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29

In this interview with Terry Gross (around 5:08), those lyrics' author, Sheldon Harnick, says that he basically made up syllables that he thought would "give the effect" of "Chassidic chanting," despite not being familiar with such chanting from his own background. The first person to play Tevye, Zero Mostel, then replaced the syllables Harnick had written ...


11

Maybe because early Jewish recordings were mostly cantorial style, and there was a serious concern that people would play recordings of Shabbos and Yom Tov liturgy on those days. Also, perhaps it is psychologically more disturbing to think that someone will play a recording that makes your voice speak on Shabbos.


11

The source is Psalms 119:92 - לוּלֵי תוֹרָתְךָ שַׁעֲשֻׁעָי אָז אָבַדְתִּי בְעָנְיִי Or, in the JPS translation - Unless Thy law had been my delight, I should then have perished in mine affliction.


11

I was a little boy at home when my father Yigal Calek ny"v composed Mareh Cohen - there's a very interesting 'composer's inspiration' story to go with it too... Anyway, so yes, pretty much "at the source" ;)


9

After a bit more searching, it looks like Yigal Calek of the London School of Jewish Song may be the original composer as late as 1971.


8

I've found this video of R' Elyashiv learning at home. There is also this much longer video (with better audio), but the first 8:15 of this one is dubbed over with music. Although it's longer, watch the second one, or leave it playing in the background while you do other work/learn, because you're right, in the recording he does hum and chant his learning ...


8

In the introduction to his commentary on Masekhet Avot (Shemonah Peraqim), chapter five, the Rambam says: והוא הדין מי שהתרגשה עליו מרה שחורה, ועמד והסירה בשמיעת הניגונים ובמיני הזמר, ובטיול בגינות ובבניינים נאים, ובישיבה עם צורות נאות וכיוצא בדברים שמרחיבים הנפש ומסירים הרהוריו הקודרים ממנה.‏ In translation (from Wikisource): Similarly, one ...


7

According to Rabbi Yitshak Yosef in Yalkut Yosef recorded music that brings the heart closer to God has al mi lismoch. Many Ashkenaz posekim bring other Heterim.


7

The SHU"T MAHARSHAG(חלק ב' סימן קכ''ה) answers since people use it to rid themselves of depression it is allowed. Reb W(V)osner the Shevet Halevi(חלק ח' סימן קכ''ז) says that a tape in his opinion is like a regular musical instrument and therfore would seem to be assur the whole year,and he says this includes Accapella as the tape itself turns into an ...


7

Two popular Chabad Chassidic niggunim were both adapted from French songs: "Napoleon's March," taken from the marching tune used by the French army during their invasion of Russia in 1812. (R' Shneur Zalman is said to have heard the tune and said that it represents the ultimate victory of "our" - the Russian - side, as indeed occurred.) "Ha'aderes ...


7

Look for anything by Velvel Pasternak. For example, The Jewish Fake Book or The Ultimate Jewish Piano Book (both on JewishMusic.com). There are also more specialized collections, such as Sefer Hanigunim (2 vols.), a collection of Chabad niggunim.


7

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein in Igrot Moshe Yore Deah vol 2 no 111 states: Music (with or without words) performed to honor a religious diety is prohibited. Music with words of religous praise are prohibited even when performed in a secular setting. No distinction is made regarding language or comprehension. Religious music without words of ...


7

The March 20, 2013 issue of Mishpacha magazine contains the following anecdote in an interview of the singer Avrohom Fried, regarding the events preceding the production of his first album, "No Jew Will be Left Behind," in 1981: [He] kept his plan quiet. But he wrote a letter to the [Lubavitcher] Rebbe explaining his idea, and the Rebbe wrote back ...


7

They can be reached at themishnaproject@gmail.com - Good luck.


7

Bruce, may you live and be well to 120, but I'm reminded here of someone's definition of a "Jewish question": someone gets up and makes a big statement, then just raises the pitch at the very end so it sounds like a question. I don't know what you mean by "predator", I don't know what the allegations are, I don't care. Let's talk theory here. Rabbi Moshe ...


