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13

Telephone exchanges in the US used to have two letters, sometimes referring to the neighborhood the exchange serves, and one number. So, Rav Moshe's phone number was 677-1222. ORegon/67 was an exchange in the Lower East Side. I don't know why they decided to name that exchange "Oregon." This database has multiple references to ORegon but no explanation.


12

R' Moshe himself apparently used Beis Yosef kesav. In his letter to the Lubavitcher Rebbe about Rabbeinu Tam's tefillin (Igros Moshe, vol. 6, no. 9), at the end, R' Moshe asks that the sofer whom the Rebbe charged with writing him a pair of R"T tefillin (I have heard orally that this was R' Eliezer Zirkind) should do so using Beis Yosef script, so that it ...


11

In 1981, Hugh Carey was governor of New York. According to Wikipedia: He is also remembered for preventing conservative legislators from reinstating the death penalty So the subject of the death penalty would certainly have been on his mind. My understanding of the responsum is Rav Moshe is not weighing in pro or con per se regarding what the State ...


10

I think the answer here is that it is always ok to challenge a gadol - if you do so directly. R' Klein disagreed with R' Moshe, so he wrote to R' Moshe asking about it. Do it respectfully, and from the perspective of someone trying to learn, not as someone who has something to prove. The key is to realize that they are known as a gadol for a reason, and ...


10

Many library systems have access to PDFs of the historical New York Times. The 1975 interview is an article from May 5, 1975, entitled: "Responsa: The Law as Seen By Rabbis for 1,000 Years", by Israel L. Shenker; pages 33 and 61. I can see the PDF but as it's owned by ProQuest, I don't think I'm allowed to repost it. There's a picture of Rav Moshe ...


9

http://www.scribd.com/doc/69094686/NY-Times-1975-Article-About-R-Moshe-Feinstein


9

The Tefillin of Rabbenu Tam were written by R' Zirkind, at the special request of R' Moshe. These tefillin were checked by my rebbe, Rabbi Shmuel Schneid, who told me that the tefillin were written in typical Russian Beis Yosef script. As any sofer experienced with Sifre Torah of the world will tell you, before 1948, each country and Edah had their unique ...


8

Rav Moshe gives no litmus test. But one must be honest with themselves, and learn as much as possible, and double check their understanding.


7

See this page on KosherShaver.org for what looks like a pretty thorough background on all of the issues. Rav Moshe Feinstein understood the aforementioned sugyah in accordance with this latter approach. According to this approach, when the Gemara rules that an item which both destroys and shaves is prohibited, and defined this item as being a razor, it ...


7

We are fortunate that these great people recorded such personal moments, because it shows us that they were human, and they struggled with situations no less difficult than any of us. Lest anyone say "this and this posek was not grounded in reality; he never experienced the real world," these words demonstrate an involvement in the same emotional struggle of ...


7

Here is a quote from the 1986 obituary in NYT - Typical of his modesty was this answer he gave in a 1975 interview as to how he had acquired his standing as a posek. ''You don't wake up in the morning and decide you're an expert on answers,'' he said. ''If people see that one answer is good and another answer is good, gradually you will be accepted.'' I ...


6

Per Artscroll - new Wasserman edition "Reb Moshe" page 172 "While Reb Moshe and Reb Shlomo Zalman never met in person"........ The new Artscroll Reb Moshe book mentions that Reb Shlomo Zalman did not speak at his funeral.


6

It was his phone number. The first two letters of the word "ORegon" are numbers; after that come the numbers 7-1222.


6

He pronounced it the way any Jew of Lithuanian or Russian origin would have pronounced it back then: "Feinshtain". Being that this is not our natural pronunciation of such names, it would appear to me to be disrespectful to mimic his European pronunciation. His own children and grandchildren do not use the old pronunciation unless they are among people who ...


5

And as for the matter of whether it's permissible to eat in a restaurant in which they prepare only dairy foods but which is of people who desecrate the sabbath, lo, even in that place there can be a number of forbidden foods such as non-kosher fishes, and the fat in which they fry [things] can be from non-kosher animals or animals not properly ...


