ...


12

According to at least one major tradition, Yishma'el repented later in his life. Gen. 25:9 says that after Avraham died, "Yitzchak and Yishmael his sons buried him ..." According to Genesis Rabba as quoted by Rashi there, the order indicates that Yishma'el repented, as he recognized the precedence due his younger but covenentally endowed brother. For some ...


12

Minchas Shai (to Gen. 30:18, the first place where the name appears) cites Radak, who says that it this is an example of elision: the sound of the second letter is combined into that of the first. As another example, he gives מחצצרים (I Chron. 15:24 and in a few other places in Chronicles), where the second צ is silent. That said, as Yahu noted, there are ...


12

לפי תלמוד בבלי מסכת עירובין צו. מיכל בת שאול הניחה תפלין. האר"י מסביר זאת בכך שהייתה לה נשמה מעלמא דדכורא = נשמה מעולם הזכרים.‏ http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%9E%D7%99%D7%9B%D7%9C Maybe that is how the name became a male name?


12

Ya'akov Avinu was known as an ish tam. Since they shared the first name Ya'akov (and possibly some personal character traits), one's appelation was applied to the other.


12

Talmud Bavli (Sotah 12a): ותרא אותו כי טוב הוא תניא ר"מ אומר טוב שמו ר' יהודה אומר טוביה שמו רבי נחמיה אומר הגון לנביאות אחרים אומרים נולד כשהוא מהול וחכמים אומרים בשעה שנולד משה נתמלא הבית כולו אור "And she saw that he was good" (Shemos 2:2): R' Meir says his [Moshe's] name was Tov. R' Yehuda says his name was Tuvia. R' Nechemia says that he was to ...


12

The Shu"t Beit Avi (5:56) was asked this question and concludes that one should call him up as "Abba Isaac ben Moses" (for example). He says that by using the honorific "Abba" one alleviates the issue of calling one's parent by their first name (outlined in Shulchan Aruch YD 240:2). He notes that even though the Shulchan Aruch sounds like it is forbidden to ...


12

You mentioned this verse in passing, but as far as I can tell, it provides complete and convincing proof that G-d is known by multiple names. Exodus 6:2-3, from Mechon Mamre: וַיְדַבֵּר אֱלֹהִים, אֶל-מֹשֶׁה; וַיֹּאמֶר אֵלָיו, אֲנִי יְהוָה. וָאֵרָא, אֶל-אַבְרָהָם אֶל-יִצְחָק וְאֶל-יַעֲקֹב--בְּאֵל שַׁדָּי; וּשְׁמִי יְהוָה, לֹא נוֹדַעְתִּי לָהֶם ...


12

In Bereishis Rabbah 37:10, R. Yose says: הראשונים על ידי שהיו מכירים את ייחוסיהם, היו מוציאין שמן לשם המאורע. אבל אנו שאין אנו מכירים את ייחוסינו, אנו מוציאין לשם אבותינו "The earlier generations, who knew their genealogies, would name after events. We, however, who don't know our genealogies, name after our ancestors." (Etz Yosef explains that ...


12

In "What's in a Name", the English translation of Zusha Wilhelm's sefer "Ziv HaShemot", the following is stated: Some are particular not to marry a woman whose name is the same as one’s own. (See Maasei Ish, Choshen Mishpat 7; See also Sdei Chemed, entry on Chasan VeKallah paragraph 7; See also Otzar HaPoskim, Even HaEzer end of ch. 2, and the Testament ...


12

R. Mordechai Sasson, in his sefer דבר בעתו in the section called "רמזי מגלה", explains that Haman symbolizes the Yetzer Harah (evil inclination), and his ten sons allude to its ten bad character traits. Their death, brought about by Mordechai and Esther, represents the nullification of such evil traits by being overpowered by the Yetzer Tov (good ...


11

The source for the statement that it's disrespectful is Taz, Orach Chaim 621:2 (and from there in Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 6:3). He writes: ועוד יש ללמוד מדברים הנזכרים כאן דבמקום שאין אנו רוצים להזכיר שם של אדנות י"ל השם, ולא כמ"ש המון עם אדושם, כי אין זה דרך כבוד של מעלה, אלא י"ל כלשון התנא השם So it sounds like he's saying that the only ...


11

Perhaps you mean this Gemara (Sanhedrin 109b)? ארבע דייני היו בסדום שקראי ושקרוראי זייפי ומצלי דינא There were four judges in Sdom: Mr. Liar, Mr.Liarar, Mr. Forger, and Mr. Justice-Perverter. I think the Gemara's indicating they weren't too honest!


11

Leib (as well as Label, Leibush and Loeb) is the Yiddish version of the German Name Loeb which means Lion (from the German for lion, Löwe). The English equivalent of this name is often Leo or Leon which are root in the Latin word for lion, leo. [Source: Kolatch, Alfred J. 1984. The Complete Dictionary of English and Hebrew First Names. Middle Village: ...


11

Kibbud Av VaEim UMoraam 6:11 cites two opinions on this subject. Chida and Sdei Chemed argue that indeed in that case the child should use a different title for his father; by contrast, the Ben Ish Chai (in his responsa Torah Lishmah) says that "Abba" is inherently a respectful title. (It is interesting, too, that we find the amora Shmuel calling his father ...


11

According to the sources cited by the Gra on Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah 147:3, the prohibition against mentioning the name of a foreign deity does not apply to the name of Jesus, and in fact we find that he is mentioned by name in many sources. In a very interesting teshuva, R' Esriel Hildesheimer discusses this issue at some length. He comments that the ...



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