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19

A less poetic but more probable explanation than the one SimchasTorah linked to... Dates back to when grave markers were cairns, which is the biblical meaning of the word "matzeivah" (before we shifted it to mean tombstone). A cairn is a pile of stone. With rain and wind, the pile would shrink. So, out of respect for the deceased, so they not be forgotten, ...


13

From the Be'er Heiteiv, Orach Chaim 224:8: מה שתולשין עשב או צרור ומשימין על םצבה אינו אלא משום כבוד המת להראות שהוא על קברו. Translated, That one takes up grass or a stone and places it on the grave marker is simply to accord honor to the deceased; to show that one has been present at the grave. Quoted in the "laws" section of the OU/Artscroll ...


11

The Shulchan Aruch rules (YD 340:11) that women and men have an equal obligation in terms of keri'a, but that women should turn their undershirt around after tearing it before tearing her overshirt. Furthermore, in :15 he rules that a woman who performed keri'a is allowed to perform a non-professional stitch-up immediately after tearing, whereas a man would ...


10

Nit'ei Gavriel (Aveilus 4:4) cites various sources that there is a common practice to not tear kriyah in this instance anyway (and in note יב he mentions other variations, such as leaving a button undone for a while, or tearing kriyah at the moment of death only for a distinguished person). In 4:7 he also writes that it is indeed not customary for doctors ...


10

The Shaalos U'tshuvos Afraksa D'Anya - Siman 30 discusses this question and concludes that each mourner may have his own Minyan.


7

From an article on aish.com by Rabbi Yisrael Rutman: ...a person who has lost a loved one often feels that he has been abandoned by God; that there is no God where he is. We say to the mourner, therefore, that HaMakom should comfort him: We pray that he be blessed by a renewed awareness of God's presence, even in the grief-stricken place in which he now ...


7

I was at a wedding where they did not serve soup and there were placecards on the table that stated the reason was because of the aformentioned reason and had the Shuchan Aruch written out; I was intrigued as until then I had not heard of it.


7

See HALACHICALLY SPEAKING, Customs During Sefira Part 11: Shaving for a date One is not permitted to shave during his custom of sefira even if he has a date.(99) (99)Harav Yisroel Belsky Shlita, see Piskei Shmuos pages 62-63 quoting the opinion of Harav Elyashiv Shlita.


7

The Bracha - Boruch ... Dayan HaEmes - is said on Shabbos. (Rokeiach Hilchos Aveilos 316 Minhagim, Shibolei HaLeket Hilchos Simchos 13, Tanya Siman 66, Sidur Bais Yaakov - Rabbi Yaakov Emdin, Chochmas Adam Klal 151 Siman 18)


7

I don't think one can visualize the churban bais hamikdash without a change in life and perspective. However, I did hear of a summer camp, which had the kids build forts and other buildings, and then on Tisha B'av the counselors burned it all down, and deestroyed it. This apparently helped the kids gain an appreciation of the feelings of loss with the ...


7

No. From one parent who actually observed a bat mitzva by having her daughter tear for the first time: Mishnah Berurah, Orach Chaim 561:17. In fact, children might be forbidden to tear their clothes because of ba’al tashchit, the prohibition against wanton waste! See, for a related analysis, Minchat Chinuch 264:34 (Machon Yerushalayim edition, ...


7

Whether or not tashmish and other private acts of mourning remain forbidden on Shabbat Tisha b'Av is a difference of opinion between the Mechaber and the Rama in Shulchan Aruch OC 554:19 with the Mechaber permitting and the Rama forbidding. Some Achronim debate whether Ashkenazim can rely on the Mechaber in certain pressing circumstances so please CYLOR for ...


7

See here, One may dry his hands on a towel and then use the damp towel to clean his eyes and face, as the towel isn’t wet enough to impart enough water to wet something else (tofach al menat le-hatpiach) (Shulchan Arukh 554:11). (If one must actually clean one’s eyes in the morning, it is permitted to do so normally, as it is no different than ...


7

From "The Jewish Way in Death and Mourning" by Maurice Lamm: Community business meetings, such as synagogue or fraternal organization membership meetings, are permitted the mourner after shiva. Social dinners, even though no music is played, and even though they are held for charitable causes, are not to be attended by mourners for parents ...


