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7

You ask this question on the Friday of parasha Tzav. In a dvar Torah on that parasha, the Lubavitcher Rebbe (Likkutei Sichot vol I, pp. 217-219, cited in R Sachs' Torah studies p. 159) comments on the verse Vayikra 6:6 אֵ֗שׁ תָּמִ֛יד תּוּקַ֥ד עַל־הַמִּזְבֵּ֖חַ לֹ֥א תִכְבֶֽה Fire shall be kept burning upon the altar continually; it shall not go out ...


6

Rabbi Yosef Karo (1488 - 1575)states in Shulchan Aruch, (The Code of Jewish Law) that if a physician is able to heal a patient and refrains from doing so, this is considered murder. Yoreh Deah, 336:1 Rabbi Moshe Isserles (The Rema 1520 - 1572), writes on the Shulchan Aruch (Code of Jewish Law), that any act involving touching or moving a "gossess" (a term ...


5

Source in Jewish Literature The Talmud (kiddushin 70b) states that one who stigmatizes another is guilty of the same: ותני: כל הפוסל - פסול, ואינו מדבר בשבחא לעולם, ואמר שמואל: במומו פוסל He who declares [others] unfit is [himself] unfit, and never speaks good [of anyone]; and Samuel said: With his own blemish he stigmatizes [others] as unfit.’ (...


5

ArtScroll has a book titled "The Fifth Commandment" that sounds like it might be what you're looking for.


5

This is a midrash from Kohelet Rabbah 7:16, Tanhuma, Parashat Mezora,1; Yalkut Shimoni, I Samuel, Chapter 121 and the Rambam in Guide for the Perplexed Part 3, Chapter 39. See also Me’am Loez Anthology on Exodus, 21:14 Rav Hirsch points out in Mishpatim 21:14 that it is a commandment to put a murderer to death and it is not allowed to show him "mercy". ...


4

Chapter 3 (p. 46 here): ונתבונן כי אם יבכה האדם מרוב מכאוביו ומרוב צרותיו אז יזלו מים מעיניו, על מה עשה ה׳ ככה כי ירדו מים מעינים ולא מאברים אחרים, אם יד או רגל או אבר אחר נלקה, העינים מורידים דמעות, מפני מה העינים יבכו בעד כל אברי הגוף, כי הוא זה מפני כי עיני האדם המה ראשית לכל חטאת, ובעבור חטאותיו בא האדם במצוקותיו, ולכן בעת כי יצר לאדם ורע ...


4

I think you're referring to the fourth sha'ar, Sha'ar HaBitachon, third chapter (starts at "מדוע האדם צריך לטרוח בעבודה?‏"). In English (starts at "Why man must work for a livelihood").


3

R' Yechiel Perr, RY in Far Rockaway was asked by Dr Alan Morinis about this. Morinis's Mussar Institute teaches a lot of people whose spouse is Jewish, or who self-identify as Jewish but are far from being Jews halachically. I was present when the question was asked. Rabbi Perr said that Mussar -- development of one's middos -- is also obligatory for non-...


3

The original quote is תורתו של הבעל שם טוב, שכאשר אדם רואה רע בזולתו, הרי זו הוכחה ש(דוגמת) אותו הרע נמצא בו בעצמו. וכמו אדם המביט בראי – "אם פניו נקיים, אינו רואה במראה שום דופי", אבל אם הוא רואה לכלוך וכתם בראי, אין זה אלא משום ש"פניו מטונפין. From the hosafos to Kesser Shem Tov (http://chabadlibrary.org/books/default.aspx?furl=/bsht/kst/3/176). The ...


3

To consolidate the comments above: at first glance, Jewish law would prohibit unplugging the violinist too -- assuming being plugged in is no threat to your life. So it's kind of a moot point. We care about the situation at hand, not passing judgment on how it came about. (There is certainly discussion about pregnancies that threaten the mother's mental ...


3

It is permissible to omit or otherwise present the truth misleadingly for reasons of tact or to maintain peace. As in the lyrics of the famous wedding song "keitzad meraqdim". The gemara asks (Keusvos 16b), "How does one celebrate before the bride?" Beis Shammai answer (17a) that one should describe the bride as she is. Beis Hillel tell us to call her a "...


3

Rashi and other commentators say it means he tortured them. Ralbag explains that this was to dissuade other peoples from fighting the Jews. (See the context starting at, say, 10:1.)


3

Background: Hashem created you. You are to him like an only son. If he made you, it's because he needed you to be around. You are not a mistake. That being said: Hashem obviously knew what would "come out" of you (though, as the Rambam says - at least I think that's who said it - : "It is (almost-?-) impossible to understand how free choice and Hashgocha ...