5

The famous comment of the Ramban at the end of Parshas Bo “And from the great and well-known miracles a man comes to admit to hidden miracles which are the foundation of the whole Torah. A person has no portion in the Torah of Moses unless he believes that all our matters and circumstances are miracles and they do not follow nature or the general ...


5

Rabbi Harry Lax was the last recipient of smicha from Rabbi Soloveichik. I was told this by a great-nephew of Rabbi Soloveichik, who I know from Kehliath Jeshurun synagogue in Manhattan.


5

From what I've heard, it all starts with how you measure a "thumb-width", and from there multiply up to "handbreadth" (tefach), "cubit" (ama), and so on. The thumb-width question is whether it's measured from the narrower or wider part of the thumb.


5

There is an alternative, corn-based product called "zein" that, according to the linked WP article at least, "may be labeled as 'confectioner's glaze.'" According to an email I received from someone in the Hashgacha industry, zein coatings, unlike shellac coatings, "generally do not contain alcohol." I don't know if this was the product used in your candy; ...


4

Going back to the KosherShavers page, footnote 23 ( http://www.koshershaver.org/why.htm#_ftn23) makes it clear that R. Henkin has a written tshuva on the matter: כתבי הגר"י הענקין ח"ב דף רמ"ד בענין גדילת הזקן (And R. Henkin was the major posek in the US during his lifetime -- only after he passed away did R. Moshe take on that role. So that should satisfy ...


4

He (Rav Moshe) studied with his father and also in yeshivas located in Slutsk, Shklov and Amstislav, before being appointed rabbi of Lubań where he served for sixteen years. (Wikipedia) He (Rav Moshe)joined the yeshiva of R' Isser Zalman Meltzer in Slutzk at the age of twelve, where he also learned under the tutelage of HaRav Pesach Pruskin, zt"l. When the ...


3

There is a very slightly different account here, which places the story in the context of religious persecution and Rav Moshe's ostensible motivations for leaving Russia. But something tells me by "details about this story" you mean "specific contents of the calculus problem", in which case this is no help. . .


3

I'm pretty sure that almost every time I've heard rabbis mentioning R' Moshe's last name, it was with a long "e" sound. The pronunciation (of anything) in this video is by no means authoritative. I think that we should, indeed, pronounce people's names as they'd pronounce them, to the best of our knowledge and ability. For one thing, universal pronunciation ...


3

He pronounced it "fajnʃtajn", as in both "ei"s sounding like "eye" and the "s" like an "sh". I am reporting a firsthand account of Rav Moshe using this pronunciation regularly.


3

As a shin-challenged Litvak, it is likely that R. Moshe personally pronounced it with the /s/ as we Americans do, and not the Yiddish /sh/. Re Isaac's point about pronouncing it as they did as a mark of respect, if so then we'd be obliged to pronounce his first name "Mayse."


3

Rabbi J. David Bleich quotes R. Moshe on this question as follows ("SURVEY OF RECENT HALAKHIC PERIODICAL LITERATURE," Tradition 18:4): Rabbi Feinstein addresses himself specifically to the question of government supervision and to the contention that fear of punitive measures may constitute an adequate substitute for the presence of a mashgiach. ...


3

I do not think every question requires an answer. however this author obviously did not pay attention to Harav Moshe Zatzal's reasoning. The simple reason why HaRav Moshe allowed this was due to the severe financial penalties a company would incur if they lied and passed off something else as cows milk.


2

Another issue, though perhaps unrelated to the above opiners, is that these measurements are not stable with human appendages being a siman. Rather, the width of an average thumb defines the measurement, which can change with changing generations. Rav Moshe uses this logic (quoting the Chasam Sofer/Chavos Yair) as one apology for why the Chasam Sofer had a ...


2

My feeling is that this is a complicated issue that relates to nature of paskening halachah. Obviously cogency of the argument is a prime factor but ultimately the authority of the posek is also a factor. If their is what I believe to be called "taus b'davar mishnah", an outright error in the halachah (which we might expect to be somewhat seldom among ...


2

Judaism does not demand blind obedience to the authority of a rabbi. There is definitely no problem with asking a rabbi a question on his psak. If the rabbi cannot be consulted with, a posek can rule differently. However, one cannot pasken halacha unless he is actually fit to do so. There is a relevant gemara in Baba Basra 130b (cited in "A Study on Rava’s ...



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