6

Seth, all of the detailed laws regarding when you don't have to worry about listening to music and when you do are really just applications of a single broader law: When Av comes around, we restrict our joy. Actions that are done for joy are improper. If they are done for other reasons, thats OK. For example, building for joy is prohibited. So I can't ...


6

Regarding sending to other family members even if you do not know them, see Shaalos UTshuvos Tshuvos VHanhogos Chelek 1 Siman 692:44, by Rabbi Moshe Sternbuch, which says that you can not give to other family members if you do not know them. However, Rabbi Dovid Feinstein (quoted by Rabbi Avrohom Aba Freundlich) has ruled that you may. Regarding someone who ...


6

Nit'ei Gavriel brings a disagreement between poskim in this matter. He writes, therefore, that one should be stringent, but in a pressing situation (מקום צורך), one may be lenient.


6

Nit'ei Gavri'el on Avelus (14:9-14) quotes the following rules [some sources in brackets]: No sending gifts to a mourner within 30 days, and 12 months for an orphan [Ram"a 385:3] Exceptions: Yes sending gifts to a bar mitzva boy in mourning because he was a minor when his mourning period began and because it is a mitzva [cf. Divrei Malki'el 5:233] Yes ...


6

One should tear Kriyah: for a parent on the left side for another family member (for whom one sits shiva) on the right side for Har Ha'Bayit (ie. the Kotel) on the left side The tear should be made on one's upper most garment, it should be one tefach in length (around 3.5-4 inches or around 9cm). One must tear kriyah standing. When tearing kriyah for a ...


6

I think it helps to study mishnayos or g'mara (Midos, Tamid, Yoma, P'sachim, perhaps others) about the avoda and miracles in the bes hamikdash. (Likewise, the musafos ("yotz'ros" of musaf) of Yom Kipur.) It gives one a feel for what's missing. Reading the ArtScroll kinos helps one focus on the loss and gives an idea of the difference that the churban made ...


6

No. Mourning in Halacha 16:30 note 67a, citing Shmiras Shabbos Kehilchasa §65 note 163, citing R' Shlomo Zalman Auerbach ZT"L


6

First of all, I am not aware of any actual halachic source that states that a suicide is to be buried separately from the main Jewish cemetery. If anyone knows of a source for this, please let me know. In any event, while many of the halachos of mourning do not apply in the case of suicide (Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh Deah 345), this is only true if the person ...


6

In discussing laws associated with consoling mourners, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein (Igrot Moshe OC 5:20:21) uses the phrase in its singular masculine form: המקום ינחם אותך Rabbi Menashe Klein (Mishneh Halachot 4:144) offers condolences to the recipient of the responsa on the recent loss of his mother, also using the singular masculine form.


6

Rav Moshe Feinstein (Igrot Moshe OC 1:168) holds that in general one can have a wedding on the night of 17 Tammuz when necessary, but says in that same teshuva that for sure when the fast is Nidche that you can't have a wedding Saturday night. (I assume all other restrictions follow.)


6

Rav Shumel Kamentzky, cited in sefer Kovetz Halachos pg 231, writes that a nursing woman or someone riding a bus may sit, because it is a necessary thing and not done out of enjoyment. Sitting on the toilet is a need and not meant for enjoyment and should be the same.


5

http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=46540&st=&pgnum=450 Per the Nitei Gavriel quoting the Shulchan Aruch there is no difference in a year that has two Adars. The time of mourning is the same length.


5

First, let's address the issue of shaving during the 3 weeks generally. According to R' YB Soloveichik, Shiurei HaRav Al Inyanei Aveilut V'Tisha B'Av, pp. 20-21, there is "a basis for shaving one's beard during this period. He contends that the observances of the three week mourning period are patterned after the twelve month period of mourning that one ...


5

I suspect another influence on this is that according to Midrash, in Temple times, mourners would enter the Temple and be told: השוכן בבית הזה ינחמך May the One whose Presence is felt here grant you consolation If so it would make a lot of sense that in post-Temple times, the greeting became: May the One beyond space grant you consolation.


5

The Mishna Berura (OC 551 sk 32) rules that one may shave or take a haircut to look nice for Shabbat if one generally does that action at least once a week.



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