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I heard on a daf yomi shiur That , The reason that music is forbidden is that it is not good to rejoice after the Bais hamikdosh was destroyed, the reasons it is permitted is it is used for good things (wedding) or it has torah in the lyrics (so by singing or listening you are leaning)


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The Parameters of Kol Isha by Rabbi Howard Jachter addresses this. See the full article for the details, but here are some excerpts: The Gemara (Berachot 24a) states, “The voice of a woman is Ervah, as the Pasuk [in Shir Hashirim 2:14] states ‘let me hear your voice because your voice is pleasant and appearance attractive.’” Rashi explains that the ...


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The Wikipedia article on Tzniut ("modesty") contains this text about singing: Female singing voice Orthodox Judaism In Orthodox Judaism, men are generally not allowed to hear women sing, a prohibition called kol isha.[16] The Talmud classifies this as ervah (literally "nakedness"). The majority view of halachic authorities[17] is that this ...


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Why doesn't Judaism put more of an emphasis on expressing our love for Hashem through music, song and poetry in a formal sense as in the Shul on days when musical instruments can be played. Or just with formal musical concerts and the like. It does. Music has always been a huge part of the Jewish liturgical experience, across all cultures of Judaism ...


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From what I could infer from this article, it seems that "Rabbi Leon (Yehudah Aryeh) Modena (1571-1648) was one of the most colorful figures in the Jewish Renaissance. He was an accomplished musician, and served as cantor in the Italian Synagogue in Venice. " He encouraged integrating Rossi's music as part of the service. He met with considerable ...


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Partial answer -- I had a couple of these handy. Someday we will all be together [He must gather all the Jews back to the Land of Israel (Is. 43:5-6)] Someday we'll be sheltered and warm Never will we have to express any fear [He must usher in an era of world peace and bring an end to war/fear(Is. 2:4)] The second stanza is clearly starting with a ...


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I suggest contacting the folks at Machon Moreshet Ashkenaz, which is (in their words) "dedicated to the research, preservation and transmission of the unique religious values, customs, and folklore of German Jewry, as they existed prior to the Holocaust." This includes research into nusach and liturgigal minhagim. This page discusses liturgy and has some ...


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Mizrahis ululate even in present day. My fam Iraqi Jew and we stay ululating for any joyous occasion or just when we get together and get rowdy



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