7

The Mishna in Beitza 5:2 teaches that one may not clap their hands or slap their thigh, lest they come to make or fix instruments (Rashi to Beitza 36a - keeping the beat this way will lead to simcha and song [which will lead to music and instruments]). ולא מספקין, ולא מרקדין, ולא מטפחין. The Shulchan Aruch O.C. 339:3 extends this to banging with nuts, ...


6

Seth, all of the detailed laws regarding when you don't have to worry about listening to music and when you do are really just applications of a single broader law: When Av comes around, we restrict our joy. Actions that are done for joy are improper. If they are done for other reasons, thats OK. For example, building for joy is prohibited. So I can't ...


6

Rav Hutner allowed it because he felt there is no real true simcha from taped Music that will bring you to dancing and since that is the reason for the Issur he allowed it during sefira.By extension of the same logic Reb Shlomo Zalman in his sefer on Pesach allows Chazunis and classical music too of course he adds it is better to be stringent.Reb Pinchas ...


6

See http://www.businesshalacha.com/webfm_send/860 and http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/english/halacha/schneider_1.htm. There are several reasons why copying tapes could be prohibited. Many poskim hold that "Intellectual property" is like real property. One who steals "intellectual property" is like real stealing. When one sells a tape, one could make a ...


6

http://archive.org/details/Yetziv_Pisgam Is that the one you've heard?


6

The Jewish laws regarding "work" on the sabbath are complex and their application, especially into areas of modern technology require much study and the help of a local well educated teacher or mentor. However, one thing to remember -- in Judaism there is no concept of "do X and go to hell." Not only is the Jewish notion of post-death "punishment" ...


6

The laws of Shabbat apply only to Jews, so someone who isn't Jewish is doing no wrong whatsoever when they watch TV on Friday night. For Jews, as pointed out in the comments, there is a difference between turning on a television and watching it. Turning on the TV directly activates a flow of electricity, which mainstream halachic opinion (certainly as I ...


6

The source is Yirmiyahu 33:10-11


6

A friends of mine who is a Kohen told me that he once ended up in Washington Heights for Yom Tov and showed up at Breuer's (German minhag) on Yom Tov morning. The Gabbai asked him if he was a Kohen, and after answering affirmatively, the Gabbai sighed, and called over another Kohen to give him a quick lesson in how the tune goes. Apparently, in addition to ...


6

This tune was composed by Ben Zion Shenker of the Modzitzer chassidim. I can't really do justice to his legacy in words here, but see the bio I've linked. His place at almost every shabbos table in the world is well deserved. And a link to a recording of Ben Zion Shenker himself singing this: http://www.piyut.org.il/tradition/841.html?currPerformance=1093


6

Na Nach Breslovers (as opposed to all breslovers) chant this "song" based off a story that a letter fell from heaven, this letter was found by R Yisroel Ber Odesser. The letters contents said: "It was very difficult for me to come down to you my precious student to tell you that I had pleasure very much from your devotion and upon you I said my fire will ...


5

I have heard from my uncle, who has been very active in the Jewish Music industry, that when he played the tune Ashkenazim use for singing the seder (order) of the Seder Night (Kadesh, Urchatz, etc.) for his music professor, the professor exclaimed that the tune was at least 1000 years old. Then I sang the tune for some sefardic friends who exclaimed that ...


5

We're just rehashing this question. In summary: Some Rishonim read the Gemara as prohibiting all music year-round; others say only music at drinking parties. The Rambam, Mechaber, and R' Moshe Feinstein say it's all music. For whatever reason, common practice has been to be lenient like the other Rishonim. Rabbi Welcher referred to this ruling of R' ...


5

Not having a television, and not being a big music guy anyways, I've only seen bits of the program at my fathers house while it was on, and that was many years ago. Nevertheless from memory and/or assumption I would suggest the following issues: T.V. in and of itself isn't so poshut (simple, i.e. it isn't a given that it is permitted in the first place, I ...


5

See Moishe Dovid Lebovits, "Lag B'Omer," 5 Towns Jewish Times: Night or Day. Many have the custom to make the bonfires (and dancing) on the night of Lag B’omer. Others say that the simcha should start at day.85 However, it seems that the minhag is to conduct the bonfire and dancing at night all over the world, not only in Meron.86 ...



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