3

No. Not at all. But you can purchase the book from Makhon Mosheh in Israel. Their website is www.net-sah.org If it is not online, then try calling or emailing them. Their site is currently being updated and is under a bit of minor construction. I personally have it on my shelf. Is there a particular passage that you are looking for that I could post a ...


3

Personally, I've found that when things are not going so well is exactly when my devotion increases -- it's clear that I can't fix whatever the problem is on my own and I need God's help. Which, really, is true for all of us all the time, but sometimes we don't notice and claim too much credit for ourselves. Pirke Avot 2:1 says: Know what is above from ...


3

By learning a little bit of Sha'ar HaBitahhon everyday.


2

I believe Rav Menachem Leibtag has suggested that the emphasis on full payment, as well as the level of detail regarding the transaction, considering that this was the very first act of acquisition by the Jewish people of the land of Israel, is meant to serve as a proof of sorts that acquisition was legally sound and binding in perpetuity. In which case, ...


2

Likutei Sichos 10 - page 63 - column 3 explains that Avraham wanted to pay in full, thus totally eradicating any connection Ephron had with this field. The lesson would thus be, that when one gets a discount or reduction in price from a seller, the buyer will remain indebted unless he pays its full price.


2

The general principle involved here is טעות עכו"ם - mistakes of a non-Jew. Halachically giving the wrong change is a mistake falls under the general rubric of returning lost objects. Halacha requires one to go to great lengths to return lost objects, but limits this to fellow Jews. If something is found in a location where it is most likely that it was a non-...


2

The Shulchan Aruch rules that one should always be in the habit of saying, "Everything the Merciful One does is for the best." (Orach Chaim 230:5; Berachos 60b). So we should say that throughout the day, whenever something happens. A shorter equivalent would be "gamzu l'tovah" from the Talmudic story of Nachum Gamzo. (Ta'anis 21a). Similarly, the Yerushalmi ...


2

some suggestions strengthen your faith in God and His torah. study books which teach on the subject that God is in charge of everything such as the chovos halevavos shaar bitachon. avoid reading things written by those who don't believe in these things


2

The fact that although you are holding where you are, your service is still allowed and even demanded, is alone a good cause for celebration. In reality we should be told that learning Gemara, Davenning, Succah, Shabbos etc. is not for you. Just be a citizen of the world in which you spend most of your time. And yet, our service is allowed, requested, ...


2

I recommend reading the book Garden of Purity by Rabbi Shalom Arush, which explains in detail not only the importance of guarding one's eyes and avoiding lustful thoughts, but also how to achieve these goals. In short, given your situation he would probably recommend not looking at her (and avoiding interacting with her if possible), and engaging in daily ...


2

This may be a matter of semantics but, inasmuch as halacha is defined as what one should do in any given scenario, the answer to 1 is necessarily no. This isn't to say that halacha is "one size fits all". On the contrary, the nuances of each individual case are what define its unique ruling. (This is the prime motivation behind the AYLOR caveat prevalent on ...


2

You are most probably thinking of the Gemara Sota 8b which uses that exact depiction. The discussion there is about a Sota. The Mishna, after mentioning a couple of ways how she is de-beautified, says that if she is wearing gold or jewelry it is removed. The Gemara wonders, is this necessary to tell us after describing how she is degraded? The Gemara answers,...


2

The gemmora in first perek of megillah says that Achashverosh ordered Vashti to come before him as described in your question.


2

The passuk says in Mishlei 11,22, 'Nezem zagav be'af chazir, ishah yaphah v'soras taam'. A gold ring in the nose of a pig, a beatifull woman with no reason. The mishna in Avos 6,2 quotes this passuk to describe someone who is blessed with physical endowments but does not learn Torah. The Ruach ha'Chaim on this mishna explains this is analogous to a naked ...


2

R Norman Lamm (in a 1965 typeset dvar Torah !, see also here) mentions the source as being the Vilna Gaon (p. 7). He applies it (pp. 8ff) to tsedaka and gives examples such as lending money with no interest, not feeling bad about giving money, mishloach manot (well, that changed!) then shatnez, shaving, rising in front of the elder, minha in a mynian, tzniut....


1

First, I'll copy the Hebrew text of the Gemara with Rashi's comments and Tosfot about this problem. But I will mark it in English. Thus, readers who do not understand the Hebrew or Aramaic able to just read the annotations. Annotations can be read linearly. Translations are borrowing from Soncino. I skip the first sentence of the Gemara in order not to ...


1

Aruch Hashulchan 228:1 says that included in the prohibition of onaas d'varim, causing pain with words, is this: He shall not say to his fellow, "For how much [money] are you willing to give [me] this item?" [if] he has no desire to buy it. Or, if donkey-drivers were asking him [if they could] buy grain [from him], he shall not tell them, "Go to so-and-...



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